Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A small escutcheon within another

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A small escutcheon borne within a shield.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In heraldry, a small escutcheon, or the representation of a shield, used either as a bearing or charged upon the escutcheon for a special purpose, as an escutcheon of pretense, or very small and borne in chief by a baronet, in which case it is charged with the red hand of Ulster. When there are several inescutcheons, they are usually called escutcheons.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In the centre is an inescutcheon bearing the Union Jack honouring the role of the military college and its alumni in defending King, Country and Empire in the various wars.

    The Old Eighteen

  • Azure, an orle of martlets or, on an inescutcheon arg. three bass gules.

    Notes and Queries, Number 59, December 14, 1850

  • Alexander for the plantation on the security of the payments to be made by future baronets, and empowering them to offer a further inducement to applicants; and on the same day he granted to all Nova Scotia baronets the right to wear about their necks, suspended by an orange tawny ribbon, a badge bearing an azure saltire with a crowned inescutcheon of the arms of

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3 "Banks" to "Bassoon"

  • All baronets are entitled to display in their coat of arms, either on a canton or on an inescutcheon, the red hand of Ulster, save those of Nova

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3 "Banks" to "Bassoon"

  • Gu. an inescutcheon arg. between D escallop shells in saltine or.

    A History of Caroline County, Virginia

  • In the place where the breach was opened by his cannon he ordered the placing of a marble panel bearing his arms; and there it is to be seen to this day: Dexter, the sable bars of the House of Lenzol; Sinister, the Borgia bull in chief, and the lilies of France; and, superimposed, an inescutcheon bearing the Pontifical arms.

    The Life of Cesare Borgia

  • Dexter, the sable bars of the House of Lenzol; Sinister, the Borgia bull in chief, and the lilies of France; and, superimposed, an inescutcheon bearing the Pontifical arms.

    The Life of Cesare Borgia

  • Philip the Bold, by having an inescutcheon of pretence on the centre of the arms of Margaret de Maele, first assumed by his father, John the

    Illuminated Manuscripts

  • GEORGEĀ III., till 1816: -- The arms indicated in the diagram, No. 430, the inescutcheon ensigned with an electoral bonnet.

    The Handbook to English Heraldry

  • : -- The same arms as No. 430, but the inescutcheon ensigned with a Royal Crown.

    The Handbook to English Heraldry

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