Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To set (the first line of a paragraph, for example) in from the margin.
  • transitive v. To cut or tear (a document with two or more copies) along an irregular line so that the parts can later be matched for establishing authenticity.
  • transitive v. To draw up (a document) in duplicate or triplicate.
  • transitive v. To notch or serrate the edge of; make jagged.
  • transitive v. To make notches, grooves, or holes in (wood, for example) for the purpose of mortising.
  • transitive v. To fit or join together by or as if by mortising.
  • transitive v. Chiefly British To order (goods) by purchase order or official requisition.
  • intransitive v. To make or form an indentation.
  • intransitive v. Chiefly British To draw up or order an indent.
  • n. The act of indenting or the condition of being indented.
  • n. A blank space before the beginning of an indented line: a two-pica indent.
  • n. An indenture.
  • n. A U.S. certificate issued at the close of the American Revolution for interest due on the public debt.
  • n. Chiefly British An official requisition or purchase order for goods.
  • transitive v. To impress (a design, for example); stamp.
  • n. An indentation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A cut or notch in the margin of anything, or a recess like a notch.
  • n. A stamp; an impression.
  • n. A certificate, or intended certificate, issued by the government of the United States at the close of the Revolution, for the principal or interest of the public debt.
  • n. A requisition or order for supplies, sent to the commissariat of an army.
  • v. To notch; to jag; to cut into points like a row of teeth; as, to indent the edge of paper.
  • v. To be cut, notched, or dented.
  • v. To dent; to stamp or to press in; to impress; as, indent a smooth surface with a hammer; to indent wax with a stamp.
  • v. To cut the two halves of a document in duplicate, using a jagged or wavy line so that each party could demonstrate that their copy was part of the original whole.
  • v. To enter into a binding agreement by means of such documents; to formally commit (to doing something).
  • v. To engage (someone), originally by means of indented contracts.
  • v. To begin (a line or lines) at a greater or less distance from the margin; as, to indent the first line of a paragraph one em; to indent the second paragraph two ems more than the first. See indentation, and indention. Normal indent pushes in a line or paragraph. "hanging indent" pulls the line out into the margin.
  • v. To crook or turn; to wind in and out; to zigzag.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A cut or notch in the margin of anything, or a recess like a notch.
  • n. A stamp; an impression.
  • n. A certificate, or intended certificate, issued by the government of the United States at the close of the Revolution, for the principal or interest of the public debt.
  • n. A requisition or order for supplies, sent to the commissariat of an army.
  • intransitive v. To be cut, notched, or dented.
  • intransitive v. To crook or turn; to wind in and out; to zigzag.
  • intransitive v. To contract; to bargain or covenant.
  • transitive v. To notch; to jag; to cut into points like a row of teeth.
  • transitive v. To dent; to stamp or to press in; to impress
  • transitive v. To bind out by indenture or contract; to indenture; to apprentice
  • transitive v. To begin (a line or lines) at a greater or less distance from the margin
  • transitive v. To make an order upon; to draw upon, as for military stores.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To make a dent or depression in, as by a blow or by pressure; dent or dint.
  • To dent or press in; form as a dent or depression.
  • To make notches in resembling teeth; cut into points or jags like a row of teeth; notch; jag; serrate.
  • Specifically Formerly, to notch the edges of (two copies of a writing, as a deed, covenant, articles of agreement, etc., in which two parties had an interest), as a conventional means of identification and security.
  • Hence To covenant or bargain for; transfer by covenant; indenture.
  • In type-setting and writing, to throw or sink inward by a blank space in the margin, as the first line of a paragraph; hence, to begin, or exceptionally to begin and end, with a fixed amount of blank space, whether evenly or unevenly, as lines of poetry or of type specially arranged. See indention.
  • To move in a zigzag course; wind in and out; double in moving.
  • To contract; bargain; make a compact.
  • n. A cut or notch in the margin, or a recess like a notch; an indentation.
  • n. A writing, as a deed, covenant, contract, order for goods, articles of agreement, etc., having the edges indented (see indent, transitive verb, 2, 3); hence, any covenant.
  • n. An indented certificate issued by the United States government at the close of the Revolution, for the principal or interest due on the public debt.
  • n. A requisition for military stores.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. make a depression into
  • n. an order for goods to be exported or imported
  • v. notch the edge of or make jagged
  • v. set in from the margin
  • v. cut or tear along an irregular line so that the parts can later be matched for authentication
  • n. the space left between the margin and the start of an indented line
  • v. bind by or as if by indentures, as of an apprentice or servant

Etymologies

Middle English endenten, to notch, from Anglo-Norman and Old French endenter, both from Medieval Latin indentāre : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin dēns, dent-, tooth; see dent- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

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