Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of or relating to the mind; intellectual: mental powers.
  • adj. Executed or performed by the mind; existing in the mind: mental images of happy times.
  • adj. Of, relating to, or affected by a disorder of the mind.
  • adj. Intended for treatment of people affected with disorders of the mind.
  • adj. Of or relating to telepathy or mind reading.
  • adj. Slang Emotionally upset; crazed: got mental when he saw the dent in his new car.
  • adj. Offensive Slang Slang Mentally or psychologically disturbed.
  • adj. Of or relating to the chin.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or relating to the mind or an intellectual process.
  • adj. Insane, mad, crazy.
  • adj. Enjoyable; fun.
  • adj. Of or relating to the chin or median part of the lower jaw, genial.
  • adj. Of or relating to the chin-like or lip-like structure.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to the chin; genian
  • n. A plate or scale covering the mentum or chin of a fish or reptile.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to the mind; intellectual

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining to the mind; specifically, belonging to or characteristic of the intellect; intellectual: as, the mental powers or faculties; a mental state or condition; mental perception.
  • Done or performed by the mind; due to the action of the mind.
  • Relating to the mind; concerned with the nature, attributes, or phenomena of the human intellect: as, mental philosophy; mental sciences.
  • In anat, of or pertaining to the mentum or chin; genial.
  • n. An Oriental water-tight basket, having four ropes attached, by which two men raise water from a stream or cistern and discharge it into a trench for irrigation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of or relating to the mind
  • adj. of or relating to the chin- or liplike structure in insects and certain mollusks
  • adj. affected by a disorder of the mind
  • adj. of or relating to the chin or median part of the lower jaw
  • adj. involving the mind or an intellectual process

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin mentālis, from Latin mēns, ment-, mind; see men-1 in Indo-European roots.
From Latin mentum, chin; see men-2 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle French mental, from Late Latin mentālis ("of the mind, mental"), from Latin mēns ("the mind"). Also from Latin mentum ("the chin"), depending on usage. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Psychology, even so empirical a psychology as is possible of demonstration in western schools and colleges, evidences the fact that there is a far greater field of mental operation than is covered by the outer, or _mental_ consciousness.

    Cosmic Consciousness

  • Western Science, while performing a marvelous work in piling up fact after fact to support its newly-discovered theory of Evolution, in a way utterly unknown to the Oriental thinker who seeks after principles by mental concentration -- _within_ rather than without -- while actually proving by physical facts the _mental_ conceptions of the

    A Series of Lessons in Gnani Yoga

  • They need a positive mental (Int or Wis in this case) which follows the +physical/+mental/- anything format.

    EN World D&D / RPG News

  • Hearing the term mental block, she had always envisioned her barriers as just that, blocks—brightly colored and piled up in a wall between her and whatever she wanted to shut out.

    Dark Mirror

  • Like many agency heads, SAMHSA Administrator Pamela Hyde has abandoned use of the term mental "illness" and avoids the term "mental health" feeling these are too limiting to their agencies newly formed expansive mission.

    DJ Jaffe: Improve Care For Mentally Ill: Eliminate Mental Health Agencies

  • Dr. ALLEN FRANCES (Psychiatrist): Over the course of time, we've become looser and looser in applying the term mental disorder to the expectable aches and pains and sufferings of everyday life.

    Is Emotional Pain Necessary?

  • Clay Shirky used (coined?) the term mental transaction costs to describe the problem with using micropayments (small payments to download articles or music).

    EconLog: Behavioral Economics and Rationality Archives

  • Excerpt: The term mental retardation was supposed to be an improvement.

    Archive 2007-01-01

  • Primitive personality disorder PPD is the term mental health professionals use to describe this set of characteristics.

    Archive 2006-10-01

  • And then there's "Primitive personality disorder PPD is the term mental health professionals use to describe this set of characteristics."

    I can't get Junius Wilson out of my mind

Comments

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  • The Office, in contrast, and I might have chosen other examples such as I’m Alan Partridge or The League of Gentlemen, is, if only obliquely monumental though avowedly anti-sentimental, certainly ‘mental’ in at least three senses of the word. Firstly, it is cerebral. Secondly, it is anarchic. Thirdly, it is angry.”
    —Peter Stear, Mockumentalism: Re-Casting the Void in Contemporary British TV Comedy

    January 10, 2010

  • They let Lisa go blind
    The world was at her feet and she was looking down
    They let Lisa go blind
    But everyone she knew thought she was beautiful
    Only slightly mental
    Beautiful, only temperamental.


    (Beautiful, by Belle and Sebastian)

    August 24, 2008