ruzuzu has adopted no words, looked up 0 words, created 830 lists, listed 39303 words, written 10535 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 2554 words.

Comments by ruzuzu

  • Would semordnilap count?

    October 4, 2022

  • I adore this list.

    October 4, 2022

  • Your wish, my command, &c.

    September 29, 2022

  • Also see Samson post.

    September 28, 2022

  • Gratiola amphiantha.

    September 19, 2022

  • Also known as "snorkelwort."

    September 19, 2022

  • See comment on azimuthally.

    September 14, 2022

  • You might also like the agentive-exocentric--v-n-n-compounds list by tankhughes.

    September 14, 2022

  • Oh, look! A delicious food pelleting!

    September 14, 2022

  • *press*

    September 14, 2022

  • There is spiroylic, though.

    September 7, 2022

  • That's fascinating. I'm not seeing anything in the OED or the 1895 version of the Century (see, e.g., http://www.micmap.org/dicfro/introduction/century-dictionary).

    September 7, 2022

  • Thanks, tankhughes. I used to play once a week, and I feel you've perfectly described each member of my former group. They eventually decided they'd rather get together to play Star Fleet Battles--and while I appreciate the idea of using a map of hexes instead of squares, I found having to stop and consult the rules in the middle of every battle was a bit tiresome. (When my friends play, they jokingly refer to themselves as space lawyers.)

    September 7, 2022

  • Thanks, alexz. I knew there had to be something.

    September 2, 2022

  • Ceci n'est pas une pipe.

    September 2, 2022

  • Dungeons and Dragons is a collaborative game based on storytelling. Each player is responsible for describing the actions of one character. The person running the game for them each session (the Dungeon Master) is like an omniscient narrator and provides each of the players with the setting--what the townspeople are doing, what the merchants might have for sale, what information innkeepers might have if the players' character were to simply ask, what random encounters might happen (based on the roll of the dice), including whether there are any monsters nearby that they could fight. Murderhobos don't care about any of the details--their characters just kill whatever or whomever they encounter.

    Edit: Maybe that's not a good translation. A murderhobo is a character that deals with every novel situation in the game by defaulting to death or destruction because it's all a fantasy world and they can do whatever they want there. It could just be the strategy of one player, or it could be the whole group. The hobo part comes from the fact that the characters tend to wander from place to place looking for adventure (or things to kill).

    September 2, 2022

  • There should be a name for this sort of thing. Lexicographer's paradox?

    Edit: Maybe it would be funnier to avoid defining it, though.

    September 1, 2022

  • Quiet enjoyment?

    August 31, 2022

  • I don't remember that ever happening on an almost Solveig tour, but boy were there some close calls with brown M&M's.

    August 31, 2022

  • Thanks tankhughes, this is fun! Some other words that show up near it in the Century are thaumasite, thaumatogeny, and thaumatrope.

    August 29, 2022

  • What do we think the definition from the Century means? ("See to haul back.") Is it like haul up or haul off?

    August 26, 2022

  • Bilby, I will indeed accept bumbastus--but only because of the first three letters.

    August 26, 2022

  • No, but I'll take this as the signal to start.

    August 26, 2022

  • I like that the American Heritage Dictionary notes that this has a "usage problem." I wonder how many other usage problems are out there.

    *wanders off to make a list*

    August 25, 2022

  • This is a fun list. Also see the list by tankhughes found here: abbreviations-into-acronyms-QGBtAKUtfn64-q-17Y0TZ.

    August 25, 2022

  • Also see dragon's-tail.

    August 24, 2022

  • Let's say you're hiking, and you drop a piece of glass on the trail. Eventually someone will walk along the trail and might cut themselves on the glass.

    You'd be really sorry to hear if it happens to someone you know in a week. But what if the victim lived thousands, even millions of years in the future?

    Philosopher William MacAskill, 35, likes to bring up this scenario to drive home a point: "If you're thinking about the possibility of harming someone, |it doesn't| really matter that person will be harmed next week or next year, or even in a hundred or a thousand years. Harm is harm."

