Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A thin, cushionlike mass of soft material used to fill, to give shape, or to protect against jarring, scraping, or other injury.
  • n. A flexible saddle without a frame.
  • n. An ink-soaked cushion used to ink a rubber stamp.
  • n. A number of sheets of paper of the same size stacked one on top of the other and glued together at one end; a tablet.
  • n. The broad floating leaf of an aquatic plant such as the water lily.
  • n. The flattened fleshy stem of a cactus such as certain varieties of prickly pear. Also called paddle1.
  • n. The cushionlike flesh on the underpart of the toes and feet of many animals.
  • n. The foot of such an animal.
  • n. The fleshy underside of the end of a finger or toe.
  • n. A launch pad.
  • n. A helipad.
  • n. A keypad.
  • n. Slang One's apartment or room.
  • transitive v. To line or stuff with soft material.
  • transitive v. To lengthen or increase, especially with extraneous or false information: pad a lecture with jokes; pad an expense account.
  • idiom on the pad Slang Taking bribes.
  • intransitive v. To go about on foot.
  • intransitive v. To move or walk about almost inaudibly.
  • transitive v. To go along (a route) on foot: padding the long road into town.
  • n. A muffled sound resembling that of soft footsteps.
  • n. A horse with a plodding gait.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A flattened mass of anything soft, to sit or lie on.
  • n. A cushion used as a saddle without a tree or frame.
  • n. A soft, or small, cushion.
  • n. A cushion-like thickening of the skin on the under side of the toes of animals.
  • n. An animal's foot or paw.
  • n. Any cushion-like part of the human body, especially the ends of the fingers.
  • n. A stuffed guard or protection, especially one worn on the legs of horses to prevent bruising.
  • n. A soft bag or cushion to relieve pressure, support a part, etc.
  • n. A sanitary napkin.
  • n. A floating leaf of a water lily or similar plant.
  • n. a batsman's leg pad that protects it from damage when hit by the ball
  • n. A kind of cushion for writing upon, or for blotting, especially one formed of many flat sheets of writing paper; now especially such a block of paper sheets as used to write on.
  • n. A panel or strip of material designed to be sensitive to pressure or touch.
  • n. A keypad.
  • n. A flat surface or area from which a helicopter or other aircraft may land or be launched.
  • n. An electrical extension cord with a multi-port socket one end: "trip cord"
  • n. The effect produced by sustained lower reed notes in a musical piece, most common in blues music.
  • n. A synthesizer instrument sound used for sustained background sounds.
  • n. A bed.
  • n. A place of residence.
  • n. A random key (originally written on a disposable pad) of the same length as the plaintext.
  • n. A mousepad.
  • v. To stuff.
  • v. To furnish with a pad or padding.
  • v. To fill or lengthen (a story, one's importance, etc.).
  • v. To imbue uniformly with a mordant.
  • v. to deliberately play the ball with the leg pad instead of the bat.
  • n. A toad.
  • n. A footpath, particularly one unformed or umaintained; a road or track. See footpad.
  • n. An easy-paced horse; a padnag.
  • n. A robber that infests the road on foot; a highwayman or footpad.
  • n. A type of wickerwork basket, especially as used as a measure of fish or other goods.
  • interj. Indicating a soft flat sound, as of bare footsteps.
  • n. The sound of soft footsteps, or a similar noise made by an animal etc.
  • v. To travel along (a road, path etc.).
  • v. To travel on foot.
  • v. To wear a path by walking.
  • v. To walk softly, quietly or steadily, especially without shoes.
  • v. To practise highway robbery.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A footpath; a road.
  • n. An easy-paced horse; a padnag.
  • n. A robber that infests the road on foot; a highwayman; -- usually called a footpad.
  • n. The act of robbing on the highway.
  • n. A soft, or small, cushion; a mass of anything soft; stuffing.
  • n. A kind of cushion for writing upon, or for blotting; esp., one formed of many flat sheets of writing paper, or layers of blotting paper; a block of paper.
  • n. A cushion used as a saddle without a tree or frame.
  • n. A stuffed guard or protection; esp., one worn on the legs of horses to prevent bruising.
  • n. A cushionlike thickening of the skin one the under side of the toes of animals.
  • n. A floating leaf of a water lily or similar plant.
  • n. A soft bag or cushion to relieve pressure, support a part, etc.
  • n. A piece of timber fixed on a beam to fit the curve of the deck.
  • n. A measure for fish; ; a basket of soles.
  • n. A dwelling place, usually an apartment; one's living quarters.
  • n. A sum of money paid as a bribe to police officers, shared among them
  • intransitive v. To travel heavily or slowly.
  • intransitive v. To rob on foot.
  • intransitive v. To wear a path by walking.
  • transitive v. To travel upon foot; to tread.
  • transitive v. To stuff; to furnish with a pad or padding.
  • transitive v. To imbue uniformly with a mordant.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To travel on foot; tramp slowly or wearily along; trudge or jog along.
