Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To impose a duty, responsibility, or obligation on: charged him with the task of watching the young swimmers.
  • transitive v. To set or ask (a given amount) as a price: charges ten dollars for a haircut.
  • transitive v. To hold financially liable; demand payment from: charged her for the balance due.
  • transitive v. To postpone payment on (a purchase) by recording as a debt: paid cash for the stockings but charged the new coat.
  • transitive v. To load to capacity; fill: charge a furnace with coal.
  • transitive v. To saturate; impregnate: The atmosphere was charged with tension.
  • transitive v. To load (a gun or other firearm) with a quantity of explosive: charged the musket with powder.
  • transitive v. To instruct or urge authoritatively; command: charged her not to reveal the source of information.
  • transitive v. Law To instruct (a jury) about the law, its application, and the weighing of evidence.
  • transitive v. To make a claim of wrongdoing against; accuse or blame: The police charged him with car theft. Critics charged the writer with a lack of originality.
  • transitive v. To put the blame for; attribute or impute: charged the accident to the driver's inexperience.
  • transitive v. To attack violently: The troops charged the enemy line.
  • transitive v. Basketball To bump or run into (a defender) illegally while in possession of the ball or having just made a pass or shot.
  • transitive v. Sports To bump (an opponent) so as to knock off balance or gain control of the ball, as in soccer.
  • transitive v. Sports To body-check (an opponent) illegally, from behind or after taking more than two strides, as in ice hockey.
  • transitive v. Electricity To cause formation of a net electric charge on or in (a conductor, for example).
  • transitive v. Electricity To energize (a storage battery) by passing current through it in the direction opposite to discharge.
  • transitive v. To excite; rouse: a speaker who knows how to charge up a crowd.
  • transitive v. To direct or put (a weapon) into position for use; level.
  • transitive v. Heraldry To place a charge on (an escutcheon).
  • intransitive v. To rush forward in or as if in a violent attack: dogs trained to charge at intruders; children charging through the house.
  • intransitive v. To demand or ask payment: did not charge for the second cup of coffee.
  • intransitive v. To postpone payment for a purchase.
  • intransitive v. Accounting To consider or record as a loss. Often used with off.
  • n. Expense; cost.
  • n. The price asked for something: no charge for window-shopping.
  • n. A weight or burden; a load: a freighter relieved of its charge of cargo.
  • n. The quantity that a container or apparatus can hold.
  • n. A quantity of explosive to be set off at one time.
  • n. An assigned duty or task; a responsibility: The commission's charge was to determine the facts.
  • n. One that is entrusted to another's care or management: the baby sitter's three young charges.
  • n. Supervision; management: the scientist who had overall charge of the research project.
  • n. Care; custody: a child put in my charge.
  • n. An order, command, or injunction.
  • n. Law Instruction given by a judge to a jury about the law, its application, and the weighing of evidence.
  • n. A claim of wrongdoing; an accusation: a charge of murder; pleaded not guilty to the charges.
  • n. A rushing, forceful attack: repelled the charge of enemy troops; the charge of a herd of elephants.
  • n. The command to attack: The bugler sounded the charge.
  • n. A debt or an entry in an account recording a debt: Are you paying cash or is this a charge?
  • n. A financial burden, such as a tax or lien.
  • n. Physics The intrinsic property of matter responsible for all electric phenomena, in particular for the force of the electromagnetic interaction, occurring in two forms arbitrarily designated negative and positive.
  • n. Physics A measure of this property.
  • n. Physics The net measure of this property possessed by a body or contained in a bounded region of space.
  • n. Informal A feeling of pleasant excitement; a thrill: got a real charge out of the movie.
  • n. Heraldry Any figure or device represented on the field of an escutcheon.
  • idiom in charge In a position of leadership or supervision: the security agent in charge at the airport.
  • idiom in charge Chiefly British Under arrest.
  • idiom in charge of Having control over or responsibility for: You're in charge of making the salad.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The scope of someone's responsibility.
  • n. Someone or something entrusted to one's care, such as a child to a babysitter or a student to a teacher.
  • n. A load or burden; cargo.
  • n. The amount of money levied for a service.
  • n. An instruction.
  • n. A ground attack against a prepared enemy.
  • n. An accusation.
  • n. An electric charge.
  • n. An offensive foul in which the player with the ball moves into a stationary defender.
  • n. A measured amount of powder and/or shot in a firearm cartridge.
  • n. An image displayed on an escutcheon.
  • n. A forceful forward movement.
  • v. To place a burden upon; to assign a duty or responsibility to.
  • v. To load equipment with material required for its use, as a firearm with powder, a fire hose with water, a chemical reactor with raw materials.
  • v. To move forward quickly and forcefully, particularly in combat and/or on horseback.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A load or burder laid upon a person or thing.