    That's MacAskill's argument behind longtermism, a term he coined to describe the idea that humans have a moral responsibility to protect the future of humanity, prevent it from going extinct — and create a better future for many generations to come. He outlines this concept in his new book, What We Owe the Future.

    From "How can we help humans thrive trillions of years from now? This philosopher has a plan" by Malaka Gharib (https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2022/08/16/1114353811/how-can-we-help-humans-thrive-trillions-of-years-from-now-this-philosopher-has-a)

    August 24, 2022

  • See Paroncheilus affinis.

    August 24, 2022

  • One of the Century definitions ("The art or method of assisting the memory by associating the objects to be remembered with some place which is well known.") reminds me of a memory palace.

    August 15, 2022

  • Also see nostoc.

    August 15, 2022

  • "The name Nostoc was coined by Paracelsus and is a combination of the English nostril and German Nasenloch "nose hole, nostril", likely due to appearance of many species colonies being similar to nasal mucus."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Nostoc&oldid=1098615823

    August 15, 2022

  • See nostoc.

    August 15, 2022

  • See Boops boops.

    August 15, 2022

  • Also see comments on boops boops.

    August 15, 2022

  • See comment on idempotent.

    August 9, 2022

  • From the Wikipedia page for Benjamin Peirce: "In algebra, he was notable for the study of associative algebras. He first introduced the terms idempotent and nilpotent in 1870 to describe elements of these algebras, and he also introduced the Peirce decomposition." (https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Benjamin_Peirce&oldid=1079065220)

    August 9, 2022

  • Cf. lemniscate.

    August 8, 2022

  • I know it's fashionable to go solo, but there's always a spot for you in almost Solveig.

    August 5, 2022

  • If we don't, I nominate you to make one for us. (Actually, even if we do, I still nominate you to make your own for our amusement.)

    August 4, 2022

  • See gemel.

    August 3, 2022

  • Not what I was expecting.

    August 3, 2022

  • I just got gnathostegite as a random word.

    August 3, 2022

  • Ooh! An open list!

    August 2, 2022

  • See comments on quaternion.

    August 2, 2022

  • Bulla?

    August 2, 2022

  • May 35?

    August 2, 2022

  • I think it's great (which probably says something about my own lists).

    August 2, 2022

  • I'm reminded of the joke about a grasshopper that walks in to a bar. The bartender says, "Hey, we have a drink named after you," and the grasshopper says, "You have a drink named Steve?"

    August 2, 2022

  • You know me too well.

    July 28, 2022

  • That's fun, Bilby. What era is that from?

    July 28, 2022

  • What a fun list!

    July 27, 2022

  • I like your lists.

    July 27, 2022

  • Why did ruzuzu cross the road? To create an open list.

    July 27, 2022

  • That sounds like a perfectly valid reason to cross the road, tankhughes.

    July 27, 2022

  • "Chick-weed" makes me think of Twelfth Night: "Give me thy hand, And let me see thee in thy woman’s weeds."

    July 27, 2022

  • I like your lists.

    July 25, 2022

  • Ah, man. Sorry. I guess the list is sealed.

    In the meantime, you can send me suggestions. (I'll do some experiments to see whether this has something to do with how I'm creating these lists.)

    July 25, 2022

  • Oh! That's a good one, w. I've also heard people say "I,D" for id. (cf. ibid).

    July 22, 2022

  • I hadn't, but I will now.

    July 20, 2022

  • Hm. Ploughshares cut into swards.

    July 20, 2022

  • Has anyone made this into a list yet? It would be hilarious to have jean dimmock as a random entry on a jean dimmock list.

    July 19, 2022

  • I like your lists.

    July 18, 2022

  • (I was beginning to lose faith in the notion that every potential list is an existing list.)

    July 18, 2022

  • Is it possible that we don't have any lists about seals yet?

    Edit: Ah. here's a seals-and-sea-lions list, at least.

    July 18, 2022

  • I arrived here after getting wantaways as a random word.

    July 18, 2022

  • I like your lists.

    July 18, 2022

  • Your lists amuse me every time you make one.

