Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To do, perform, or perpetrate: commit a murder.
  • transitive v. To put in trust or charge; entrust: commit oneself to the care of a doctor; commit responsibilities to an assistant.
  • transitive v. To place officially in confinement or custody, as in a mental health facility.
  • transitive v. To consign for future use or reference or for preservation: commit the secret code to memory.
  • transitive v. To put into a place to be kept safe or to be disposed of.
  • transitive v. To make known the views of (oneself) on an issue: I never commit myself on such issues.
  • transitive v. To bind or obligate, as by a pledge: They were committed to follow orders.
  • transitive v. To refer (a legislative bill, for example) to a committee.
  • intransitive v. To pledge or obligate one's own self: felt that he was too young to commit fully to marriage.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To give in trust; to put into charge or keeping; to intrust; to consign; -- used with to, unto.
  • v. To put in charge of a jailor; to imprison.
  • v. To do; to perpetrate, as a crime, sin, or fault.
  • v. To join a contest; to match; -- followed by with.
  • v. To confound.
  • v. To commit an offence; especially, to fornicate.
  • n. The act of committing (e.g. a database transaction or source code into a source control repository), making it a permanent change.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To sin; esp., to be incontinent.
  • transitive v. To give in trust; to put into charge or keeping; to intrust; to consign; -- used with to, unto.
  • transitive v. To put in charge of a jailor; to imprison.
  • transitive v. To do; to perpetrate, as a crime, sin, or fault.
  • transitive v. To join for a contest; to match; -- followed by with.
  • transitive v. To pledge or bind; to compromise, expose, or endanger by some decisive act or preliminary step; -- often used reflexively.
  • transitive v. To confound.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To give in trust; put into charge or keeping; intrust; surrender; give up; consign: with to or unto.
  • To engage; involve; put or bring into risk or danger by a preliminary step or decision which cannot be recalled; compromise.
  • To consign to custody by official warrant, as a criminal or a lunatic; specifically, to send to prison for a short term or for trial.
  • In legislation, to refer or intrust to a committee or select number of persons for their consideration and report.
  • To memorize; learn by heart: a shortened colloquial form of the phrase to commit to memory: as, have you committed your speech?
  • To do or perform (especially something reprehensible, wrong, inapt, etc.); perpetrate: as, to commit murder, treason, felony, or trespass; to commit a blunder or a solecism.
  • To join or put together unfitly or heterogeneously; match improperly or incongruously; confound: a Latinism.
  • To consider; regard; account.
  • To speak or act in such a manner as virtually to bind one's self to a certain line of conduct, or to the approval of a certain opinion or course of action: as, he has committed himself to the support of the foreign policy of the government; avoid committing yourself.
  • Synonyms Intrust, Confide, Commit, Consign, agree in general in expressing a transfer from the care or keeping of one to that of another. To intrust is to give to another in trust, to put into another's care with confidence in him. Confide is still more expressive of trust or confidence, especially in the receiver's discretion or integrity; the word is now used most of secrets, but may be used more widely. Commit implies some measure of formality in the act; it is the most general of these words. Consign implies still greater formality in the surrender: as, to consign goods to a person for sale; to consign the dead to the grave. To consign seems the most final as an act; to commit stands next to it in this respect.
  • To commit adultery.
  • To consign to prison; to exercise the power of imprisoning.
  • n. A game of cards.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. give entirely to a specific person, activity, or cause
  • v. perform an act, usually with a negative connotation
  • v. cause to be admitted; of persons to an institution
  • v. confer a trust upon
  • v. make an investment
  • v. engage in or perform

Etymologies

Middle English committen, from Latin committere : com-, com- + mittere, to send.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin committere ("to bring together, join, compare, commit (a wrong), incur, give in charge, etc."), from com ("together") + mittere ("to send"). See mission. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • I knew my comment about ruepees was going to come back and bite me.

    I'm adding this to my list of found-poetry.

    May 10, 2012

  • A poem by Wiktionary (apologies to ruzuzu):

    to give in trust; to put into
    charge
    or keeping; to intrust; to consign;
    to put in
    charge
    of a jailor; to imprison.
    to do; to perpetrate, as a

    crime,
    sin, or
    fault.

    to join a contest; to match;
    to pledge or bind; to compromise,
    expose, or endanger
    by some decisive act or preliminary step; for example to
    commit oneself to a certain
    action, to
    commit oneself to doing
    something.

    to confound.

    to sin; especially, to
    be
    incontinent.

    May 10, 2012

  • I just added flew, which has 34 million g-hits. Commit has 85 million.

    July 9, 2008

  • Citation (in the sense of "cause to be admitted") on yell.

    n.b. What is the commonest word not yet added to Wordie?

    June 29, 2008