Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A standard dimension, quantity, or capacity, as.
  • noun The distance between the two rails of a railroad.
  • noun The distance between two wheels on an axle.
  • noun The interior diameter of a shotgun barrel as determined by the number of lead balls of a size exactly fitting the barrel that are required to make one pound. Often used in combination.
  • noun The thickness or diameter of sheet metal, wire, or a similar manufactured material or piece.
  • noun The fineness of knitted cloth as measured by the number of stitches per a given unit of length.
  • noun A standard or scale of measurement.
  • noun An instrument for measuring the dimensions, capacity, or amount of something.
  • noun A means of estimating or evaluating; a test.
  • noun Nautical The position of a vessel in relation to another vessel and the wind.
  • transitive verb To measure the dimensions, capacity, proportions, or amount of (something), especially by means of a gauge.
  • transitive verb To evaluate or estimate.
  • transitive verb To adapt or make conform to a specified standard.
  • transitive verb To chip or rub (bricks or stones) to size.
  • adjective Of or relating to a gauge.
  • adjective Physics Invariant under a local transformation.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun etc. See gage, etc.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To measure or determine with a gauge.
  • transitive verb To measure or to ascertain the contents or the capacity of, as of a pipe, barrel, or keg.
  • transitive verb (Mech.) To measure the dimensions of, or to test the accuracy of the form of, as of a part of a gunlock.
  • transitive verb To draw into equidistant gathers by running a thread through it, as cloth or a garment.
  • transitive verb To measure the capacity, character, or ability of; to estimate; to judge of.
  • noun A measure; a standard of measure; an instrument to determine dimensions, distance, or capacity; a standard.
  • noun Measure; dimensions; estimate.
  • noun (Mach. & Manuf.) Any instrument for ascertaining or regulating the dimensions or forms of things; a templet or template.
  • noun (Physics) Any instrument or apparatus for measuring the state of a phenomenon, or for ascertaining its numerical elements at any moment; -- usually applied to some particular instrument
  • noun Relative positions of two or more vessels with reference to the wind.
  • noun The depth to which a vessel sinks in the water.
  • noun The distance between the rails of a railway.
  • noun (Plastering) The quantity of plaster of Paris used with common plaster to accelerate its setting.
  • noun (Building) That part of a shingle, slate, or tile, which is exposed to the weather, when laid; also, one course of such shingles, slates, or tiles.
  • noun etc., the distance between the wheels; -- ordinarily called the track.
  • noun a stop cock used as a try cock for ascertaining the height of the water level in a steam boiler.
  • noun (Railroads) the jar caused by a car-wheel flange striking the edge of the rail.
  • noun a glass tube for a water gauge.
  • noun an automatic lathe for turning a round object having an irregular profile, as a baluster or chair round, to a templet or gauge.
  • noun the diameter of a cylinder whose altitude is one inch, and contents equal to that of a unit of a given measure; -- a term used in gauging casks, etc.
  • noun a graduated rod, for measuring the capacity of barrels, casks, etc.
  • noun a handsaw, with a gauge to regulate the depth of cut.
  • noun a stiff and compact plaster, used in making cornices, moldings, etc., by means of a templet.
  • noun a wheel at the forward end of a plow beam, to determine the depth of the furrow.
  • noun an instrument used to strike a line parallel to the straight side of a board, etc.
  • noun an instrument to regulate the length of the page.
  • noun an instrument for measuring the quantity of rain at any given place.
  • noun an instrument or contrivance for indicating the degree of saltness of water from its specific gravity, as in the boilers of ocean steamers.
  • noun an instrument for finding the depth of the sea.
  • noun a glass siphon tube, partly filled with mercury, -- used to indicate pressure, as of steam, or the degree of rarefaction produced in the receiver of an air pump or other vacuum; a manometer.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old North French, gauging rod, of Germanic origin.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English gage, gaugen, from Anglo-Norman, Old Northern French gauger (compare Modern French jauger from Old French jaugier), from gauge ("gauging rod"), from Frankish *galga ("measuring rod, pole"), from Proto-Germanic *galgô (“pole, stake, cross”), from Proto-Indo-European *g'hAlgh-, *g'hAlg- (“perch, long switch”). Cognate with Old High German galgo, Old Frisian galga, Old English ġealga ("cross-beam, gallows"), Old Norse galgi ("cross-beam, gallows"), Old Norse gelgja ("pole, perch").

Examples

  • I have been working on similar physics with what I call gauge-holes (which is what I call these) in Anti-deSitter spacetimes.

    A Dark, Misleading Force

  • The 20 gauge is no slouch, but only a starter gun for waterfowl if you can't handle a 12 gauge just yet.

    Remington 870

  • No quality, properly choked, 3 pump 12 gauge is ever a bad choice for a waterfowling.

    A Proper Waterfowl Gun

  • I agree that a 20 gauge is fine all-around shotgun!

    Is a 20 guage remington 870 pumpa good all around shotgun.

  • No quality, properly choked, 3 pump 12 gauge is ever a bad choice for a waterfowling.

    A Proper Waterfowl Gun

  • In my opinion the 870 in 12 gauge is the only gun a would need unless he was an elk hunter but you get the picture .. these guns last forever and i mean a LONG time so make sure you make a decision on your size and what you can handle ... happy hunting and good luck choosing the right 870 +1

    Remington 870

  • The 20 gauge is no slouch, but only a starter gun for waterfowl if you can't handle a 12 gauge just yet.

    Remington 870

  • If you go to the hardware store to get two lengths of a certain gauge wire, one 2 feet long and one 6 feet long, and then back home you discover you need different lengths for your project, it is just as hard to cut through the 2-foot length in some mid-point as it is to cut the 6-foot length at some mid-point.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Why Recalls of U.S. Senators Are Unconstitutional

  • In my opinion the 870 in 12 gauge is the only gun a would need unless he was an elk hunter but you get the picture .. these guns last forever and i mean a LONG time so make sure you make a decision on your size and what you can handle ... happy hunting and good luck choosing the right 870 +1

    Remington 870

  • Remington 870's have their own reputation. 20 gauge is my first choice.

    Is a 20 guage remington 870 pumpa good all around shotgun.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • I always have to strain against personal feelings to spell this word correctly. Gauge looks like gouge sounds, and deep inside, I've always wished it were guage, which feels truer to sound and reminds me of things like suede.

    July 11, 2008

  • "My boyfriend has just proposed to me. Now we are engauged."

    March 3, 2009

  • At least they'll be uniform about it.

    March 3, 2009

  • HA HA HA!! Better than engouged, I guess...

    March 3, 2009