Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A piled-up mass, as of snow or clouds; a heap.
  • noun A steep natural incline.
  • noun An artificial embankment.
  • noun The slope of land adjoining a body of water, especially adjoining a river, lake, or channel.
  • noun A large elevated area of a sea floor.
  • noun Games The cushion of a billiard or pool table.
  • noun The lateral inward tilting, as of a motor vehicle or an aircraft, in turning or negotiating a curve.
  • intransitive verb To border or protect with a ridge or embankment.
  • intransitive verb To pile up; amass.
  • intransitive verb To cover (a fire), as with ashes or fresh fuel, to ensure continued low burning.
  • intransitive verb To construct with a slope rising to the outside edge.
  • intransitive verb To tilt (an aircraft) laterally and inwardly in flight.
  • intransitive verb To tilt (a motor vehicle) laterally and inwardly when negotiating a curve.
  • intransitive verb Games To strike (a billiard ball) so that it rebounds from the cushion of the table.
  • intransitive verb Sports To play (a ball or puck) in such a way as to make it glance off a surface, such as a backboard or wall.
  • intransitive verb To rise in or take the form of a bank.
  • intransitive verb To tilt an aircraft or a motor vehicle laterally when turning.
  • noun A set of similar or matched things arranged in a row, especially.
  • noun A set of elevators.
  • noun A row of keys on a keyboard.
  • noun A bench for rowers in a galley.
  • noun A row of oars in a galley.
  • noun Printing The lines of type under a headline.
  • transitive verb To arrange or set up in a row.
  • noun A business establishment in which money is kept for saving or commercial purposes or is invested, supplied for loans, or exchanged.
  • noun The offices or building in which such an establishment is located.
  • noun The funds of a gambling establishment.
  • noun The funds held by a dealer or banker in certain games, especially gambling games.
  • noun The reserve pieces, cards, chips, or play money in some games, such as poker, from which the players may draw.
  • noun A supply or stock for future or emergency use.
  • noun Medicine A supply of human fluids or tissues, such as blood, sperm, or skin, that is stored in a facility for future use.
  • noun A place of safekeeping or storage.
  • intransitive verb To deposit in a bank.
  • intransitive verb To store for future use.
  • intransitive verb To transact business with a bank or maintain a bank account.
  • intransitive verb To operate a bank.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In lumbering, the logs cut or skidded above the amount required in a day and held over by the saw-crew or skidders, to be reported when the daily quota is not reached.
  • To fish on submarine banks, especially the Newfoundland Banks.
  • noun A money-dealer's table, counter, or shop.
  • noun A sum of money, especially a sum to draw upon, as in a loan-bank.
  • noun In games of chance, the amount or pile which the proprietor of the gaming-table, or the person who plays against all the others, has before him; the funds of a gaming establishment; a fund in certain games at cards: as, a faro-bank.
  • noun An institution for receiving and lending money.
  • noun The office in which the transactions of a banking company are conducted.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English banke, from French banque, from Old Italian banca, bench, moneychanger's table, from Old High German banc.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, of Scandinavian origin.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, bench, from Old French banc, from Late Latin bancus, of Germanic origin.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Middle English banke, from Old English hōbanca ("couch") and Old English banc ("bank, hillock, embankment"), from Proto-Germanic *bankô. Akin to Old Norse bakki ("elevation, hill").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English banke, from Middle French banque, from Old Italian banca ("counter, moneychanger's bench or table"), from Lombardic *bench, counter, from Proto-Germanic *bankiz (“bench, counter”), from Proto-Indo-European *bheg- (“to turn, curve, bend, bow”). Cognate with Old High German banc, banch ("counter, bench"), Old English banc, benc ("bench"). More at bench.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Middle English bank ("bank"), banke, from Old French banc ("bench"), from Frankish *bank. Akin to Old English benc ("bench").

Examples

  • ** Cash only, or bank to bank** I will not accept any Cashier check of any kind.

    NASIOC

  • The word bank reached new heights following the successful commercial enterprises of the East India Company.

    The English Is Coming!

  • The word bank reached new heights following the successful commercial enterprises of the East India Company.

    The English Is Coming!

  • It brings a whole new movie -- meaning to the term bank branch.

    CNN Transcript Jul 8, 2007

  • Early on, you find a alien watch that contains a journal to remind you of your quests, a map to show you where to go, an inventory showing quest items you have gathered, your word bank and other helpful items.

    USATODAY.com News

  • The word bank comes from "banco," the bench on which itinerant merchants traded.

    News

  • Even in countries like China, Japan, and Greece, where other words are used to capture related ideas for “banking,” the English word bank is freely recognized.xviii

    The English Is Coming!

  • As exhausting as this journey must have been for the word bank, it has served English-speakers well, and richly.

    The English Is Coming!

  • Even in countries like China, Japan, and Greece, where other words are used to capture related ideas for “banking,” the English word bank is freely recognized.xviii

    The English Is Coming!

  • As exhausting as this journey must have been for the word bank, it has served English-speakers well, and richly.

    The English Is Coming!

Comments

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  • Means "bench" in Dutch.

    July 13, 2009

  • Same origin, TBT.

    July 18, 2009