Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A lump or chunk, especially of earth or clay.
  • noun Earth or soil.
  • noun A dull, stupid person; a dolt.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • A dialectal variant of clothe.
  • noun A butchers' term for a cut of beef from the fore quarter opposite the cross-rib.
  • noun Any lump or mass; sometimes, a concreted mass; a clot.
  • noun Specifically A lump of earth, or earth and turf; a lump of clay.
  • noun In coal-mining, indurated clay: the equivalent of bind.
  • noun A stretch of ground or turf; earth; soil.
  • noun Anything earthy, base, and vile; poetically, the body of man in comparison with his soul: as, “this corporeal clod,”
  • noun A dull, gross, stupid fellow; a dolt.
  • noun A bait used in fishing for eels, consisting of a bunch of lobworms or earthworms strung on worsted yarn: also called a bob. See clod-fishing.
  • To pelt with clods or stones.
  • To form into clods.
  • To cover with earth, as seeds; harrow.
  • To confine in what is earthy and base, as the soul in the body.
  • To throw with violence.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To pelt with clods.
  • transitive verb Scot. To throw violently; to hurl.
  • intransitive verb To collect into clods, or into a thick mass; to coagulate; to clot. See clot.
  • noun A lump or mass, especially of earth, turf, or clay.
  • noun The ground; the earth; a spot of earth or turf.
  • noun That which is earthy and of little relative value, as the body of man in comparison with the soul.
  • noun A dull, gross, stupid fellow; a dolt.
  • noun A part of the shoulder of a beef creature, or of the neck piece near the shoulder. See Illust. of Beef.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun a lump of something, especially of earth or clay
  • noun a stupid person; a dolt
  • verb transitive To pelt with clods.
  • verb transitive, Scotland To throw violently; to hurl.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an awkward stupid person
  • noun a compact mass

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, variant of clot, lump; see clot.]

Examples

  • This CFR-Bilderberger owned clod is just another useful idiot for the New World Order.

    Think Progress » Hagel: ‘Things Are Worse Off In The Middle East Today Than They Were Three Years Ago’

  • Make him ask forgiveness of Guy; and then, "while little French birds were singing rondels, and as peasants bent over their hoes in clod-like attitudes, or leaned upon their spades to listen to the Angelus, the monk pronounced the words that made Blanche and Guy husband and wife, — or rather, wife and husband."

    How to Write a Novel for the Masses

  • Make him ask forgiveness of Guy; and then, "while little French birds were singing rondels, and as peasants bent over their hoes in clod-like attitudes, or leaned upon their spades to listen to the Angelus, the monk pronounced the words that made Blanche and Guy husband and wife, — or rather, wife and husband."

    How to Write a Novel for the Masses

  • Why should such gentle hands and feet spend their strength in clod-breaking, when rough ones are at command?

    Queechy

  • It's true that I haven't heard the word to which Mr Denby is referring -- we'll call it "clod" -- spill from the mouth of an actual American person, as opposed to a movie character, whereas in Britain you need only reach for the last tube of Werther's Originals in the shop to be branded a clod by the seething shopper who's next in line.

    New Statesman

  • It's true that I haven't heard the word to which Mr Denby is referring -- we'll call it "clod" -- spill from the mouth of an actual American person, as opposed to a movie character, whereas in Britain you need only reach for the last tube of Werther's Originals in the shop to be branded a clod by the seething shopper who's next in line.

    New Statesman

  • It's true that I haven't heard the word to which Mr Denby is referring -- we'll call it "clod" -- spill from the mouth of an actual American person, as opposed to a movie character, whereas in Britain you need only reach for the last tube of Werther's Originals in the shop to be branded a clod by the seething shopper who's next in line.

    New Statesman

  • It's true that I haven't heard the word to which Mr Denby is referring -- we'll call it "clod" -- spill from the mouth of an actual American person, as opposed to a movie character, whereas in Britain you need only reach for the last tube of Werther's Originals in the shop to be branded a clod by the seething shopper who's next in line.

    New Statesman

  • Rick Schmidt’s method of cooking shoulder clod is in Peace, Love, & Barbecue.

    You gonna eat that? Random musings on food and life in Orange County, California » Don’t mess with Texas

  • First, before getting to the vermilion itself by methods of treatment, they dig out what is called the clod, an ore like iron, but rather of a reddish colour and covered with a red dust.

    The Ten Books on Architecture

Comments

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  • "A bait used in fishing for eels, consisting of a bunch of lobworms or earthworms strung on worsted yarn: also called a bob. See clod-fishing."

    --Cent. Dict.

    July 13, 2012

  • I grew up hearing people being called clodhoppers. I had no idea that the word had anything to do with eels, especially since eels are uncommon in Missouri.

    Interesting fact: All eels in Missouri are female.

    link

    July 13, 2012

  • That's an awesome fact, frog!

    July 13, 2012

  • On Missouri eels revelation in frogapplause comment:

    Hence Miss-Ouri?

    Miss-Issippi must have 'Ms.ed the boat'?

    July 13, 2012