Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The act of receiving.
  • noun The fact of being or having been received.
  • noun A quantity or amount received.
  • noun A written acknowledgment that a specified article, sum of money, or shipment of merchandise has been received.
  • noun A recipe.
  • intransitive verb To mark (a bill) as having been paid.
  • intransitive verb To give or write a receipt for (money paid or goods or services delivered).
  • intransitive verb To give a receipt.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To receive; harbor.
  • To give a receipt for; acknowledge in writing the payment of: as, to receipt a bill (usually by writing upon the bill “Received payment” and the creditor's signature).
  • noun A thing received; that which is received by transfer; the amount or quantity of what is received from other hands: as, the receipts of cotton at a port.
  • noun The act or state of receiving by transfer or transmission; a taking of that which is delivered or passed over; a getting or obtaining: as, the receipt of money or of a letter; he is in the receipt of a good income.
  • noun A written acknowledgment of having received something specified, with date, source, signature, and such other particulars as the case requires.
  • noun A formula or prescription for the making of something, or the production of some effect; a statement of that which is to be taken or done for some purpose: distinguished from recipe by the common restriction of that word to medical or related uses: as, a receipt for a pudding; a receipt for gaining popularity.
  • noun Reception; admittance; a granting of entrance or admission.
  • noun A. place for the reception of persons or things; a place where anything is received or taken in; a station or a receptacle for lodgment.
  • noun Power of receiving or taking in; extent of accommodation; fitness for holding or containing.
  • noun Synonyms Recipe, etc. See reception.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of receiving; reception.
  • noun obsolete Reception, as an act of hospitality.
  • noun obsolete Capability of receiving; capacity.
  • noun obsolete Place of receiving.
  • noun obsolete Hence, a recess; a retired place.
  • noun A formulary according to the directions of which things are to be taken or combined; a recipe.
  • noun A writing acknowledging the taking or receiving of goods delivered; an acknowledgment of money paid.
  • noun That which is received; that which comes in, in distinction from what is expended, paid out, sent away, and the like; -- usually in the plural.
  • noun See under Gross, a.
  • transitive verb To give a receipt for.
  • transitive verb To put a receipt on, as by writing or stamping.
  • intransitive verb To give a receipt, as for money paid.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The act of receiving, or the fact of having been received
  • noun obsolete The fact of having received a blow, injury etc.
  • noun in the plural A quantity or amount received; takings
  • noun A written acknowledgment that a specified article or sum of money has been received
  • noun A recipe, instructions, prescription
  • noun obsolete A receptacle
  • noun obsolete A revenue office
  • verb To give or write a receipt (for something)
  • verb To mark a bill as having been paid

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb mark or stamp as paid
  • noun the act of receiving
  • verb report the receipt of
  • noun an acknowledgment (usually tangible) that payment has been made

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English receite, from Old North French, from Medieval Latin recepta, medical prescription, money received, from Latin, feminine past participle of recipere, to receive; see receive.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Recorded since c.1386 as "statement of ingredients in a potion or medicine," from Anglo-Norman or Old Northern French receite "receipt, recipe" (1304), altered (by influence of receit "he receives," from Vulgar Latin *recipit) from Old French recete, from Old French receptus, past participle of recipere, itself from re- 'back' + cipere (an alteration of capere 'to take')

Examples

Comments

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  • "6. A formula or prescription for the making of something, or the production of some effect; a statement of that which is to be taken or done for some purpose: distinguished from recipe by the common restriction of that word to medical or related uses: as, a receipt for a pudding; a receipt for gaining popularity." --Cent. Dict.

    June 16, 2011