    July 18, 2022

  • *trips silent alarm*

    July 18, 2022

  • Oh, jinx! I was just coming here to say that about states. Some people's names do this, too: Jo, Ed, etc. (though then there's the whole Elizabeth, Margaret, Betsy, and Bess thing to ponder).

    Edit: Wait. Duh. Are you just looking for the ones where you'd say it like an initialism? (In which case this list is even cooler.)

    July 13, 2022

  • Puffballs were traditionally used in Tibet for making ink by burning them, grinding the ash, then putting them in water and adding glue liquid and "a nye shing ma decoction", which, when pressed for a long time, made a black dark substance that was used as ink. Rural Americans likewise burned the common puffball with some kind of bee smoker to anesthetize honey bees as a means to safely procure honey; the practice later inspired experimental medicinal application of the puffball smoke as a surgical general anesthetic in 1853.

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Puffball&oldid=1077613917

    July 12, 2022

  • See barometz.

    July 12, 2022

  • Umbrage! This otherwise perfect list contains no mention of the Vegetable Lamb of Tartary.

    July 12, 2022

  • I started out specifically looking for words with "professional wrestling slang" in their definitions, but feel free to make more suggestions (I somehow uncharacteristically created this as a closed list).

    July 12, 2022

  • Brackets around "Skinner box Flavour Delivery AlgorithmTM" please.

    July 8, 2022

  • Oh, look! A delicious food pellet list!

    July 7, 2022

  • *presses lever*

    July 7, 2022

  • Nicolson pavement, alternatively spelled "Nicholson" and denominated wooden block pavement and wood block pavement, is a road surface material consisting of wooden blocks. Samuel Nicolson invented it in the mid-19th century. Wooden block pavement has since become unfavored because of its poor surface quality and high cost of maintenance.

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Nicolson_pavement&oldid=1024698411

    July 6, 2022

  • Wheat germ, I think.

    July 6, 2022

  • Oh, look! A delicious food pellet!

    July 5, 2022

  • What a great list!

    July 5, 2022

  • *presses lever*

    July 5, 2022

  • Bilby just found coinventorship.

    June 7, 2022

  • Oh, tankhughes, that's marvelous. Thank you! Of course the brilliant sionnach already has a list.

    June 7, 2022

  • This is great! Is there a name for words such as this—words which are made of other complete words? For instance, I’m thinking carrot is made of car and rot.

    June 4, 2022

  • I'm reminded of one of my favorite jokes: Why do witches wear black? So you can't tell which witch is which.

    May 13, 2022

  • I have to admit that I never knew there was a word for this. That'll learn me. Guess I should find myself a good old-fashioned husking bee.

    April 28, 2022

  • Thanks!

    April 28, 2022

  • I like your lists. Welcome to Wordnik!

    April 28, 2022

  • List me, like you did by the lake on Naboo!

    April 28, 2022

  • Right? I was also thinking democracy, the internet, biofilms... certain kinds of ice or glass.

    April 12, 2022

  • My new favorite list.

    April 12, 2022

  • Often as I’m waking up from a dream, there will be one last word or phrase that lingers. Today it was a riddle: Name something that feels old and structured, but isn’t.

    April 12, 2022

  • I love this list.

    April 6, 2022

  • *stalls*

    April 4, 2022

  • Me? A stalwart? Aw shucks.

    March 30, 2022

  • I've read that POUND, CRANE, and SALET (a variation on sallet) are good to start with, but I like STAMP and STARE.

    March 30, 2022

  • I looked up the postal code--7458 must be near 7457. They're both in Hungary.

    March 22, 2022

  • Oh, yay! Hi possibleunderscore!

    *waves*

    March 17, 2022

  • And hi rolig!

    March 16, 2022

  • I'm still discovering entries that had gotten the wordie treatment--often when I'm looking up something that I thought was new, but that bilby already entered a citation for in 2009.

    Hi bilby from 2009!

    March 16, 2022

  • Likewise, vm.

    March 15, 2022

  • This list is fantastic.

    March 15, 2022

  • "The phenomenon that (Bradley) Voytek and other scientists are investigating in a variety of ways goes by many names. Some call it “the 1/f slope” or “scale-free activity”; Voytek has pushed to rebrand it “the aperiodic signal” or “aperiodic activity.”"

