Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A structure, such as a pier, that projects into a body of water to influence the current or tide or to protect a harbor or shoreline from storms or erosion.
  • n. A wharf.
  • adj. Resembling jet, as in texture.
  • adj. Of the color jet; black: jetty tresses.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Made of jet, or like jet in color.
  • n. A structure of wood or stone extended into the sea to influence the current or tide, or to protect a harbor or beach.
  • n. A wharf or dock extending from the shore.
  • n. A part of a building that jets or projects beyond the rest, and overhangs the wall below.
  • v. To jut out; to project.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Made of jet, or like jet in color.
  • n. A part of a building that jets or projects beyond the rest, and overhangs the wall below.
  • n. A wharf or pier extending from the shore.
  • n. A structure of wood or stone extended into the sea to influence the current or tide, or to protect a harbor; a mole.
  • intransitive v. To jut out; to project.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A projecting part of a building, especially a part that projects so as to overhang the wall below, as the upper story of a timber house, a bay-window, etc. See extract under jetty, intransitive verb
  • n. A projection of stone, brick, wood, or other material (but generally formed of piles), affording a convenient place for landing from and discharging vessels or boats, or serving as a protection against the encroachment or assault of the waves; also, a pier of stone or other material projecting from the bank of a stream obliquely to its course, for the purpose of directing the current upon an obstruction to be removed, as a bed of sand or gravel, or to deflect it from a bank which it tends to undermine.
  • To jut; project.
  • To make a jetty.
  • Jetting, or jutting out; swelling.
  • Made of jet.
  • Black as jet.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a protective structure of stone or concrete; extends from shore into the water to prevent a beach from washing away

Etymologies

Middle English getti, jettie, from Old French jetee, from feminine past participle of jeter, to project, throw; see jet2.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
jet +‎ -y (Wiktionary)
From French jetée ‘pier, jetty, causeway’. Compare jet, jutty. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • From Gateway Of India to Mandwa jetty is about an hour by boat.

    At Mandwa Jetty « bollywoods most wanted photographerno1

  • Coolidge reminded us that the physical jetty is only part of the work, which is actually a triad of the "sculpture" in the landscape, an essay by Smithson, and a film documenting the project.

    Rebecca Taylor: Spiral Jetty: A Monument to Paradox & Transience

  • Her beautiful hands held a cup to the lips of the stranger; while her long hair, escaped from its bands, fell in jetty ringlets, and mingled with his silver locks.

    The Scottish Chiefs

  • [17 Venice.] of the gondoliers of former days, gliding about in jetty blackness.

    A Lady's Glimpse of the Late War in Bohemia

  • The jetty was the way it had always been—flat and solid and surrounded on three sides by water.

    Stones from the River

  • Moored at the jetty was another smaller boat, a worn but still serviceable launch, its peeling grey paint lending it a military air.

    A Rude Awakening

  • At the end of the jetty is a fixed light, seen within a radius of

    The South of France—East Half

  • On the jetty was the African crowd, shouting and jostling, some half-naked, and some strangely clad, Arabs from across the sea,

    The Explorer

  • Over the line of the jetty was the deep blue Adriatic, sweeping to the horizon, its nearer reaches dotted with brilliant sails, shining in every shade of red and yellow and ruddy brown.

    A Venetian June

  • Now within a few hundred yards of the mission-house there was a jetty, and at the end of the jetty was Her Majesty's gunboat _Badger_, a small schooner-rigged wooden vessel commanded by Lieutenant-Commander Muddle, one of the most irascible men that ever breathed, and who had sat on more Consuls than any one else in the service.

    A Memory Of The Southern Seas 1904

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.