transcendental love

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Philosophy Concerned with the a priori or intuitive basis of knowledge as independent of experience.
  • adj. Philosophy Asserting a fundamental irrationality or supernatural element in experience.
  • adj. Surpassing all others; superior.
  • adj. Beyond common thought or experience; mystical or supernatural.
  • adj. Mathematics Of or relating to a real or complex number that is not the root of any polynomial that has positive degree and rational coefficients.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A transcendentalist.
  • adj. Concerned with the a priori or intuitive basis of knowledge, independent of experience.
  • adj. Superior, surpassing all others.
  • adj. Extraordinary.
  • adj. Mystical or supernatural.
  • adj. Of, or relating to a number that is not the root of any polynomial that has positive degree and rational coefficients.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Supereminent; surpassing others.
  • adj. In the Kantian system, of or pertaining to that which can be determined a priori in regard to the fundamental principles of all human knowledge. What is transcendental, therefore, transcends empiricism; but is does not transcend all human knowledge, or become transcendent. It simply signifies the a priori or necessary conditions of experience which, though affording the conditions of experience, transcend the sphere of that contingent knowledge which is acquired by experience.
  • adj. Vaguely and ambitiously extravagant in speculation, imagery, or diction.
  • n. A transcendentalist.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Same as transcendent, 1.
  • In philosophy: In Aristotelian philosophy, extending beyond the bounds of a single category.
  • In Cartesian philosophy, predicable both of body and of spirit.
  • Pertaining to the existence in experience of a priori elements; a priori. This is chiefly a Kantian term, but was also used by Dugald Stewart. See Kantianism, category, a priori.
  • In Schellingistic philosophy, explaining matter and all that is objective as a product of subjective mind.
  • Abstrusely speculative; beyond the reach of ordinary, every-day, or common thought and experience; hence, vague; obscure; fantastic; extravagant.
  • Not capable of being produced by the algebraical operations of addition, multiplication, involution, and their inverse operations. The commonest transcendental functions are e, log x, sin x, etc.
  • Knowledge a priori.
  • The value of a transcendental function.
  • A first principle.
  • n. A transcendent conception, such as thing, something, one, true. good.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. existing outside of or not in accordance with nature
  • adj. of or characteristic of a system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical and material

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "I apply the term transcendental to all knowledge which is not so much occupied with objects as with the mode of our cognition of these objects, so far as this mode of cognition is possible a priori."

    Aesthetical Essays of Frederich Schiller

  • I apply the term transcendental to all knowledge which is not so much occupied with objects as with the mode of our cognition of these objects, so far as this mode of cognition is possible a priori.

    The Critique of Pure Reason

  • What struck me in his words was that what he defined as "transcendental and important" was not only the time he spent with his family and friends.

    Antonio Lucio: "Cuando un amigo se va" (When A Friend Leaves)

  • Several hundred people completed the combined inventory, and when we reanalyzed the results, we found that a distinct and meaningful new time perspective, which we called the transcendental future, had emerged.

    The Time Paradox

  • He suspected that the judge's interview with his niece might have brought to light some of her new ideas, and he knew the judge's opinion of all that class of thought which he termed transcendental; but however ironical might be the reference in the boat's name, he would not have gone to the trouble of having it lettered thereon without a kindly intent.

    The Opened Shutters

  • The act whereby I compare my representations with the faculty of cognition which originates them, and whereby I distinguish whether they are compared with each other as belonging to the pure understanding or to sensuous intuition, I term transcendental reflection.

    The Critique of Pure Reason

  • As Ray Brassier's project, which he describes as a transcendental nihilism, has been a singular influence on English language reception of Laruelle's project I at first assumed there was some kind of kenotic element to this phrase.

    An und für sich

  • The very fact of my own phenomenology, combined with my undeniable intuition that computers lack awareness and the vacuity of emergentist solutions, convinces me that something transcendental is going on.

    Aiguy's Computer

  • What do you call transcendental knowledge, and what immanent?

    Essays of Schopenhauer

  • A large proportion of our writers are devoted to what you would here term transcendental thought, a kind of literature which lies between poetry and music, which awakens a feeling of ecstasy, and gives, as it were, wings to the soul.

    Strange Visitors

Comments

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  • You'll want order, sequence, categories. I sympathise. But the trinity of fuckkilleat collapses distinctions, swipes aside the apparatus separating this from that and introduces with the transcendental equivalent of a Gallic shrug - a completely new experience. From "The Last Werewolf" by Glen Duncan.

    March 18, 2012