Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A personal record of occurrences, experiences, and reflections kept on a regular basis; a diary.
  • noun An official record of daily proceedings, as of a legislative body.
  • noun Nautical A ship's log.
  • noun A daybook.
  • noun A book of original entry in a double-entry system, listing all transactions and indicating the accounts to which they belong.
  • noun A newspaper.
  • noun A periodical presenting articles on a particular subject.
  • noun The part of a machine shaft or axle supported by a bearing.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • pret. and pp. journaled or journalled, ppr. journaling or journalling.
  • In machinery, to insert, as a shaft, in a journal-bearing.
  • To enter in a journal.
  • Daily; quotidian; diurnal.
  • noun A diary or daily record; an account of daily transactions or events; a book or paper containing such an account or made for entering it; any record of a series of transactions.
  • noun Specifically— In bookkeeping by double entry: A book in which every particular article or charge is distinctly entered from the day-book or blotter under each day's date, as a “debit” to a person and “credit” to a thing, or vice versa, and thus systematized or classed to facilitate posting to the ledger.
  • noun A day-book.
  • noun Nautical, a daily register of the ship's course and distance, the winds, the weather, and other circumstances
  • noun A newspaper or other periodical published daily; hence, any publication issued at successive periods containing reports or records of current events of any kind.
  • noun In mining, a record of the strata passed through in sinking.
  • noun A day's work or travel; a journey.
  • noun In machinery, that part of a shaft or axle which rests in the bearings. See first cut under axle-box.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective obsolete Daily; diurnal.
  • noun A diary; an account of daily transactions and events.
  • noun (Bookkeeping) A book of accounts, in which is entered a condensed and grouped statement of the daily transactions.
  • noun (Naut.) A daily register of the ship's course and distance, the winds, weather, incidents of the voyage, etc.
  • noun (Legislature) The record of daily proceedings, kept by the clerk.
  • noun A newspaper published daily
  • noun Obs. & R. That which has occurred in a day; a day's work or travel; a day's journey.
  • noun (Mach.) That portion of a rotating piece, as a shaft, axle, spindle, etc., which turns in a bearing or box. See Illust. of Axle box.
  • noun (Mach.) the carrier of a journal; the box in which the journal of a shaft, axle, or pin turns.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective obsolete Daily.
  • noun A diary or daily record of a person, organization, vessel etc.; daybook.
  • noun A newspaper or magazine dealing with a particular subject.
  • noun engineering The part of a shaft or axle that rests on bearings.
  • noun computing A chronological record of changes made to a database or other system; along with a backup or image copy that allows recovery after a failure or reinstatement to a previous time; a log.
  • verb To archive or record something.
  • verb To scrapbook.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a periodical dedicated to a particular subject
  • noun the part of the axle contained by a bearing
  • noun a ledger in which transactions have been recorded as they occurred
  • noun a daily written record of (usually personal) experiences and observations
  • noun a record book as a physical object

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, breviary, from Old French, daily, breviary, from Late Latin diurnālis, daily; see diurnal.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French journal ("daily"), from Latin diurnālis, from diurnus ("of the day"), from diēs ("day"). Cognate with diurnal.

Examples

  • The journal appears to have been abbreviated by Purchas, as he tells us it was _gathered out of his larger journal_.

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 09 Arranged in Systematic Order: Forming a Complete History of the Origin and Progress of Navigation, Discovery, and Commerce, by Sea and Land, from the Earliest Ages to the Present Time

  • Subscribe to comments with RSS. our journal is aptly named

    Polygraphs « Gerry Canavan

  • I'm so glad your journal is as far as I delve into the Who fandom.

    I CAN'T BELIEVE I'M SAYING THIS...but...

  • There are many ways to do this: formal publications (a journal is already in the works … but we need to be sure we re-think what ‘journal’ means in this day and age); whitepapers; informal publications, like blogging or occasional symposia; and especially making use of the incredible knowledge-generation capacity of our community.

    inkblurt · Running for the Board & the future of the IAI

  • Part of a joint project between the Information Institute of Syracuse and ALA's Office for Information Technology Policy, the journal is a forum for the exchange of ideas relating to conversation-based theories as well as their applications in knowledge environments

    December 2007

  • Published twice yearly, the journal is an open access, online publication.

    September 2007

  • In a 1939 journal entry, recorded upon arriving in New York to attend the Horace Mann School for Boys, he wrote, I wish to say that this journal is a continual refreshing resource for my castle, which surrounds me; it keeps me aloof from teeming humanity; it keeps me in contact with myself.

    March 2007

  • In a 1939 journal entry, recorded upon arriving in New York to attend the Horace Mann School for Boys, he wrote, I wish to say that this journal is a continual refreshing resource for my castle, which surrounds me; it keeps me aloof from teeming humanity; it keeps me in contact with myself.

    Kerouac at the New York Public Library

  • Part of a joint project between the Information Institute of Syracuse and ALA's Office for Information Technology Policy, the journal is a forum for the exchange of ideas relating to conversation-based theories as well as their applications in knowledge environments

    Conversants

  • Dylan Hicks began previewing M-SPIFF films a couple of weeks ago and managed to watch 30 movies in 9 days; whether or not his journal is as useful as the usual alt-weekly mound of blurbs is debatable, but it is more fun.

    GreenCine Daily: City Pages. M-SPIFF.

Comments

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  • In France, a traditional unit of land area equal to the area that could be plowed in a day (from the French jour, "day"). The unit varied from one region to another but was about 0.3 to 0.45 hectare (0.75 to 1.1 acres). Similar to the juchart, once used in Switzerland and southern Germany.

    November 6, 2007

  • "In mining, a record of the strata passed through in sinking." --CD&C

    January 10, 2013

  • If you're sinking, and waving your arms abour screaming, it must be hard to write a journal.

    January 10, 2013