  • To travel on foot over or along; proceed on foot through; journey slowly, steadily, or wearily along.
  • To tread or beat down; make smooth and level by treading: as, to pad a path.
  • To stuff or furnish with a pad or padding: often with out.
  • To expand by the insertion of extraneous or needless matter, or the use of unnecessary words: as, to pad an article in a newspaper; to pad out a page in a book.
  • In calico-printing, to impregnate (the cotton cloth to be printed) with a mordant. It is done in a machine called a padding-machine (which see).
  • To glue the edges of (sheets of paper) together, so as to form a pad.
  • In mech., to puncture with numerous fine holes, as the end of a pipe, or the rose on the end of a nozle.
  • To be a footpad, or highway robber; frequent roads or highways in order to rob.
  • To move with the soft thud of a bare foot striking the ground.
  • In leather-making, to apply a heavy coating of solution to.
  • In India, to pack on an elephant's pad.
  • n. A path; a footpath; a road.
  • n. A toad; a frog.
  • n. A soft cushion, or something of the nature of a cushion, or a stuffed part, as of a garment, a saddle, etc., used to fill up a hollow, to relieve pressure, or as a protection.
  • n. Specifically— In cricket, a wadded guard worn to protect the leg by a batsman or wicket-keeper.
  • n. In embroidery, a small qnantity of fibrous material, such as raw cotton or silk, used for raising parts of a pattern, the stitch covering it closely.
  • n. One of the large, fleshy, thick-skinned protuberances of the sole of the foot of various quadrupeds, as the dog or fox; hence, specifically, the foot of a fox.
  • n. One of the tylari of a bird's foot; one of the cushion-like enlargements on the under side of a bird's toes. Compare heel-pad and pterna.
  • n. In anatomy, the splenium of the corpus callosum. See splenium.
  • n. In entomology, a projecting part of the body covered only with a membrane or semi-chitinous sheath: generally used in composition: as, the wing-pads of a pupa; the foot-pads or cushions on the tarsi.
  • n. A cushion used as a saddle; a saddle of leather and padding, without any tree, such as are used by country market-women or by equestrian performers in a circus.
  • n. A number of sheets of writing-, drawing-, or blotting-paper held together by glue at one or more edges, forming a tablet from which the sheets can be removed singly as used: as, a writing-pad; a blotting-pad.
  • n. A bundle; bale; pack: as, a pad of wool; a pad of yarn. Among fish-dealers a pad of mackerel is 60 (sometimes 120) fish.
  • n. The handle of some tools: as, the pad of a keyhole-saw.
  • n. In ship-building, a piece laid over a ship's beam to give the camber.
  • n. plural Thick ribbons, double-faced and watered, much in use at certain times for watch-guards. Compare Petersham ribbon, under ribbon.
  • n. A pannier; a basket.
  • n. A road-horse; a horse for riding on the road, as distinguished from a hunter or a work-horse, etc.; a roadster.
  • n. A robber; a footpad.
  • n. [pad, verb] A dull sound, as of footsteps.
  • n. A large floating disk-like leaf-blade, chiefly that of the water-lilies: used mostly in the combination lily-pad; so called from its suggesting a cushion. Also pad-leaf.
  • n. Specifically, the pile of tobacco-leaf segments formed by booking, that is, laying smoothly one above another for use in cigar-making.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a block of absorbent material saturated with ink; used to transfer ink evenly to a rubber stamp
  • n. a platform from which rockets or space craft are launched
  • n. temporary living quarters
  • v. add padding to
  • n. the fleshy cushion-like underside of an animal's foot or of a human's finger
  • v. line or stuff with soft material
  • n. a number of sheets of paper fastened together along one edge
  • n. a flat mass of soft material used for protection, stuffing, or comfort
  • n. the large floating leaf of an aquatic plant (as the water lily)
  • v. add details to
  • v. walk heavily and firmly, as when weary, or through mud

Etymologies

Origin unknown.
Perhaps from Middle Dutch paden, tread a path, from pad, pat, path; see pent- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
1554, "bundle of straw to lie on", possibly, from Middle Low German or Dutch pad ("sole of the foot"). (Wiktionary)
Precise etymology unknown; probably existed (though unattested) in Old English. Possibly cognate with Dutch pad, dialectal German Padde, Swedish padda, Danish padde, and possibly ancestor to the pad-like English paddle. (Wiktionary)
From Dutch pad or Middle Low German pat ("path"). (Wiktionary)
Perhaps an alteration of ped. (Wiktionary)
Probably partly from Middle Low German, partly imitative. (Wiktionary)
Probably imitative, perhaps related to or influenced by Etymology 5, above. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • "pad" in Hungarian means: bench / desk

    August 1, 2012

  • "21. In calico-printing, to impregnate (the cotton cloth to be printed) with a mordant. It is done in a machine called a padding-machine (which see)."

    --Century Dictionary

    September 16, 2010

  • Cricket jargon - a protective guard worn on the leg. Batsmen in modern times also use thigh-pads and chest-pads as protection.

    November 30, 2007