Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To seize with rapacity, especially food; prey upon; ravage. See ravined.
  • To subject to rapine or ravage; obtain or take possession of by violence.
  • To devour with great eagerness; eat with voracity; swallow greedily.
  • To prey with rapacity; show rapacity.
  • noun A bird of the larger species of the genus Corvus, having the feathers of the throat lanceolate and distinct from one another.
  • noun A kind of fish. See sea-raven and Hemitripteridæ.
  • Black as a raven; evenly and glossily or lustrously black: as, raven locks.
  • noun Plunder; rapine; robbery; rapacity; furious violence.
  • noun Plunder; prey; food obtained with rapacity.
  • noun Applied in Australia to one of the larger crows, Corvus coronoides.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Of the color of the raven; jet black
  • noun Rapine; rapacity.
  • noun Prey; plunder; food obtained by violence.
  • transitive verb To obtain or seize by violence.
  • transitive verb To devour with great eagerness.
  • noun (Zoöl.) A large black passerine bird (Corvus corax), similar to the crow, but larger, and has a harsh, loud call. It is native of the northern parts of Europe, Asia and America, and is noted for its sagacity.
  • noun (Zoöl.) the cormorant.
  • intransitive verb To prey with rapacity; to be greedy; to show rapacity.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Rapine; rapacity.
  • noun Prey; plunder; food obtained by violence.
  • verb archaic To obtain or seize by violence.
  • verb To devour with great eagerness.
  • verb To prey with rapacity; to be greedy; to show rapacity.
  • noun A common name for several, generally large and lustrous black species of birds in the genus Corvus, especially the common raven, Corvus corax.
  • adjective Of the color of the raven; jet-black

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb prey on or hunt for
  • verb feed greedily
  • verb eat greedily
  • verb obtain or seize by violence
  • noun large black bird with a straight bill and long wedge-shaped tail

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French raviner ("rush, seize by force"), itself from ravine ("rapine"), from Latin rapina ("plundering, loot"), itself from rapere ("seize, plunder, abduct")

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English hræfn, from Proto-Germanic *hrabnaz (compare Dutch raaf, German Rabe, Danish ravn), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱorh₂- (compare Middle Irish crú, Latin corvus, Lithuanian šárka ("magpie"), Serbo-Croatian svrȁka ‘id.’, Ancient Greek κόραξ (kórax)), from *ḱer, *ḱor (compare Latin crepare ‘to creak, crack’, Sanskrit kṛ́patē).

Examples

Comments

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  • Nevermore!

    February 1, 2007

  • I never saw a purple cow

    But if I were to see one

    Would the probability ravens are black

    Have a better chance to be one?

    -Gelett Burgess

    June 18, 2007

  • For those wondering, the poem must be a reference to Hempel's Paradox.

    I thought WeirdNet usually put noun definitions first, but here it's gone for verb definitions—because there are more of them, maybe? Or just because it's WeirdNet?

    August 15, 2008

  • Personally, I think Professor Hempel could benefit by deepening his knowledge of the work of that eminent clergyman, Thomas Bayes.

    Because, as George Box has famously noted:

    "There's no theorem like Bayes Theoreom, like no theorem I know ....

    Everything about it is exci-i-ting...."

    and so on

    and so forth

    August 15, 2008

  • *wondering what Buenos Aires has done to sionnach*

    August 15, 2008

  • *nods gravely*

    August 15, 2008

  • sionnach, do you remember the scarf file?

    September 8, 2008

  • "The Raven" as a limerick

    There once was a girl named Lenore

    And a bird and a bust and a door

    And a guy with depression

    And a whole lot of questions

    And the bird always says "Nevermore."

    (from Famous Poems Rewritten as Limericks)

    October 25, 2008

  • Ha, I like them! Especially:

    There once was a poet named Will

    Who tramped his way over a hill

    And was speechless for hours

    Over some stupid flowers

    This was years before TV, but still.

    October 25, 2008

  • Spy lingo for a male agent who uses the honey trap to entrap women into becoming spies. A spy gigolo, if you will.

    August 26, 2009