Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The state of being fleshly; carnal passions and appetites.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The state of being fleshly; carnal passions and appetites.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun obsolete Indulgence in concerns of the flesh; carnality, bodily appetites.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From fleshly +‎ -ness.

Examples

  • But do the crusty clots and conglomerations of reds, earths, and lead-whites that meet you at close range deliver any particular insight into fleshliness, let alone "life" itself?

    The Way to All Flesh

  • Even so, my sorry fleshliness was strangely apt for a day which reminds us of who we are before God.

    Archive 2007-04-01

  • Even so, my sorry fleshliness was strangely apt for a day which reminds us of who we are before God.

    Holy Week

  • From the filthiness of low life, I dare say, but how about the elegant fleshliness of the previous school?

    Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 22, September, 1878

  • Stella Schump opened wide her eyes that she transcended the milky fleshliness and the fact that, when she walked rapidly, her cheeks quivered in slight but gelatinous fashion.

    Humoresque A Laugh on Life with a Tear Behind It

  • The skin flowed over her body with the cool fleshliness of a pink rose petal.

    Star-Dust

  • The battle against fleshliness in all its forms is a battle which has to be fought and won in every

    Religious Reality

  • ” For the brutal scrapes of eighteenth-century fiction the new romance, of Scott and Cooper, had substituted deeds of chivalrous doings; it had supplanted the blunt fleshliness of Fielding and Smollett by a chaste and courtly love.

    Chapter 3. Romances of Adventure. Section 1. Materials and Men

  • Every hint that Witla is no vestal, that he indulges his unchristian fleshliness, that he burns in the manner of I Corinthians, VII, 9, is uncovered to the moral inquisition.

    A Book of Prefaces

  • These two images in conjunction formed to his mind a ghastly group, and the more strenuously he fixed upon them such power of attention and thought as remained to him, the more he saw them increase according to a fantastic progression—the one in grace, in charm, in beauty, in luster; the other in horror; till, at last, Emeralds appeared to him as a star, and the gibbet as a huge fleshliness arm.

    I. Delirium. Book IX

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