Comments by ruzuzu

  • Test.

    August 17, 2017

  • See usage example on guaiacol.

    August 17, 2017

  • "The researchers focused on a small amphipathic compound known as guaiacol. This molecule is linked with the smoky taste that develops when malted barley is smoked on peat fires, and is far more common in Scottish whiskies than in American or Irish ones, the researchers said."

    -- https://www.livescience.com/60158-why-whiskey-tastes-good-diluted.html#undefined.uxfs

    August 17, 2017

  • "The biggest limitation to this research may be the definition of swaddling itself. The authors of the study acknowledge one of the “several” limitations to their meta-analysis is the fact that none of the studies they reviewed clearly outlined what constitutes a swaddle. And besides that, as anyone who has tried to swaddle a baby can confirm, good swaddling takes practice. Many parents, for fear of too tightly wrapping their babies, end up swaddling too loosely, which is itself a suffocation hazard. (Some daycare centers in the United States don’t allow swaddling for this reason.)"

    -- https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2016/05/is-swaddling-safe/482055/

    August 16, 2017

  • "The term "sousveillance", coined by Steve Mann, stems from the contrasting French words sur, meaning "above", and sous, meaning "below", i.e. "surveillance" denotes the "eye-in-the-sky" watching from above, whereas "sousveillance" denotes bringing the camera or other means of observation down to human level, either physically (mounting cameras on people rather than on buildings), or hierarchically (ordinary people doing the watching, rather than higher authorities or architectures doing the watching)."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Sousveillance&oldid=788558213

    August 16, 2017

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "n. A place where pies, tarts, etc., are made.

    "n. Viands made of paste, or of which paste constitutes a principal ingredient; particularly, the crust or cover of a pie, tart, or the like."

    August 11, 2017

  • I prefer fufluns.

    August 11, 2017

  • Another great one. Thanks, qms.

    August 11, 2017

  • "In music of the Renaissance and early Baroque eras, a bicinium (pl. bicinia) was a composition for only two parts, especially one for the purpose of teaching counterpoint or singing."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bicinium&oldid=782797821

    August 10, 2017

  • Is it weird that I think those weevils are kinda cute?

    August 9, 2017

  • Compare counternutation.

    August 9, 2017

  • "Nutation and counternutation refer to movement of the sacrum defined by the rotation of the promontory downwards and anteriorly, as with lumbar extension (nutation); or upwards and posteriorly, as with lumbar flexion (counternutation)."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Anatomical_terms_of_motion&oldid=778251662

    August 9, 2017

  • Arcades ambo.

    August 9, 2017

  • Nice one, qms!

    August 9, 2017

  • "Few neuroscientists still believe in an immaterial soul. Yet many follow Descartes in claiming that conscious experience involves awareness of a ‘thinking thing’: the self. There is an emerging consensus that such self-awareness is actually a form of bodily awareness, produced (at least in part) by interoception, our ability to monitor and detect autonomic and visceral processes. For example, the feeling of an elevated heart rate can provide information to the embodied organism that it is in a dangerous or difficult situation."

    -- https://aeon.co/essays/psychedelics-work-by-violating-our-models-of-self-and-the-world

    August 8, 2017

  • See comments on torks, torque, etc.

    August 7, 2017

  • There were a couple of examples over on torked.

    August 7, 2017

  • "As the name suggests, the original function of a millwright was the construction of flour mills, sawmills, paper mills and fulling mills powered by water or wind, mostly of wood with a limited number of metal parts. Since both of these structures originated from antiquity, millwrighting could be considered, arguably, as one of the oldest engineering trades and the forerunner of the modern mechanical engineer.

    In modern usage, a millwright is engaged with the erection of machinery. This includes such tasks as leveling, aligning and installing machinery on foundations or base plates and setting, leveling and aligning electric motors or other power sources such as turbines with the equipment, which millwrights typically connect with some type of coupling."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Millwright&oldid=785197392

    August 4, 2017

  • See comment on viologen.

    August 2, 2017

  • "The name is because this class of compounds is easily reduced to the radical mono cation, which is colored intensely blue.

    Possibly the best-known viologen is paraquat, which is one of the world's most widely used herbicides."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Viologen&oldid=792580672

    August 2, 2017

  • "A bit of calm doesn’t sound so bad, but the sedative dose of bromide is too near bromide’s toxicity level. Plus, bromide can accumulate in our bodies. Back in the 1930s-1950s, overuse of bromide products led to appropriately named medical conditions. Bromide-induced coma was dubbed ‘the bromide sleep’. General bromide toxicity was ‘bromism’. Outside medicine, if you were just a bit of a bore you were insultingly called a ‘bromide’."