    -- "Brain’s ‘Background Noise’ May Hold Clues to Persistent Mysteries" by Elizabeth Landau (https://www.quantamagazine.org/brains-background-noise-may-hold-clues-to-persistent-mysteries-20210208/)

    March 15, 2022

  • I just looked it up again--it's a prime number (but it seems to be a rather boring one).

    March 15, 2022

  • Miss you, qms.

    March 15, 2022

  • My new favorite list--and currently the only one that lists injective.

    March 15, 2022

  • I like your lists.

    March 11, 2022

  • Those are fantastic, vendingmachine. Thank you!

    March 10, 2022

  • See chrysocolla.

    March 9, 2022

  • Please sir, I want some more entries on my list.

    March 4, 2022

  • See heart urchin, and compare egg-urchin.

    March 3, 2022

  • Thank you. You've just captured all my feelings about The Century Dictionary in general.

    March 3, 2022

  • Would caries count? (I'm thinking dental caries.)

    March 2, 2022

  • That's exciting, tankhughes. Congratulations!

    March 2, 2022

  • Oh, I am so there.

    March 2, 2022

  • My *new* new favorite list.

    March 2, 2022

  • Oh, yes--dancing the St. Giles's hornpipe sounds delightful, too.

    March 1, 2022

  • This is my new favorite list.

    March 1, 2022

  • I can't believe I'm the first person to list this.

    March 1, 2022

  • See bane.

    March 1, 2022

  • "A disease in sheep, more commonly called the rot."

    --Century Dictionary

    March 1, 2022

  • See the comments on vegetarian if you dare.

    March 1, 2022

  • I thought you were a veg*n.

    March 1, 2022

  • See citation on Zealandia.

    February 22, 2022

  • Then in the 1960s, geologists finally agreed on a definition of what a continent is – broadly, a geological area with a high elevation, wide variety of rocks, and a thick crust. It also has to be big. "You just can't be a tiny piece," says |Nick| Mortimer. This gave geologists something to work with – if they could collect the evidence, they could prove that the eighth continent was real.

    Still, the mission stalled – discovering a continent is tricky and expensive, and Mortimer points out that there was no urgency. Then in 1995, the American geophysicist Bruce Luyendyk again described the region as a continent and suggested calling it Zealandia.

    -- "The missing continent it took 375 years to find" (https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20210205-the-last-secrets-of-the-worlds-lost-continent)

    February 22, 2022

  • One of |Jack| Gallant’s graduate students at the time, Alex Huth, used the Gallant lab’s cutting-edge techniques to analyze where the brain might encode different kinds of visual information. Huth, Gallant and their colleagues had participants watch hours of silent videos while inside fMRI scanners. Then, segmenting the data into records for roughly pea-size volumes of brain tissue called voxels, they analyzed the scans to determine where hundreds of objects and actions were represented across the cortex.

    -- "New Map of Meaning in the Brain Changes Ideas About Memory" (https://www.quantamagazine.org/new-map-of-meaning-in-the-brain-changes-ideas-about-memory-20220208/)

    February 22, 2022

  • I have relatives near Jeff City, I lived down by Springfield for a semester, and I have yet to hear anyone there say "Miz-ur-uh."

    February 16, 2022

  • This is my new favorite list.

    February 15, 2022

  • Thanks, vm, I'm fond of it too. I especially appreciate the sandhills, but there are a lot of scenic spots if you're brave enough to venture off of I-80.

    February 15, 2022

  • Here's a link to more exaggeration postcards from nebraksa: https://history.nebraska.gov/blog/exaggeration-postcards (my favorite is the grasshopper).

    February 15, 2022

  • I knew there had to be a sausage list around here somewhere! I've got an open list, but I'll be yoinking plenty of these.

    February 14, 2022

  • "A karst window, also known as a karst fenster, is a geomorphic feature found in karst landscapes where an underground river is visible from the surface within a sinkhole."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Karst_window&oldid=1065338450

    February 10, 2022

  • Hm. I see that sausage body is also here. Is there already a sausage list somewhere?

    February 10, 2022

  • See comment on Georg Christoph Lichtenberg.

