Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A unit of weight equal to 16 ounces (453.592 grams).
  • n. A unit of apothecary weight equal to 12 ounces (373.242 grams). See Table at measurement.
  • n. A unit of weight differing in various countries and times.
  • n. A British unit of force equal to the weight of a standard one-pound mass where the local acceleration of gravity is 9.817 meters (32.174 feet) per second per second.
  • n. The basic monetary unit of the United Kingdom, worth 20 shillings or 240 old pence before the decimalization of 1971. Also called pound sterling.
  • n. See Table at currency.
  • n. The primary unit of currency in Ireland before the adoption of the euro.
  • n. A monetary unit of Scotland before the Act of Union (1707). Also called pound scots.
  • n. The pound key on a telephone.
  • transitive v. To strike repeatedly and forcefully. See Synonyms at beat.
  • transitive v. To beat to a powder or pulp; pulverize or crush.
  • transitive v. To instill by persistent, emphatic repetition: pounded knowledge into the students' heads.
  • transitive v. To assault with heavy gunfire.
  • intransitive v. To strike vigorous, repeated blows: He pounded on the table.
  • intransitive v. To move along heavily and noisily: The children pounded up the stairs.
  • intransitive v. To pulsate rapidly and heavily; throb: My heart pounded.
  • intransitive v. To move or work laboriously: a ship that pounded through heavy seas.
  • n. A heavy blow.
  • n. The sound of a heavy blow; a thump.
  • n. The act of pounding.
  • idiom pound the pavement Slang To travel the streets on foot, especially in search of work.
  • n. A public enclosure for the confinement of stray dogs or livestock.
  • n. A place in which impounded property is held until redeemed.
  • n. An enclosure in which animals or fish are trapped or kept.
  • n. A place of confinement for lawbreakers.
  • transitive v. To confine in or as if in a pound; impound.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Short for pound-force, a unit of force/weight.
  • n. A unit of mass equal to 16 avoirdupois ounces (= 453.592 37 g). Today this value is the most common meaning of "pound" as a unit of weight.
  • n. A unit of mass equal to 12 troy ounces (≈ 373.242 g). Today, this is a common unit of weight when measuring precious metals, and is little used elsewhere.
  • n. The symbol # (octothorpe, hash)
  • n. The unit of currency used in the United Kingdom and its dependencies. It is divided into 100 pence.
  • n. Any of various units of currency used in Cyprus, Egypt, Lebanon, and formerly in the Republic of Ireland and Israel.
  • n. Plural form of pound (unit of currency)
  • n. A place for the detention of stray or wandering animals.
  • n. A place for the detention of automobiles that have been illegally parked, abandoned, etc.
  • n. The part of a canal between two locks, and therefore at the same water level.
  • v. To strike hard, usually repeatedly.
  • v. To crush to pieces; to pulverize.
  • v. To eat or drink very quickly.
  • v. To pitch consistently to a certain location.
  • v. To beat strongly or throb.
  • v. To vigorously sexually penetrate.
  • v. To advance heavily with measured steps.
  • n. A hard blow.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An inclosure, maintained by public authority, in which cattle or other animals are confined when taken in trespassing, or when going at large in violation of law; a pinfold.
  • n. A level stretch in a canal between locks.
  • n. A kind of net, having a large inclosure with a narrow entrance into which fish are directed by wings spreading outward.
  • n. A certain specified weight; especially, a legal standard consisting of an established number of ounces.
  • n. A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4.86. There is no coin known by this name, but the gold sovereign is of the same value.
  • intransitive v. To strike heavy blows; to beat.
  • intransitive v. To make a jarring noise, as in running.
  • transitive v. To strike repeatedly with some heavy instrument; to beat.
  • transitive v. To comminute and pulverize by beating; to bruise or break into fine particles with a pestle or other heavy instrument.
  • transitive v. To confine in, or as in, a pound; to impound.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To weigh.
  • To wager a pound on.
  • To shut up in a pound; impound; confine as in a pound; hence, to imprison; confine.
  • Figuratively, to keep within narrow limits; cramp; restrain.
  • To form into pounds, bins, or compartments.
  • To beat; strike as with a heavy instrument and with repeated blows; pommel.
  • To inflict; strike: as, to pound blows.
  • To pulverize; break into fine pieces by striking with a heavy instrument; crush; reduce to powder.
  • To strike repeated blows; hammer continuously.
  • To walk with heavy steps; plod laboriously or heavily.
  • n. A fundamental unit of weight or mass.
  • n. A money of account, consisting of 20 shillings, or 240 pence, originally equivalent to a pound weight of silver (or of the alloy used).
  • n. A balance.
  • n. An inclosure, maintained by authority, for confining cattle or other beasts when taken trespassing, or going at large in violation of law; a pinfold. Pounds were also used for the deposit of goods seized by distress.
  • n. A pond.
  • n. In a canal, the level portion between two locks.
  • n. A pound-net; also, either one, inner or outer, of the compartments of such a net, or the inclosure of a gang of nets in which the fish are finally entrapped. See cut under pound-net.
  • n. A blow; a forcible thrust given to an object, thus generally occasioning a noise or report; also, the sound thus produced.
  • n. A compartment in an abattoir in which animals can be kept until they are slaughtered.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. 16 ounces avoirdupois
  • n. United States writer who lived in Europe; strongly influenced the development of modern literature (1885-1972)
  • n. the basic unit of money in Great Britain and Northern Ireland; equal to 100 pence
  • v. strike or drive against with a heavy impact
  • v. place or shut up in a pound
  • n. the basic unit of money in Cyprus; equal to 100 cents
  • n. a nontechnical unit of force equal to the mass of 1 pound with an acceleration of free fall equal to 32 feet/sec/sec
  • n. a unit of apothecary weight equal to 12 ounces troy
  • v. move rhythmically
  • v. shut up or confine in any enclosure or within any bounds or limits
  • v. break down and crush by beating, as with a pestle
  • v. hit hard with the hand, fist, or some heavy instrument
  • n. the act of pounding (delivering repeated heavy blows)
  • n. the basic unit of money in Syria; equal to 100 piasters
  • n. the basic unit of money in the Sudan; equal to 100 piasters
  • n. the basic unit of money in Egypt; equal to 100 piasters
  • v. move heavily or clumsily
  • n. the basic unit of money in Lebanon; equal to 100 piasters
  • n. a symbol for a unit of currency (especially for the pound sterling in Great Britain)
  • n. formerly the basic unit of money in Ireland; equal to 100 pence
  • n. a public enclosure for stray or unlicensed dogs
  • v. partition off into compartments

