Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A path or way.
  • noun A particular way of acting or doing; manner.
  • noun A structure that can be swung, drawn, or lowered to block an entrance or a passageway.
  • noun An opening in a wall or fence for entrance or exit.
  • noun The structure surrounding such an opening, such as the monumental or fortified entrance to a palace or walled city.
  • noun A means of access.
  • noun A passageway, as in an airport terminal, through which passengers proceed when boarding or leaving an airplane.
  • noun A mountain pass.
  • noun The total paid attendance or admission receipts at a public event.
  • noun A device for controlling the passage of water or gas through a dam or conduit.
  • noun The channel through which molten metal flows into a shaped cavity of a mold.
  • noun Sports A passage between two upright poles through which a skier must go in a slalom race.
  • noun A logic gate.
  • transitive verb Chiefly British To confine (a student) to the grounds of a college as punishment.
  • transitive verb Electronics To select part of (a wave) for transmission, reception, or processing by magnitude or time interval.
  • transitive verb To furnish with a gate.
  • idiom (get the gate) To be dismissed or rejected.
  • idiom (give (someone) the gate) To discharge from a job.
  • idiom (give (someone) the gate) To reject or jilt.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An archaic or dialectal form of goat.
  • To place (a warp) in a loom ready for weaving.
  • To put (a machine, as a loom) in order to do its work properly.
  • To go.
  • noun A way; road; path; course.
  • noun Way; manner; mode of doing: used especially with all, this, thus, other, no, etc., in adverbial phrases.
  • noun In particular Way or manner of walking; walk; carriage. [In this use now spelled gait, and usually associated (erroneously) with the verb go. See the etymology, and gait.] Movement on a course or way; progress; procession; journey; expedition.
  • noun Room or opportunity for going forward; space to move in.
  • To supply with a gate.
  • In the English universities of Oxford and Cambridge, to punish by a restriction on customary liberty.
  • noun A passage or opening closed by a movable barrier (a door or gate in sense 3); a gateway: commonly used with reference to such barrier, and specifically for the entrance to a large inclosure or building, as a walled city, a fortification, a great church or palace, or other public monument.
  • noun Hence, any somewhat contracted or difficult means or avenue of approach or passage; a narrow opening or defile: as, the Iron Gates of the Danube.
  • noun A movable barrier consisting of a frame or solid structure of wood, iron, or other material, set on hinges or pivots in or at the end of a passage in order to close it.
  • noun The movable framework which shuts or opens a passage for water, as at the entrance to a dock or in a canal-lock.
  • noun In coal-mining, an underground road connecting a stall with a main road or inclined plane. Also called gate-road, gateway.
  • noun In founding:
  • noun One of various forms of channels or openings made in the sand or molds, through which the metal flows (pouring-gate), or by means of which access is had to it, either for skimming its surface (skimming-gate) or for other purposes.
  • noun The waste piece of metal cast in the gate.
  • noun A ridge in a casting which has to be sawn off.
  • noun In locksmithing, one of the apertures in the tumblers for the passage of the stub.
  • noun A sash or frame in which a saw is extended, to prevent buckling or bending.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun O. Eng. & Scot. A way; a path; a road; a street (as in Highgate).
  • noun O. Eng. & Scot. Manner; gait.
  • noun A large door or passageway in the wall of a city, of an inclosed field or place, or of a grand edifice, etc.; also, the movable structure of timber, metal, etc., by which the passage can be closed.
  • noun An opening for passage in any inclosing wall, fence, or barrier; or the suspended framework which closes or opens a passage. Also, figuratively, a means or way of entrance or of exit.
  • noun A door, valve, or other device, for stopping the passage of water through a dam, lock, pipe, etc.
  • noun (Script.) The places which command the entrances or access; hence, place of vantage; power; might.
  • noun In a lock tumbler, the opening for the stump of the bolt to pass through or into.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old Norse gata; see ghē- in Indo-European roots.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old English geat.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old Norse gata, from Proto-Germanic *gatōn. Cognate with Danish gade, Swedish gata, German Gasse ("lane").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English ġeat, from Proto-Germanic *gatan (“hole, opening”) (cf. Swedish/Dutch gat, Low German Gaat, Gööt), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰed-ye/o (“to defecate”) (cf. Albanian dhjes, Ancient Greek χέζω (khézō), Old Armenian ձետ (jet, "tail"), Avestan ... (zadah) 'rump').

Examples

Comments

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  • Contronymic in the sense: obstacle (gate out) vs. allowance in.

    January 27, 2007

  • passage from one Sephira to another, links between sephriot

    July 22, 2009

  • See also yett.

    January 25, 2016

  • n. The waste piece of metal cast in the opening; a sprue or sullage piece.

    March 16, 2016