    February 9, 2022

  • Georg Christoph Lichtenberg was a well-known German physicist and satirist in the 18-th century. Honoured as an extraordinary professor of physics at the University of Göttingen, he was known to be one of the first scientists to introduce experiments with apparatus in their lectures.

    He also maintained relations with other great German figures of the era such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Immanuel Kant. Legendary mathematician Karl Friedrich Gauss is known to have sat on Lichtenberg’s lectures. He is also well known for his discovery of tree-like electrical discharge patterns which came to be known as Lichtenberg figures.

    -- From "How You Really Use Mathematics To Define Paper Size" (https://www.cantorsparadise.com/how-you-really-use-mathematics-to-define-paper-size-c2928ba551ec)

    February 9, 2022

  • This is my new favorite list.

    February 9, 2022

  • I have some nice vegan fufluns right here--it's a new recipe. Let me know what you think.

    February 7, 2022

  • "Whenever the TRAHOR FATIS inscription appears, it is accompanied by a seven–pointed “bearded” star (pogonius), raining influence toward Earth and its denizens."

    -- From "A Renaissance Riddle: The Sola Busca Tarot Deck (1491)" (https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/sola-busca)

    February 3, 2022

  • See ru open list zuzu.

    February 3, 2022

  • Sometimes it's hard to switch back and forth once a list has been started--but the moment I can list things, I will.

    After all, open list is my middle name.

    February 3, 2022

  • Thanks v--I would, but it doesn't seem to be an open list.

    February 2, 2022

  • A variation on the card game hearts:

    Heartsette is another very early variant that is still played. Its distinguishing feature is a widow. When four play, the 2♠ is removed, twelve cards are dealt to each player and the remaining three cards are placed face down in the centre of the table to form the widow. For other numbers of players, the full pack is used, the widow comprising three cards when three play, two when five play and four when six play. The player winning the first trick takes in the widow and any hearts it contains. That player may look at these cards but may not show them to anyone. Otherwise, the game is played as normal. The key difference from basic Hearts is that the first winner is the only one who knows how many and which hearts are still to be played.

    From https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hearts_(card_game)&oldid=1069036466

    February 2, 2022

  • I think there are various Albions, too--one in Nebraska, one in Iowa.

    February 1, 2022

  • Nebraska can offer Geneva, Peru, Cairo, Syracuse, York, Prague, and Gothenburg, among others--but there used to be more: Lancaster was renamed Lincoln in 1869, and Berlin changed to Otoe in 1918.

    February 1, 2022

  • Also see terrella.

    January 28, 2022

  • See comment on able.

    January 28, 2022

  • From the Online Etymology Dictionary:

    Able seaman, one able to do any sort of work required on a ship, may be the origin of this:

    "Able-whackets - A popular sea-game with cards, in which the loser is beaten over the palms of the hands with a handkerchief tightly twisted like a rope. Very popular with horny-fisted sailors. |Smyth, "Sailor's Word-Book," 1867|"

    (See https://www.etymonline.com/word/Able)

    January 28, 2022

  • Thanks, vm! Wahoo!

    January 20, 2022

  • Oh, fun! Will you accept two-word phrases? (I'm thinking bull-beef and bull thistles, &c.)

    January 20, 2022

  • Thank you, yarb. I'm surprised mollusque hasn't listed more of these.

    January 19, 2022

  • "The researchers, based in Singapore, Denmark and Poland, chose a tardigrade to try to entangle because of its ability to enter long hibernation to withstand things like searing heat, freezing cold, extraordinarily high pressures, and high levels of ionizing radiation. This hibernation is called cryptobiosis; the animal desiccates, shedding the moisture from its body, and only reanimates when conditions become more manageable."

    -- "Scientists Tried to Quantum Entangle a Tardigrade" by Isaac Schultz (https://gizmodo.com/scientists-tried-to-quantum-entangle-a-tardigrade-1848377578)

    January 19, 2022

  • I can't believe I'm the first person to list this.

