Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To hit sharply, as with a hand, fist, weapon, or implement.
  • intransitive verb To inflict (a blow).
  • intransitive verb To penetrate or pierce.
  • intransitive verb To collide with or crash into.
  • intransitive verb To cause to come into violent or forceful contact.
  • intransitive verb To thrust (a weapon, for example) in or into someone or something.
  • intransitive verb To damage or destroy, as by forceful contact.
  • intransitive verb To make a military attack on; assault.
  • intransitive verb To afflict suddenly, as with a disease or impairment.
  • intransitive verb To cause to become suddenly in a certain way.
  • intransitive verb To snap at or seize (a bait).
  • intransitive verb To hook (a fish that has taken the bait) by a pull on the line.
  • intransitive verb To wound by biting. Used especially of a snake.
  • intransitive verb To form by stamping, printing, or punching.
  • intransitive verb To produce or play by manipulating strings or keys.
  • intransitive verb To indicate by a percussive or chiming sound.
  • intransitive verb To produce as if by playing a musical instrument.
  • intransitive verb To produce by friction or a blow.
  • intransitive verb To produce flame, light, or a spark by friction.
  • intransitive verb To remove or separate suddenly, as with a blow.
  • intransitive verb To eliminate or expunge.
  • intransitive verb To come upon (a mineral deposit) by effort; discover.
  • intransitive verb To come to; reach or attain.
  • intransitive verb To fall upon; shine on.
  • intransitive verb To become audible to.
  • intransitive verb To affect keenly or forcibly; impress.
  • intransitive verb To enter the mind of.
  • intransitive verb To cause (a strong emotion) to penetrate deeply.
  • intransitive verb To affect or overcome with strong emotion.
  • intransitive verb To make and confirm the terms of (a bargain).
  • intransitive verb To achieve (a balance, for example) by careful consideration.
  • intransitive verb To position one's body in (a pose, for example); assume.
  • intransitive verb To haul down (a mast or sail).
  • intransitive verb To lower (a flag or sail) in salute or surrender.
  • intransitive verb To lower (cargo) into a hold.
  • intransitive verb To remove (theatrical properties, a set, or technical equipment) from a stage.
  • intransitive verb To dismantle and pack up for departure.
  • intransitive verb To undertake a strike against (an employer).
  • intransitive verb To level or even (a measure, as of grain).
  • intransitive verb To smooth or shape with a strickle.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English striken, from Old English strīcan, to stroke; see streig- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English strīcan, from Proto-Germanic *strīkanan. Cognate with Dutch strijken, German streichen and streiken, Icelandic strýkja, strýkva.

Examples

Comments

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  • Contronymic in the sense: hit vs. miss (as in "strike three").

    January 27, 2007

  • An expression my sister uses - "Strike!" - to convey surprise or amazement.

    August 27, 2007

  • Writers, producers

    May be nearing a new pact.

    This is a good thing?

    -- Producers Say Writers Could Return on Monday, The New York Times, Feb. 9, 2008

    February 9, 2008

  • This is also a phrase that lighting people (on stage or more often film) will shout to warn everyone before turning on bright lights.

    May 14, 2008