  • n. A person or thing commited or intrusted to the care, custody, or management of another; a trust.
  • n. Custody or care of any person, thing, or place; office; responsibility; oversight; obigation; duty.
  • n. Heed; care; anxiety; trouble.
  • n. Harm.
  • n. An order; a mandate or command; an injunction.
  • n. An address (esp. an earnest or impressive address) containing instruction or exhortation.
  • n. An accusation of a wrong of offense; allegation; indictment; specification of something alleged.
  • n. Whatever constitutes a burden on property, as rents, taxes, lines, etc.; costs; expense incurred; -- usually in the plural.
  • n. The price demanded for a thing or service.
  • n. An entry or a account of that which is due from one party to another; that which is debited in a business transaction.
  • n. That quantity, as of ammunition, electricity, ore, fuel, etc., which any apparatus, as a gun, battery, furnace, machine, etc., is intended to receive and fitted to hold, or which is actually in it at one time.
  • n. The act of rushing upon, or towards, an enemy; a sudden onset or attack, as of troops, esp. cavalry; hence, the signal for attack.
  • n. A position (of a weapon) fitted for attack.
  • n. A sort of plaster or ointment.
  • n. A bearing. See Bearing, n., 8.
  • n. Thirty-six pigs of lead, each pig weighing about seventy pounds; -- called also charre.
  • n. Weight; import; value.
  • intransitive v. To make an onset or rush.
  • intransitive v. To demand a price.
  • intransitive v. To debit on an account.
  • intransitive v. To squat on its belly and be still; -- a command given by a sportsman to a dog.
  • transitive v. To lay on or impose, as a load, tax, or burden; to load; to fill.
  • transitive v. To lay on or impose, as a task, duty, or trust; to command, instruct, or exhort with authority; to enjoin; to urge earnestly.
  • transitive v. To lay on, impose, or make subject to or liable for.
  • transitive v. To fix or demand as a price.
  • transitive v. To place something to the account of as a debt; to debit, . Also, to enter upon the debit side of an account.
  • transitive v. To impute or ascribe; to lay to one's charge.
  • transitive v. To accuse; to make a charge or assertion against (a person or thing); to lay the responsibility (for something said or done) at the door of.
  • transitive v. To place within or upon any firearm, piece of apparatus or machinery, the quantity it is intended and fitted to hold or bear; to load; to fill
  • transitive v. To ornament with or cause to bear.
  • transitive v. To assume as a bearing; ; to add to or represent on.
  • transitive v. To call to account; to challenge.
  • transitive v. To bear down upon; to rush upon; to attack.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To put a load or burden on or in; fill, cover, or occupy with something to be retained, supported, carried, etc.; burden; load: as, to charge a furnace, a gun, a Leyden jar, etc.; to charge an oven; to charge the mind with a principle or a message.
  • Figuratively, to fill or burden with some emotion.
  • To subject to a charge or financial burden.
  • To impute or register as a debt; place on the debit side of an account: as, the goods were charged to him.
  • To fix or ask as a price; require in exchange: as, to charge $5 a ton for coal. To fix or set down at a price named; sell at a given rate: as, to charge coal at $5 a ton.
  • To hold liable for payment; enter a debit against: as, A charged B for the goods.
  • To accuse: followed by with before the thing of which one is accused: as, to charge a man with theft.
  • To lay to one's charge; impute; ascribe the responsibility of: with a thing for the object, and on, upon, to, or against before the person or thing to which something is imputed: as, I charge the guilt of this on you; the accident must be charged to or against his own carelessness.
  • To intrust; commission: with with.
  • To command; enjoin; instruct; urge earnestly; exhort; adjure: with a person or thing as object.
  • To give directions to; instruct authoritatively: as, to charge a jury.
  • To call to account; challenge.
  • To bear down upon; make an onset on; fall on; attack by rushing violently against.
  • To put into the position of attack, as the spear in the rest.
  • To value; think much of; make account of.
  • To import; signify; be important.
  • To take to heart; be concerned or troubled.
  • To place the price of a thing to one's debit; ask payment; make a demand: as, I will not charge for this.
  • To make an onset; rush to an attack.
  • To lie down in obedience to a command: said of dogs: commonly used in the imperative.
  • Heavy; weighty.
  • To paint too heavily; to over-express.
  • n. A load; a weight; a burden: used either literally or figuratively.
  • n. The quantity of anything which an apparatus, as a gun, an electric battery, etc., is intended to receive and fitted to hold, or what it actually contains as a load.
  • n. Hence— The case or tube used to contain the charge of a gun; a cartridge-case.
  • n. In England, a quantity of lead of somewhat uncertain amount, but supposed to be 36 pigs, each pig containing 6 stone of 12 pounds each.
  • n. A unit of weight used in Brabant up to 1820, being 400 Brabant pounds, equal to 414 pounds avoirdupois.
  • n. A corn-measure used in southern France.
  • n. A pecuniary burden, encumbrance, tax, or lien; cost; expense.
  • n. That which constitutes debt in commercial transactions; the sum payable as the price of anything bought or any service rendered; an entry; the debit side of an account.