    January 18, 2022

  • "Typically, Socrates' opponent would make what would seem to be an innocuous assertion. In response, Socrates, via a step-by-step train of reasoning, bringing in other background assumptions, would make the person admit that the assertion resulted in an absurd or contradictory conclusion, forcing him to abandon his assertion and adopt a position of aporia."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Reductio_ad_absurdum&oldid=1053094000

    December 28, 2021

  • Also see sop.

    December 27, 2021

  • What a fun list!

    December 21, 2021

  • "A version of a folk tale about a girl made of snow and named Snegurka (Snezhevinochka; Снегурка (Снежевиночка)) was published in 1869 by Alexander Afanasyev in the second volume of his work The Poetic Outlook on Nature by the Slavs, where he also mentions the German analog, Schneekind ("Snow Child")."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Snegurochka&oldid=1057246156

    December 16, 2021

  • Snegurka.

    December 16, 2021

  • See the definition on cib.

    December 13, 2021

  • *trips silent alarm*

    December 2, 2021

  • (No mention of using soup as a dye for leather, though.)

    December 2, 2021

  • Oh, ew. The Century has given us this gem: "In leather-coloring, to apply a coating of blood to, in order to obtain a good black."

    December 2, 2021

  • Now I'm wondering about the etymology of blood.

    December 2, 2021

  • For what it's worth, I'm looking at the online version of the OED (through my library's subscription), and I see the following:

    "a1340 R. Rolle Psalter xvii. 11 He maked his son to take fleisse and blode.

    1393 W. Langland Piers Plowman C. ii. 153 Whanne hit hadde of þe folde flesch and blod ytake.

    1509 Parlyament Deuylles (de Worde) lxxii I..toke flesshe and blode a mayde within.

    1598 W. Shakespeare Love's Labour's Lost i. i. 186 I would see his owne person in flesh and blood."

    December 2, 2021

  • Not what I was expecting.

    November 19, 2021

  • Welcome! Nice to see a fellow fan of The Century.

    I just saw your question over on the page for the word synchronously. Generally, the best way to show a word is one of your favorites is to log in and select "love" at the top of the page for that word. Hope that helps!

    November 19, 2021

  • It did occur to me to wonder whether trink and drink were related.

    There's an old klezmer song called "Skrip, klezmerl, skripe" where an uncle sings "kh’vel trinken vi a fish/ un vel tantsn bay der khupe," which is translated as "Now I will drink like a fish/ and dance by the wedding canopy," (See here: https://www.milkenarchive.org/music/volumes/view/great-songs-of-the-american-yiddish-stage/work/skrip-klezmerl-skripe/).

    But, also, do folks still get thrown "into the drink"? And could we then use a trink to rescue them?

    November 19, 2021

  • Compare trench and tranche.

    November 18, 2021

  • Compare cow pie.

    November 1, 2021

  • Cf. cow pat.

    November 1, 2021

  • See comments on ahuruhuru.

    October 26, 2021

  • Umbrage! Everyone knows it's wasteful to use only half a ruzuzu. What'll you do, stick the ruz in the fridge with some lemon juice? Throw the uzu away? Feh.

    October 26, 2021

  • Oh, hey, ruzuzu from 2018--thank you. I was stuck on this again.

    This time I'll add that C.S. Peirce also wrote about abduction, but it's the kind of rabbit hole that leads one to muttering about confectio Damocritis.

    October 19, 2021

  • "The term “abduction” was coined by Charles Sanders Peirce in his work on the logic of science. He introduced it to denote a type of non-deductive inference that was different from the already familiar inductive type."

    -- From the "Peirce on Abduction" section of the online Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/abduction/peirce.html)

    October 19, 2021

  • This is my new favorite list.

    October 13, 2021

  • I think it's where they play jai alai.

    October 13, 2021

  • Adding this to the list of qms poems.

    October 11, 2021

  • Smiting seems more like an -ectomy.

    September 28, 2021

  • Not sure why bilby is anti-anthesis.

    September 25, 2021

  • Aha! Here it is.

    September 21, 2021

  • Do we have any penny lists?

