Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act of tying or binding.
  • n. A cord, wire, or bandage used for tying or binding.
  • n. A thread, wire, or cord used in surgery to close vessels or tie off ducts.
  • n. Something that unites; a bond.
  • n. A character, letter, or type, such as æ, combining two or more letters.
  • n. Music A group of notes intended to be played or sung as one phrase.
  • n. Music A curved line indicating such a phrase; a slur.
  • n. Music A passage of notes sung by repeating the same syllable.
  • n. Music A metal band that attaches the reed to the mouthpiece of the clarinet and related instruments.
  • transitive v. To ligate.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of tying or binding something.
  • n. A cord or similar thing used to tie something; especially the thread used in surgery to close a vessel or duct.
  • n. A character that visually combines multiple letters, such as æ, œ, ß or ij; also logotype. Sometimes called a typographic ligature.
  • n. A group of notes played as a phrase, or the curved line that indicates such a phrase.
  • n. A piece used to hold a reed to the mouthpiece on woodwind instruments.
  • v. To ligate; to tie.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of binding.
  • n. Anything that binds; a band or bandage.
  • n.
  • n. A thread or string for tying the blood vessels, particularly the arteries, to prevent hemorrhage.
  • n. A thread or wire used to remove tumors, etc.
  • n. The state of being bound or stiffened; stiffness.
  • n. Impotence caused by magic or charms.
  • n. A curve or line connecting notes; a slur.
  • n. A double character, or a type consisting of two or more letters or characters united, as æ, fi, ffl.
  • transitive v. To ligate; to tie.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Anything that serves for tying, binding, or uniting, as a cord or bandage; hence, any binding, restraining, or uniting agency or principle.
  • n. Specifically In surgery: A cord for tying a blood-vessel, particularly an artery, to prevent hemorrhage.
  • n. A cord or wire to remove tumors, etc., by strangulation.
  • n. The act of binding; ligation.
  • n. The state of being bound or consolidated.
  • n. Impotence supposed to be induced by magic.
  • n. In music: In medieval musical notation, one of various compound note-forms designed to indicate groups of two or more tones which were to be sung to a single syllable—that is, similar to a group of slurred notes in the modern notation. Ligatures are often difficult to decipher, on account of the doubtfulness not only of the pitch of the tones intended, but of their relative duration.
  • n. In modern musical notation, a tie or band; hence, a group of notes slurred together, intended to be sung at a single breath or to be played as a continuous phrase.
  • n. In contrapuntal music, a syncopation.
  • n. In printing and writing, a type or character consisting of or representing two or more letters or characters united.
  • To compress or tie by means of a ligature, in any sense; ligate.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the act of tying or binding things together
  • n. something used to tie or bind
  • n. thread used by surgeons to bind a vessel (as to constrict the flow of blood)
  • n. character consisting of two or more letters combined into one
  • n. a metal band used to attach a reed to the mouthpiece of a clarinet or saxophone
  • n. (music) a group of notes connected by a slur

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin ligātūra, from Latin ligātus, past participle of ligāre, to bind.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin ligātura, from Latin ligātus, past participle of ligāre ("to tie, bind"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • When the scion and the stock have been both chosen, they are cut slantingly, so that one may fit into the other; and care being taken that the bark and soft wood of the two unite, at least on one side, the two pieces are bound together, and the ligature is covered with what is called grafting clay, that is, a mixture of stiff clay, with a fourth part of fresh horse-dung, and a small quantity of cut hay.

    The Lady's Country Companion: or, How to Enjoy a Country Life Rationally

  • Once the reader figures out the notion of ligature itself thee are all manner of burbling connective pleasures.

    Donato Mancini, Ligatures

  • This description does not only comprehend the bowels, bones, tendons, veins, nerves, and arteries, but every muscle and every ligature, which is a composition of fibres, that are so many imperceptible tubes or pipes interwoven on all sides with invisible glands or strainers.

    The Coverley Papers

  • The ligature was their best hold then, the literature became their best hold later, when one of them committed an indiscretion, and they had to cut the old bond to accommodate the sheriff.

    Mark Twain`s speeches; with an introduction by William Dean Howells.

  • And since the latter current escapes from the arm by the opening made in one of the veins, there must of necessity be certain passages below the ligature, that is, towards the extremities of the arm through which it can come thither from the arteries.

    Part V

  • The ligature is a most satisfying immediate resource in stopping bleeding from an artery, but a septic ligature inevitably causes suppuration and almost inevitably leads to secondary hemorrhage.

    Old-Time Makers of Medicine The Story of The Students And Teachers of the Sciences Related to Medicine During the Middle Ages

  • To avoid these the ligature should be applied as low down on the vessel as possible, and, in point of fact, the operation called ligature of the third stage of the axillary is, anatomically speaking, really ligature of the brachial high up, and where there is room at all, there will be the less chance of secondary hæmorrhage, the greater the distance is between the ligature and the great subscapular branch.

    A Manual of the Operations of Surgery For the Use of Senior Students, House Surgeons, and Junior Practitioners

  • This description does not only comprehend the bowels, bones, tendons, veins, nerves and arteries, but every muscle and every ligature, which is a composition of fibres, that are so many imperceptible tubes or pipes interwoven on all sides with invisible glands or strainers.

    The Young Gentleman and Lady's Monitor, and English Teacher's Assistant

  • "The Crown says due to the nature of the act, namely a ligature strangulation and the necessity to address deterrence and denunciation a period of incarceration is necessary to preserve respect for the law," LoVecchio noted.

    Articles on National Review Online

  • In addition to being bludgeoned, she had been strangled with a "ligature," or some type of cord, the sources said.

    Boy, 14, charged with murder, rape in teacher's death at Md. detention center

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