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, from Old English pund, from West Germanic *punda-, from Latin (lībra) pondō, (a pound) by weight; see (s)pen- in Indo-European roots.
Middle English pounden, alteration of pounen, from Old English pūnian.
Middle English, from Old English pund-, enclosure (as in pundfall, pen).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English, from Old English pund ("a pound, weight"), from Proto-Germanic *pundan (“pound, weight”), an early borrowing from Latin pondō ("by weight"), ablative form of pondus ("weight"), from Proto-Indo-European *pend-, *spend- (“to pull, stretch”). Cognate with Dutch pond, German Pfund, Swedish pund.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English *pound, pond, from Old English *pund (“an inclosure”), attested by pyndan ("to enclose, shut up, dam, impound"). Compare also Old English pynd ("a cistern, lake").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From an alteration of earlier poun, pown, from Middle English pounen, from Old English pūnian ("to pound, beat, bray, bruise, crush"), from Proto-Germanic *pūnōnan (“to break to pieces, pulverise”). Related to Saterland Frisian Pün ("debris, fragments"), Dutch puin ("debris, fragments, rubbish"), Low German pun ("fragments"). Perhaps influenced by Etymology 2 Middle English *pound, pond, from Old English *pund, pynd, in relation to the hollow mortar for pounding with the pestle.

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Some people are very patient with me:

    Dear bilby,

    > How do I change interface to metric? Pounds are where we keep stray dogs.

    We don't support metric at the moment -- it's on the todo list. Sorry about that.

    Steve S.

    October 28, 2009