Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A building, place, or institution devoted to the acquisition, conservation, study, exhibition, and educational interpretation of objects having scientific, historical, or artistic value.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A building or institution dedicated to the acquisition, conservation, study, exhibition, and educational interpretation of objects having scientific, historical, cultural or artistic value.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A repository or a collection of natural, scientific, or literary curiosities, or of works of art.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A building or part of a building appropriated as a repository of things that have an immediate relation to literature, art, or science; especially and usually, a collection of objects in natural history, or of antiquities or curiosities.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a depository for collecting and displaying objects having scientific or historical or artistic value

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Latin Mūsēum, from Greek Mouseion, shrine of the Muses, from Mouseios, of the Muses, from Mousa, Muse; see men-1 in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin mūsēum ("library, study"), from Ancient Greek Μουσεῖον (Mouseîon), shrine of the Muses (Μοῦσα (Moûsa)).

Examples

Comments

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  • "With a kind of intellectual alchemy, relics that were once considered rubbish became precious collectibles. As traveling became more popular in the seventeenth century, going to see collections open to visitors became an integral part of travelers' itineraries. One enthusiast covering the breadth of Western Europe located 968 collections of antiquities alone. ... Bestiaries, herbariums, and lapidary exhibits abounded."

    --Joyce Appleby, Shores of Knowledge: New World Discoveries and the Scientific Imagination (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Co., 2013), p. 100

    December 28, 2016

  • Pro and mollusque, I thought of you when I read this book review.

    September 17, 2008

  • December 1, 2006