Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The condition of being in action; operation.
  • n. The means or mode of acting; instrumentality.
  • n. A business or service authorized to act for others: an employment agency.
  • n. An administrative division of a government or international body.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The faculty of acting or of exerting power; the state of being in action; action; instrumentality.
  • n. agent
  • n. The office of an agent, or factor.
  • n. The relation between a principal and his agent.
  • n. Business of one entrusted with the concerns of another.
  • n. The place of business of an agent.
  • n. A bond issued by a US government-backed entity, such as Fannie Mae.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The faculty of acting or of exerting power; the state of being in action; action; instrumentality.
  • n. The office of an agent, or factor; the relation between a principal and his agent; business of one intrusted with the concerns of another.
  • n. The place of business of an agent.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state of being in action or of exerting power; action; operation; instrumentality.
  • n. A mode of exerting power; a means of producing effects.
  • n. The office of agent or factor; the business of an agent intrusted with the concerns of another: as, the principal pays the charges of agency.
  • n. The place of business of an agent.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the state of serving as an official and authorized delegate or agent
  • n. how a result is obtained or an end is achieved
  • n. the state of being in action or exerting power
  • n. an administrative unit of government
  • n. a business that serves other businesses

Etymologies

Medieval Latin agentia, from Latin agēns, agent-, present participle of agere, to do; see agent.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Medieval Latin agentia, from Latin agens (present participle of agere ("to act")), agentis (cognate with French agence, see also agent). (Wiktionary)

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