Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The soft tissue of the body of a vertebrate, covering the bones and consisting mainly of skeletal muscle and fat.
  • noun Such tissue of an animal, used as food.
  • noun The surface or skin of the human body.
  • noun Fatty tissue.
  • noun Botany The pulpy, usually edible part of a fruit or vegetable.
  • noun The human body.
  • noun Sensual appetites.
  • noun Substance; reality.
  • intransitive verb To give substance or detail to; fill out. Often used with out:
  • intransitive verb To clean (a hide) of adhering flesh.
  • intransitive verb To encourage (a falcon, for example) to participate in the chase by feeding it flesh from a kill.
  • intransitive verb To plunge or thrust (a weapon) into flesh.
  • intransitive verb Archaic To inure (troops, for instance) to battle or bloodshed.
  • intransitive verb To become plump or fleshy; gain weight.
  • idiom (go the way of all flesh) To die.
  • idiom (go the way of all flesh) To come to an end.
  • idiom (in the flesh) Alive.
  • idiom (in the flesh) In person; present.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To feed full with flesh, and hence with fleshly enjoyments, spoil, etc.
  • To encourage by giving flesh to; initiate to the taste of flesh: with reference to the practice of training hawks and dogs by feeding them with the first game they take, or other flesh; hence, to introduce or incite to battle or carnage.
  • In leather manufacturing, to remove flesh, fat, and loose membrane from the flesh side of, as skins and hides.
  • To clothe with flesh; make fleshy.
  • noun A substance forming a large part of an animal body, consisting of the softer solids which constitute muscle and fat, as distinguished from the bones, the skin, the membranes, and the fluids; in the most restricted sense, muscular tissue alone.
  • noun Animal food, in distinction from vegetable; in the most restricted sense, the substance of beasts and fowls used as food, as distinguished from fish.
  • noun The body, as distinguished from the soul; the corporeal person.
  • noun Man, or the human race; mankind; humanity.
  • noun Man's animal or physical nature, as distinguished from or opposed to his moral or spiritual nature; the body as the seat of appetite: a Biblical use: as, to mortify the flesh.
  • noun Kindred; stock; family; near relative or relatives.
  • noun In botany, the soft cellular or pulpy substance of a fruit or vegetable, as distinguished from the kernel or core, skin, shell, etc.
  • noun In Scripture, to be under the control of the animal nature: opposed to spiritual.
  • Consisting of animal substance not fish: as, a flesh diet.
  • To become more fleshy, as one who has been ill and is convalescent: used with up.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The aggregate of the muscles, fat, and other tissues which cover the framework of bones in man and other animals; especially, the muscles.
  • noun Animal food, in distinction from vegetable; meat; especially, the body of beasts and birds used as food, as distinguished from fish.
  • noun The human body, as distinguished from the soul; the corporeal person.
  • noun The human eace; mankind; humanity.
  • noun Human nature.
  • noun In a good sense, tenderness of feeling; gentleness.
  • noun In a bad sense, tendency to transient or physical pleasure; desire for sensual gratification; carnality.
  • noun (Theol.) The character under the influence of animal propensities or selfish passions; the soul unmoved by spiritual influences.
  • noun Kindred; stock; race.
  • noun The soft, pulpy substance of fruit; also, that part of a root, fruit, and the like, which is fit to be eaten.
  • noun after the manner of man; in a gross or earthly manner.
  • noun human strength or aid.
  • noun See under Blood.
  • noun broth made by boiling flesh in water.
  • noun (Zoöl.) one of several species of flies whose larvæ or maggots feed upon flesh, as the bluebottle fly; -- called also meat fly, carrion fly, and blowfly. See Blowly.
  • noun animal food.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old English flǣsc.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English flǣsc, from Proto-Germanic *flaisk-, from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₁ḱ (“to tear, peel off”). Compare Old High German "fleisk" (German "Fleisch").

Examples

  • ” Paul, too, says, “Though we walk in the flesh, we do not war after the flesh” (2 Cor.x. 3), and “The life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God” (Gal. ii.

    Concerning Christian Liberty

  • Scrape the leftover pumpkin flesh from the skins, and remove the burnt, papery skins from the onions.

    Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's climate-friendly recipes

  • The word flesh made Eliza aware of the flecks of pink and cream paint that lingered on the portrait in the grooves of the artists final strokes.

    The Forgotten Garden

  • The word flesh made Eliza aware of the flecks of pink and cream paint that lingered on the portrait in the grooves of the artists final strokes.

    The Forgotten Garden

  • The word flesh made Eliza aware of the flecks of pink and cream paint that lingered on the portrait in the grooves of the artists final strokes.

    The Forgotten Garden

  • The word flesh made Eliza aware of the flecks of pink and cream paint that lingered on the portrait in the grooves of the artists final strokes.

    The Forgotten Garden

  • The word flesh made Eliza aware of the flecks of pink and cream paint that lingered on the portrait in the grooves of the artists final strokes.

    Kate Morton Ebook Collection

  • "Tom Brady & Janet" Bobby Moynihan, Channing Tatum, Jay Pharoah The phrase "flesh cube" almost got this into "The Good" all by itself.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • And perhaps if I substitute the word "flesh" for "meat" on a regular basis, I will become a vegetarian!

    Delia Lloyd: Make New Year's Resolutions (And Keep Them!)

  • And perhaps if I substitute the word "flesh" for "meat" on a regular basis, I will become a vegetarian!

    Delia Lloyd: Make New Year's Resolutions (And Keep Them!)

Comments

New comments are temporarily disabled while we update our database.

  • There is something very fleshy about this word.

    November 5, 2007

  • Flesh! Saw I Mimi wash self!

    October 18, 2008