    September 20, 2021

  • "The Flower of Kent is a green cultivar of cooking apple. According to the story, this is the apple Isaac Newton saw falling to ground from its tree, inspiring his laws of universal gravitation. It is pear-shaped, mealy, and sub-acid, and of generally poor quality by today's standards. As its name suggests, this cultivar likely originated from Kent, England."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Flower_of_Kent&oldid=992761945

    September 13, 2021

  • See biquinary.

    September 6, 2021

  • I hadn't--but I sure will now!

    September 6, 2021

  • See wherry.

    August 27, 2021

  • Not what I was expecting.

    August 27, 2021

  • See odd-come-shortly.

    August 25, 2021

  • Also see herb-robert.

    August 25, 2021

  • I like your lists.

    August 25, 2021

  • Oh. Here's one. (See comment on passing-bell.)

    August 25, 2021

  • Do we have any bell lists yet?

    August 25, 2021

  • Big hugs from me, too. So very sorry for your loss.

    August 24, 2021

  • See takotsubo.

    August 24, 2021

  • "The name "takotsubo" comes from the Japanese word takotsubo "octopus trap", because the left ventricle of the heart takes on a shape resembling an octopus trap when affected by this condition."

    -- From Wikipedia's takotsubo cardiomyopathy page (https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Takotsubo_cardiomyopathy&oldid=1032145059)

    August 24, 2021

  • Ooh. Do we need a new list? I know there are some parasite lists here, but do we need something a bit more specific?

    August 22, 2021

  • Maybe just one more.

    *press*

    August 21, 2021

  • Mphfh.

    *coughs*

    It’s okay.

    *press*

    August 21, 2021

  • *press*

    August 21, 2021

  • Can I get a ruling on whether tapeworms belong on this list or the other list? See here: https://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/alaskan-bears-occasionally-trail-meterslong-tapeworms-from-their-behinds/

    August 20, 2021

  • *press*

    August 19, 2021

  • I love it when my fufluns have grape riffles.

    August 19, 2021

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Comments for ruzuzu

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  • I just noticed for the first time your kind comment on my profile!! Thank you!! I like your lists! They've served as many an inspiration for me.

    March 29, 2018

  • Yum! Thanks.

    May 17, 2016

  • Hey zuzu, hummus detected at botryoidal!

    May 17, 2016

  • so myriad led to banzai via tags and I added that...therefore banzai, ruzuzuzuzuzu

    July 20, 2015

  • Thank you, bilby. As you know, I'm also fond of misheard-numa-numa-lyrics.

    June 22, 2015

  • This made me think of you: http://www.metrolyrics.com/song-ml-video-cea.html

    It was probably the bananaphone.

    June 18, 2015

  • I only just recently noticed that there's a comments section! Yikes! Anyways, unreal-laurens-friend-finder is up and running and needs contributions! So many exclamation points!

    June 16, 2015

  • Eek! TankHughes, I'm glad I was able to point out that list to you, but I'm sorry to contribute to the demise of another. May I console myself with the thought that you'll eventually replace it with a new list for our amusement?

    April 23, 2015

  • I'd respond to you on my list... BUT I DELETED IT! *shock* It made more sense to add my 4 to tbtabby's Location Slang list instead. I'm happy someone else has made a large list that I can legitimately add Canadian tuxedo and Mexican wave to.

    April 21, 2015

  • Thank you for your kind comment of December 15, ruzuzu. It pains me to have overlooked your comment for so long but, in the absence of the Community page, I seem to have been looking in the wrong places for evidence of activity. I had begun to fear that I was the only one still visiting regularly.

    When I last communicated with Erin she wrote that she had a fix for the Community page but was having difficulty getting it installed on the server. I think it is possible we will not have the Community page back until after the holidays. I hope people will not have lost the habit of visiting.

    I hope your holidays are happy ones.

    December 22, 2014

  • Nope. Just dry pita pocket editions.

    August 11, 2014

  • Hey babe, read any good hummus books lately?

    August 10, 2014

  • Thanks, bilby. I needed that.

    July 21, 2014

  • Can you ask around for me then? I'm sure they come from Riga.

    *chortle chortle chortle*

    July 18, 2014

  • I'm really only a half-Lat. I have no idea what a marole is.