  • n. A duty enjoined upon or intrusted to one; care; custody; oversight.
  • n. Anything committed to another's custody, care, concern, or management; hence, specifically, a parish or congregation committed to the spiritual care of a pastor: as, he removed to a new charge.
  • n. Heed; attention.
  • n. A matter of importance, or for consideration; importance; value.
  • n. An order; an injunction; a mandate; a command.
  • n. An address delivered by a bishop to the clergy of his diocese, or in ordination services by a clergyman to the candidate receiving ordination, or to the congregation or church receiving him as pastor; also, any similar address delivered for the purpose of giving special instructions or advice.
  • n. An address delivered by a judge to a jury at the close of a trial, instructing them as to the legal points, the weight of evidence, etc., affecting their verdict in the case: as, the judge's charge bore hard upon the prisoner.
  • n. In Scots law: The command of the sovereign's letters to perform some act, as to enter an heir. The messenger's copy of service requiring the person to obey the order of the letters, or generally to implement the decree of a court: as, a charge on letters of horning, or a charge against a superior.
  • n. What is alleged or brought forward by way of accusation; imputation; accusation.
  • n. Milit., an impetuous attack upon the enemy, made with the view of fighting him at close quarters and routing him by the onset.
  • n. An order or a signal to make such an attack: as, the trumpeters sounded the charge.
  • n. The position of a weapon held in readiness for attack or encounter.
  • n. In heraldry, a bearing, or any figure borne or represented on an escutcheon, whether on the field or on an ordinary.
  • n. Of dogs: The act of lying down
  • n. The word of command given to a dog to lie down.
  • n. In farriery, a preparation of the consistence of a thick decoction, or between an ointment and a plaster, used as a remedy for sprains and inflammations.
  • n. In ordnance, the powder contained in a bag or case in quantity suitable for loading a gun, or the powder filling the interior of a projectile.
  • n. Short for chargé d'affaires.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a quantity of explosive to be set off at one time
  • v. fill or load to capacity
  • v. blame for, make a claim of wrongdoing or misbehavior against
  • v. lie down on command, of hunting dogs
  • v. cause to be agitated, excited, or roused
  • v. place a heraldic bearing on
  • n. attention and management implying responsibility for safety
  • n. a special assignment that is given to a person or group
  • n. heraldry consisting of a design or image depicted on a shield
  • v. move quickly and violently
  • n. the swift release of a store of affective force
  • v. attribute responsibility to
  • v. instruct (a jury) about the law, its application, and the weighing of evidence
  • n. an impetuous rush toward someone or something
  • n. request for payment of a debt
  • n. (criminal law) a pleading describing some wrong or offense
  • v. pay with a credit card; pay with plastic money; postpone payment by recording a purchase as a debt
  • n. an assertion that someone is guilty of a fault or offence
  • v. demand payment
  • n. the price charged for some article or service
  • v. instruct or command with authority
  • v. cause formation of a net electrical charge in or on
  • v. energize a battery by passing a current through it in the direction opposite to discharge
  • v. file a formal charge against
  • v. direct into a position for use
  • v. saturate
  • v. impose a task upon, assign a responsibility to
  • v. make an accusatory claim
  • v. to make a rush at or sudden attack upon, as in battle
  • v. cause to be admitted; of persons to an institution
  • v. set or ask for a certain price
  • v. provide (a device) with something necessary
  • n. the quantity of unbalanced electricity in a body (either positive or negative) and construed as an excess or deficiency of electrons
  • n. a person committed to your care
  • n. (psychoanalysis) the libidinal energy invested in some idea or person or object
  • n. financial liabilities (such as a tax)
  • v. enter a certain amount as a charge
  • v. assign a duty, responsibility or obligation to
  • n. a formal statement of a command or injunction to do something
  • v. give over to another for care or safekeeping

Etymologies

Middle English chargen, to load, from Old French chargier, from Late Latin carricāre, from Latin carrus, Gallic type of wagon, of Celtic origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English chargen, from Old French chargier, from Medieval Latin carricare ("to load"), from Latin carrus ("a car, wagon"); see car. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • (v.) filling a mooshine still or the thumper with beer or pumice.

    August 26, 2009

  • “If the Fliers are human,” Silk admonished his charges, “it would surely be evil to stone them. If they are not, you must consider that they may be higher than we are in the spiritual whorl, just as they are in the temporal.” —Gene Wolfe, The Book of the Long Sun

    July 29, 2009

  • A contranym: charge--add to and charge--take away (as a fee, from your non-plethorous, underachieving wallet).

    February 17, 2007

  • In heraldry, any device ‘charged’ or borne upon an escutcheon; a bearing.
    Usage: Chaucers armes are not so meane, eyther for coolour, chardge, or particione as some will make them. (1599)

    February 5, 2007