Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of or relating to the body. synonym: bodily.
  • adjective Having a physiological basis or origin.
  • adjective Involving sexual interest or activity.
  • adjective Involving or characterized by vigorous or forceful bodily activity.
  • adjective Slang Involving or characterized by violence.
  • adjective Of or relating to material things.
  • adjective Of or relating to matter and energy or the sciences dealing with them, especially physics.
  • noun A physical examination.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Pertaining to physics or natural philosophy: as, physical science;, physical law.
  • Of or pertaining to material nature; in accordance with the laws of nature; relating to what is material and perceived by the senses; specifically, pertaining to the material part or structure of an organized being, as opposed to what is mental or moral; material; bodily: as, physical force; physical strength.
  • External; obvious to the senses; cognizable through a bodily or material organization: as, the physical characters of a mineral: opposed to chemical. See mechanical
  • Of or pertaining to physic, or the art of curing disease or preserving health, or one who professes or practises this art; of or pertaining to a physician.
  • In need of physic or of a physician; sick; ill.
  • Of or pertaining to the drugs or medicines used in the healing art; of use in curing disease or in preserving health; medicinal; remedial.
  • Purgative; cathartic.
  • Synonyms Corporal, Corporeal, etc. See bodily.
  • Chemical, etc. See mechanical.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Of or pertaining to nature (as including all created existences); in accordance with the laws of nature; also, of or relating to natural or material things, or to the bodily structure, as opposed to things mental, moral, spiritual, or imaginary; material; natural
  • adjective Of or pertaining to physics, or natural philosophy; treating of, or relating to, the causes and connections of natural phenomena
  • adjective Perceptible through a bodily or material organization; cognizable by the senses; external.
  • adjective obsolete Of or pertaining to physic, or the art of medicine; medicinal; curative; healing; also, cathartic; purgative.
  • adjective that part of astronomy which treats of the causes of the celestial motions; specifically, that which treats of the motions resulting from universal gravitation.
  • adjective training of the bodily organs and powers with a view to the promotion of health and vigor.
  • adjective (Med.) an examination of the bodily condition of a person.
  • adjective See under Geography.
  • adjective an indefinitely small portion of matter; a point conceived as being without extension, yet having physical properties, as weight, inertia, momentum, etc.; a material point.
  • adjective (Med.) the objective signs of the bodily state afforded by a physical examination.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Having to do with the body.
  • adjective Having to do with the material world.
  • adjective Involving bodily force.
  • adjective Having to do with physics.
  • noun Physical examination.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective according with material things or natural laws (other than those peculiar to living matter)
  • adjective characterized by energetic bodily activity
  • adjective concerned with material things
  • adjective relating to the sciences dealing with matter and energy; especially physics
  • adjective having substance or material existence; perceptible to the senses
  • adjective involving the body as distinguished from the mind or spirit
  • adjective impelled by physical force especially against resistance

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English phisical, medical, from Medieval Latin physicālis, from Latin physica, physics; see physics.]

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.