Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A stupid fellow; one who blunders.
  • noun A dipterous insect of the family Simuliidæ; a black-fly.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A stupid, blundering fellow.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Someone who habitually makes mistakes or blunders

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • [99] -- Tarantado is a Spanish vulgarism meaning "blunderhead,"

    The Social Cancer

  • “What a blunderhead I am!” cries the Colonel, with delight on his countenance, spite of his professed repentance.

    The Newcomes

  • In fact, a bigger blunderhead, excepting in regard to certain matters, of which this was not one, probably did not exist.

    Love at Paddington

  • His son Luigi certainly distressed him; but it was even worse to think that -- whilst Luigi, with his great intelligence and many remaining fine qualities, was nothing at all -- Sacco, on the other hand, Sacco, blunderhead and ever-famished battener that he was, had not merely slipped into parliament, but was now, it seemed, on the point of securing office!

    The Three Cities Trilogy: Rome, Volume 2

  • His son Luigi certainly distressed him; but it was even worse to think that -- whilst Luigi, with his great intelligence and many remaining fine qualities, was nothing at all -- Sacco, on the other hand, Sacco, blunderhead and ever-famished battener that he was, had not merely slipped into parliament, but was now, it seemed, on the point of securing office!

    The Three Cities Trilogy: Rome, Complete

  • His son Luigi certainly distressed him; but it was even worse to think that -- whilst Luigi, with his great intelligence and many remaining fine qualities, was nothing at all -- Sacco, on the other hand, Sacco, blunderhead and ever-famished battener that he was, had not merely slipped into parliament, but was now, it seemed, on the point of securing office!

    The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete Lourdes, Rome and Paris

  • The farmer knows what to do with it, stops every leak, turns all the streamlets to one reservoir, and decants wine: but a blunderhead comes out of Cornhill, tries his hand, and it all leaks away.

    The Conduct of Life (1860)

  • "What a blunderhead I am!" cries the Colonel, with delight on his countenance, spite of his professed repentance.

    The Newcomes

  • "What do you suppose I cared whether I waked you or not, you blunderhead.

    Desk and Debit or, The Catastrophes of a Clerk

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