Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Theology Of or relating to the period after the fall of Adam and Eve.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Pertaining to anything which follows a lapse or failure.
  • adjective Christianity The state of being which followed the expulsion of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[post– + Latin lāpsus, fall; see lapse + –arian.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

post- (“after”) + lapsus (“of the fall”) + -arian (“of or pertaining to”)

Examples

  • Do we know, a priori, that it was impossible for God to have established with national Israel, a kind of postlapsarian, typological, pedagogical (a word frequently used by

    Heidelblog

  • Pleasure soon turns into the pain of postlapsarian knowledge, fury at her entrapment, and hatred of her consort, Pluto.

    Passion and Precision

  • Pure sex is paradisal, but we lost it; postlapsarian lovemaking is represented as shockingly inferior.

    Heroic Milton: Happy Birthday

  • The ones who took billion-dollar bites from the apple are suffering postlapsarian blues.

    THE FILM OF TOMORROW

  • Benjamin Black/John Banville's neo-noir, set in 1950s Ireland and America, conjures up a very postlapsarian world indeed, in which characters do evil in the purported service of some greater good.

    Christine Falls

  • So Christ reveals what the postlapsarian world is like and thankfully what it ought to be like.

    Just as art advances and elevates creation

  • But Alfric is the extreme signifier of Roman Catholicism's violent signified, whereas the novel's various misguided Protestants merely signify postlapsarian man's natural depravity.

    The Little Professor:

  • So Christ reveals what the postlapsarian world is like and thankfully what it ought to be like.

    Archive 2007-09-01

  • Benjamin Black/John Banville's neo-noir, set in 1950s Ireland and America, conjures up a very postlapsarian world indeed, in which characters do evil in the purported service of some greater good.

    The Little Professor:

  • But Alfric is the extreme signifier of Roman Catholicism's violent signified, whereas the novel's various misguided Protestants merely signify postlapsarian man's natural depravity.

    The Sisters of Soleure

Comments

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  • since it is one of the narrative's implications that the myth of the Fall can be understood as a fall into language, then the secondary, postlapsarian nature of language might be the very thing the Wake seeks to overcome by replacing it with a putative directness of communication that preceeded the Fall. intro to FW ix

    January 13, 2007

  • i always saw it as reflective consciousness; a loss of innocence in becoming aware that one is aware fits more perfectly. think of the Adamites or Brethren of the Free Spirits if you wish.

    February 2, 2009