Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To put an abrupt end to: The prime minister scotched the rumors of her illness with a public appearance.
  • transitive v. To injure so as to render harmless.
  • transitive v. To cut or score.
  • n. A surface cut or abrasion.
  • n. A line drawn on the ground, as one used in playing hopscotch.
  • transitive v. To block (a wheel, for example) with a prop to prevent rolling or slipping.
  • n. A block or wedge used as a prop behind or under an object likely to roll.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of Scottish origin.
  • n. A surface cut or abrasion.
  • n. A line drawn on the ground, as one used in playing hopscotch.
  • n. A block for a wheel or other round object.
  • n. Whisky of Scottish origin.
  • v. To cut or score.
  • v. To prevent (something) from being successful.
  • v. To debunk or discredit an idea or rumor.
  • v. To block a wheel or other round object.
  • v. To beat yarn in order to break up slugs and align the threads.
  • v. to rape
  • v. To dress (stone) with a pick or pointed instrument.
  • v. To clothe or cover up.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to Scotland, its language, or its inhabitants; Scottish.
  • n. The dialect or dialects of English spoken by the people of Scotland.
  • n. Collectively, the people of Scotland.
  • n. A chock, wedge, prop, or other support, to prevent slipping.
  • n. A slight cut or incision; a score.
  • transitive v. To shoulder up; to prop or block with a wedge, chock, etc., as a wheel, to prevent its rolling or slipping.
  • transitive v. To cut superficially; to wound; to score.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Same as Scottish.
  • n. Collectively, the people of Scotland. Also Scots, as plural of Scot.
  • n. The dialect or dialects of English spoken by the people of Scotland. Also Scots.
  • n. Scotch whisky.
  • To scratch; score or mark with slight incisions; notch; hack. See scotching.
  • To wound slightly.
  • To dock; fine; amerce.
  • To prop or block, as the wheel of a coach or wagon, with a stone or other obstacle; hence, to put on the brake or drag to.
  • To hold back.
  • n. A slight cut or shallow incision; a scratch; a notch.
  • n. A line drawn on the ground, as in hop-scotch.
  • n. A prop or strut placed behind or before a wheel, to prevent its moving, or placed under a log to prevent it from rolling.
  • n. In well-boring, a slotted bar used to hold up the rod and tools while a section is being attached or detached from above.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. hinder or prevent (the efforts, plans, or desires) of
  • v. make a small cut or score into
  • n. whiskey distilled in Scotland; especially whiskey made from malted barley in a pot still
  • adj. avoiding waste
  • n. a slight surface cut (especially a notch that is made to keep a tally)
  • adj. of or relating to or characteristic of Scotland or its people or culture or its English dialect or Gaelic language

Etymologies

Middle English scocchen, to cut, perhaps from Anglo-Norman escocher, to notch : es-, intensive pref. (from Latin ex-; see ex-) + Old French coche, notch (probably from Latin coccum, scarlet oak berry, from Greek kokkos).
Origin unknown.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English scocchen ("to cut"), perhaps from Anglo-Norman escocher ("to notch") , from es- ("intensive prefix"), from Latin ex- + Old French coche ("notch") (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • Scotch was used as a Verb by Gore Vidal in his novel, Duluth, as, "...scotch the rumor." If memory serves, the author used the word to mean a quashing of the rumor; using the word to mean not a tallying of, but a scratching away at, for purposes of elimination or removal. See: to scotch a rumor.

    October 21, 2009

  • Most Scottish people would object to

    of or relating to or characteristic of Scotland or its people or culture or its English dialect or Gaelic language

    we're Scottish or Scots. Scotch nowadays would only really be used to refer to the drink, or eggs, or mist...well certainly not the people.

    January 18, 2009

  • As a half-Scot: Wow.

    September 28, 2008

  • "But with conservative Republicans denouncing the plan as an affront to free market capitalism and some liberal Democrats criticizing it as a giveaway to Wall Street, both parties were anxiously starting to court votes, particularly in the House, where angry Republicans nearly scotched a deal that had been in the works for days."

    The New York Times, Consensus on Rescue Plan Is Said to Be Near, by David M. Herszenhorn and Carl Hulse, September 27, 2008

    September 28, 2008

  • Distinct from Scots, this 15th century word means to scratch, cut or score on the ground which is how hopscotch was played before kids got their hands on chalk. Butterscotch is similarly named for its scoring or cutting into squares. See scot-free and to scotch a rumor. --from the OED

    May 1, 2007