Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To distribute by or as if by measure; allot: mete out justice.
  • transitive v. Archaic To measure.
  • n. A boundary line; a limit.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A boundary or other limit; a boundary-marker; mere.
  • v. To measure.
  • v. To dispense, measure (out), allot (especially punishment, reward etc.).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Meat.
  • v. To meet.
  • v. To dream; also impersonally.
  • transitive v. To find the quantity, dimensions, or capacity of, by any rule or standard; to measure.
  • intransitive v. To measure.
  • n. Measure; limit; boundary; -- used chiefly in the plural, and in the phrase metes and bounds.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To ascertain the quantity, dimensions, extent, or capacity of, by comparison with a standard; measure.
  • To distribute or apportion by measure; measure or deal (out); dole.
  • To be a measure of; serve for determining or expressing the extent, quantity, or capacity of.
  • To take measure or line; aim.
  • n. Measure.
  • n. Computation; estimate; measure.
  • n. Limitation; limit: in the phrase metes and bounds (rarely in the singular mete and bound).
  • To dream: often used impersonally: as, me mette, I dreamed.
  • Hence To lose the use of one's senses; be out of one's mind.
  • To dream.
  • To paint.
  • An obsolete form of meet.
  • An obsolete form of meet.
  • n. An abbreviation of Metallurgical Engineer.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a line that indicates a boundary

Etymologies

Middle English meten, from Old English metan.
Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin mēta, turning post, boundary.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English, from Old French mete ("boundary, boundary marker"), from Latin mēta ("post, goal, marker"), from Proto-Indo-European *meit- (“stake, post”). Cognate with Old English wullmod ("distaff"). (Wiktionary)
From Middle English meten, from Old English metan ("to measure, mete out, mark off, compare, estimate; pass over, traverse"), from Proto-Germanic *metanan (“to measure”), from Proto-Indo-European *med- (“to measure, consider”). Cognate with Scots mete ("to measure"), West Frisian mjitte ("to measure"), Dutch meten ("to measure"), German messen ("to measure"), Swedish mäta ("to measure"), Latin modus ("limit, measure, target"), Ancient Greek μεδίμνος (medímnos, "measure, bushel"), Ancient Greek μέδεσθαι (médesthai, "care for"), Old Armenian միտ (mit, "mind"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • "To dream: often used impersonally: as, me mette, I dreamed.

    Hence To lose the use of one's senses; be out of one's mind."

    --CD&C

    May 12, 2012

  • No, I'm pretty sure it counts as an amber word.

    March 28, 2011

  • Is there a present context in which 'mete' is used without 'out', as in mete out?

    March 28, 2011

  • Mete(n): v., dream
    Middle English, now obs.
    Cf sweven, dream

    March 30, 2007