Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act of exacting.
  • n. Excessive or unjust demand; extortion.
  • n. Something exacted.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of demanding with authority, and compelling to pay or yield; compulsion to give or furnish; a levying by force; a driving to compliance; as, the exaction to tribute or of obedience; hence, extortion.
  • n. That which is exacted; a severe tribute; a fee, reward, or contribution, demanded or levied with severity or injustice.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of demanding with authority, and compelling to pay or yield; compulsion to give or furnish; a levying by force; a driving to compliance; ; hence, extortion.
  • n. That which is exacted; a severe tribute; a fee, reward, or contribution, demanded or levied with severity or injustice.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of demanding with authority and compelling to pay or yield; compulsory or authoritative demand; excessive or arbitrary requirement: as, the exaction of tribute or of obedience.
  • n. That which is exacted; a requisition; especially, something compulsorily required without right, or in excess of what is due or proper.
  • n. In law, a wrong done by an officer or one in pretended authority, by taking a reward or fee for that for which the law allows none. See extortion.
  • n. The calling of a party to answer. See exact, v., 4.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. act of demanding or levying by force or authority

Etymologies

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  • "Now he was smitten with compunction, yet irritated that so trifling an omission should be stored up against him after nearly two years of marriage. He was weary of living in a perpetual tepid honeymoon, without the temperature of passion yet with all its exactions."
    - Edith Wharton, 'The Age of Innocence'.

    September 19, 2009

  • For their spirits were broke and their manhood impair'd by foreign vices for exaction. (from Jubilate Agno by Christopher Smart)

    December 31, 2007