Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To accuse of a crime or other wrongful act.
  • transitive v. To cause to appear guilty of a crime or fault; implicate: testimony that incriminated the defendant.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To accuse or bring criminal charges against.
  • v. To indicate the guilt of.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To accuse; to charge with a crime or fault; to criminate.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To charge with a crime; accuse; criminate.
  • To make a subject of accusation; charge as a crime.
  • Synonyms Accuse, Charge, Indict, etc. See accuse.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. suggest that someone is guilty
  • v. bring an accusation against; level a charge against

Etymologies

Late Latin incrīmināre, incrīmināt- : Latin in-, causative pref.; see in-2 + Latin crīmen, crīmin-, crime; see crime.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Under Scottish law at present, suspects can be questioned by police for six hours without a lawyer, but yesterday the supreme court found that the measure made it more likely that suspects might "incriminate" themselves while being quizzed by officers.

    Scotland rushes through new laws after court ruling on questioning suspects

  • It prohibits the government from compelling anyone to "incriminate" himself.

    Alan Dershowitz: Why Roger Clemens, Even if Innocent, Should Take the 5th

  • Pay attention to the fact that the attorney-general's top aide took the Fifth Amendment, refusing to testify on grounds that her testimony might "incriminate" herself.

    A Matter of Convenience

  • One reason is that such perpetrators do not 'incriminate' themselves by setting up specific websites for their purposes, but often lurk in popular chatrooms used by the public, said a Media Development Authority (MDA) official.

    www.hardwarezone.com.sg

  • A ruling issued today found that the practice was aimed at making it more likely a suspect in Scotland might "incriminate" themselves under police questioning.

    The Independent - Frontpage RSS Feed

  • It is quite unfortunate that, due to present conditions, there is little I can tell you about my comrades-in-arms without the fear that I might "incriminate" them.

    NOLA Indymedia

  • [14] yet the dictionary doesn't yet recognize it exculpatory often used in the phrase "exculpatory evidence," it took nearly 50 years to develop this term after origination of the legal term suggesting guilt: "incriminate" falsifiability first emphasized by Karl Popper in 1934, this helps define science: if a proposition is false, then it can be shown to be false.

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • [13] yet the dictionary doesn't yet recognize it exculpatory often used in the phrase "exculpatory evidence," it took nearly 50 years to develop this term after origination of the legal term suggesting guilt: "incriminate" falsifiability first emphasized by Karl Popper in 1934, this helps define science: if a proposition is false, then it can be shown to be false.

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • | often used in the phrase "exculpatory evidence," it took nearly 50 years to develop this term after origination of the legal term suggesting guilt: "incriminate"

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • John Herbison: The right to remain silent to avoid self-incrimination is applicable to civil cases, but only to the extent that to answer would require the witness to incriminate himself, that is, to furnish a link in the chain of evidence needed to prosecute him for a crime.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Not the Best Way to Inspire Confidence

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