    July 18, 2014

  • What is a marole? I thought I might as well ask a Latvian.

    July 18, 2014

  • I don't know of a list for obsolete and disused science terms. Maybe time to start one?

    May 11, 2014

  • I vote we name the inherent sound of fun ruzuzurrus

    March 19, 2014

  • And so do I!

    But I don't understand how we are supposed to find this █████ comment box on one's profile.

    February 21, 2014

  • Hi ruzuzu. Bovine traces detected over at jomo.

    December 13, 2013

  • Hey ruzuzu, I have tripled the length of your calculator words list - hope you like it!

    May 13, 2013

  • I haven't heard her perform. I did have a chance to listen to her read some of her poems. She did them more than justice!

    April 16, 2013

  • I knew she plays the sax. Have you read 'Crazy Brave' yet?

    I wonder how many people realize the etymological significance of the title.

    Playing the sax is 'crazy brave' of course.

    The sax is the ultimate soul instrument with its long neck and throaty sound (see nephesh)

    My niece Ramona has taught me that well!

    She has 'crazy brave' in her blood, too.

    April 16, 2013

  • Me? Why?

    *retaliates with a volley of fufluns*

    January 28, 2013

  • Fonk you, ruzuzu.

    January 28, 2013

  • gallbladder!

    December 13, 2012

  • Spent the past half-hour reading your lists and almost choking on them. Love you!

    December 5, 2012

  • Thanks for sharper ruzuzu!

    November 8, 2012

  • um............................... hi

    October 4, 2012

  • "ruzuzu has looked up 87912 words"

    OMG get a life u loser. seriously who looks up words and then comonts on them like...pfft

    July 24, 2012

  • *yawn*

    July 22, 2012

  • Ruzuzu you smell and your stupid and i think ur dumb 2 44s i mene wtf u evn @m a& u no wht i mee????????.....

    July 22, 2012

  • Thanks for the red admiral! By the way, I borrowed some of your spiders for my own little collection.

    July 10, 2012

  • Hi ruzuzu.

    It took me a while to find this reply box.

    Thank you for the welcome message.

    Please feel free to comment on my lists or add words to them.

    Robert

    May 22, 2012

  • Hello,

    Am a young single girl never married seeking true love for a long term relationship with marriage potentials,i am happy to contact you because you cut my interest! i will love us to be good friends or a lot more, you can contact me through.(aisha.arop@hotmail.com)so that i will send you my photos,till i hear from you, bye and kisses!

    Miss Aisha

    May 16, 2012

  • Huh! Can't even make the pronunciations play at "hot dog"....go figure. ACK!

    April 25, 2012

  • So, the feedback page is otiose? 'Zu, are you able to create pronunciations? I'm having no luck at all. Is it broke? Can we access pronunciations of old?

    April 25, 2012

  • And I less than three you! Miss you guys. You know how it feels sometimes, though... I visit often but can't find anything to add to the conversation.

    I really wish there was an easier way to follow threads. If you don't spend lots of time here, you have to open all links on the Zeitmunity page. There has to be a different way!

    March 29, 2012

  • Thanks, 'zu. I probably would have found it eventually if I'd spent more time. Cheers!

    March 16, 2012

  • oh thank you, good catch!

    February 1, 2012

  • Thanks! Start -geddon ready to add some words...

    http://www.wordnik.com/lists/geddon--1

    January 29, 2012

  • Glad you liked my definition of Bulgar - I'm a total newbie. Don't know how to create a list, or what its purpose is, or how to use it, etc. Tips?

    January 20, 2012

  • hututu....??

    search engine optimization service

    January 15, 2012

  • What's all the fuss about <3' secret messages? Ah! I see! Can it really be as simple as hiding messages behind' hearts?

    January 14, 2012

  • Perhaps I'm <3' not' as smart as I think I am.

    January 13, 2012

  • Hmm.

    January 13, 2012

  • Dear ruzuzu,

    You are <3' the opposite of' a terrible bore.

    Yours with no <3' thing but' fondness,

    Yarb.

    January 13, 2012

  • Thanks, Pro!

    January 13, 2012

  • <3'<3'<3'

    January 13, 2012