Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A chisel with a rounded, troughlike blade.
  • n. A scooping or digging action, as with such a chisel.
  • n. A groove or hole scooped with or as if with such a chisel.
  • n. Informal A large amount, as of money, exacted or extorted.
  • transitive v. To cut or scoop out with or as if with a gouge: "He began to gouge a small pattern in the sand with his cane” ( Vladimir Nabokov).
  • transitive v. To force out the eye of (a person) with one's thumb.
  • transitive v. To thrust one's thumb into the eye of.
  • transitive v. Informal To extort from.
  • transitive v. Slang To swindle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A cut or groove, as left by something sharp.
  • n. A chisel, with a curved blade, for scooping or cutting holes, channels, or grooves, in wood, stone, etc.
  • n. A bookbinder's tool with a curved face, used for blind tooling or gilding.
  • n. An incising tool that cuts forms or blanks for gloves, envelopes, etc.. from leather, paper, etc.
  • n. Soft material lying between the wall of a vein and the solid vein.
  • n. imposition; cheat; fraud
  • n. An impostor; a cheat.
  • v. To make a mark or hole by scooping.
  • v. To push, or try to push the eye (of a person) out of its socket.
  • v. To charge an unreasonably or unfairly high price.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A chisel, with a hollow or semicylindrical blade, for scooping or cutting holes, channels, or grooves, in wood, stone, etc.; a similar instrument, with curved edge, for turning wood.
  • n. A bookbinder's tool for blind tooling or gilding, having a face which forms a curve.
  • n. An incising tool which cuts forms or blanks for gloves, envelopes, etc. from leather, paper, etc.
  • n. Soft material lying between the wall of a vein and the solid vein.
  • n. The act of scooping out with a gouge, or as with a gouge; a groove or cavity scooped out, as with a gouge.
  • n. Imposition; cheat; fraud; also, an impostor; a cheat; a trickish person.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To scoop out or turn with a gouge.
  • Hence To scoop or excavate as if with a gouge; dig or tear out by or as if by a scooping action: as, to gouge a loaf of bread; to gouge a hole in a garment.
  • To cheat in a bold or brutal manner; overreach in a bargain.
  • n. A chisel with a longitudinally curved blade, used to cut holes, channels, or grooves in wood or stone, or for turning wood in a lathe.
  • n. In bookbinding, a gilders' tool intended to make the segment of a circle.
  • n. A local name for a shell which gouges or cuts the foot when trodden on; specifically, in the Gulf of Mexico, a shell of the genus Pinna or Vermetus.
  • n. A stamp for cutting leather or paper.
  • n. In mining, the band or layer of decomposed country rock or clayey material (flucan) often found on each side of a lode.
  • n. An effect of gouging; an excavation or a hole made by or as if by scooping out matter.
  • n. An imposition; a cheat; also, an impostor.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. make a groove in
  • n. the act of gouging
  • n. an impression in a surface (as made by a blow)
  • n. and edge tool with a blade like a trough for cutting channels or grooves
  • v. force with the thumb
  • v. obtain by coercion or intimidation

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin gubia, variant of gulbia, of Celtic origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Noun from Old French gouge, itself from Late Latin gulbia ("piercer"), from Gaulish (compare Scottish Gaelic gilb ("chisel"), Welsh gylyf ("sickle")), from *gulbi ("beak") (compare Old Irish gulba, Welsh gylf, Old Breton golb). (Wiktionary)

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