    -- From "Brominated vegetable oil" by Raychelle Burks (https://www.chemistryworld.com/podcasts/brominated-vegetable-oil/9527.article)

    See, also: brominated vegetable oil, creaming.

    July 28, 2017

  • See comment on creaming.

    July 28, 2017

  • Short for brominated vegetable oil. See comment on creaming.

    July 28, 2017

  • "Brominated vegetable oil, called BVO for short, is made by adding bromine across the double bonds of certain fatty acids in vegetable oil, usually soybean oil. Like plain vegetable oil, BVO does a good job of dissolving water-insoluble food flavour, fragrance and colouring agents, serving as a carrier for these agents in soft drinks, which are mostly water. Neither plain vegetable oil or BVO is water soluble, but we can make oil/water emulsions, dispersing tiny droplets of flavour-carrying oil throughout a soda solution.

    "But why use BVO when plain ol’ vegetable oil could work? Density. Over time, gravity does its job and the emulsion breaks down, causing the oil and water to separate. If a plain vegetable oil is used, the oil fraction – which contains those all-important flavouring agents – would float to the top. Food scientists call this ‘creaming’."

    -- From "Brominated vegetable oil" by Raychelle Burks (https://www.chemistryworld.com/podcasts/brominated-vegetable-oil/9527.article)

    July 28, 2017

  • What a delightful list!

    July 20, 2017

  • See iPhone.

    July 20, 2017

  • I just arrived here after clicking on lixiviate. What a nice list!

    July 19, 2017

  • See additional definitions on Kali.

    July 19, 2017

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "n. The plant Salsola Kali, the prickly saltwort or glasswort. See alkali and Salsola.

    n. Potash: so called by German chemists. Also kalin.

    n. A carpet with a long pile, as distinguished from the carpets without nap.

    n. The largest in the set of carpets commonly used in a Persian room, filling the center of the room."

    n. For words beginning thus, see cali-."

    July 19, 2017

  • luthien13: Welcome to Wordnik!

    bilby: I totally read that as ADHD.

    July 17, 2017

  • *press*

    July 14, 2017

  • Oh look! A delicious food pellet!

    July 14, 2017

  • I love that bunny salad and drum major salad appear right next to each other on this list.

    July 14, 2017

  • *waits*

    July 13, 2017

  • *sends telepathic button-pushing signal*

    July 13, 2017

  • Ooh! Does anyone have a theremin I can borrow?

    July 13, 2017

  • See citation on pyrethrum.

    July 12, 2017

  • See citation on pyrethrum.

    July 12, 2017

  • From the Century:

    "n. A powdered preparation of pyrethrum, used as an insectifuge. Also called pyrethrum-powder. See insect-powder and buhach.

    n. In pharmacy, the Anacyclus Pyrethrum, or pellitory-of-Spain."

    July 12, 2017

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "A young one; a boy, babe, bairn, urchin, chit, chicken, sapling, etc."

    July 11, 2017

  • "On the occasion of receiving his degree in 1536, Ramus allegedly took as his thesis Quaecumque ab Aristotele dicta essent, commentitia esse, which Walter J. Ong paraphrases as follows: 'All the things that Aristotle has said are inconsistent because they are poorly systematized and can be called to mind only by the use of arbitrary mnemonic devices.'"

    -- https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrus_Ramus

    July 2, 2017

  • See comment on Ars magna.

    July 2, 2017

  • "One of the most significant changes between the original and the second version of the Art was in the visuals used. The early version used 16 figures presented as complex, complementary trees, while the system of the Ars Magna featured only four, including one which combined the other three. This figure, a "Lullian Circle," took the form of a paper machine operated by rotating concentrically arranged circles to combine his symbolic alphabet, which was repeated on each level. These combinations were said to show all possible truth about the subject of inquiry."

    -- https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramon_Llull

    July 2, 2017

  • See comment on Herborn Encyclopaedists.

    July 1, 2017

  • See comment on Herborn Encyclopaedists.

    July 1, 2017

  • "Leibniz’s broader vision of the power of logical calculation was inspired by many thinkers — from the logical works of Aristotle and Ramus to Thomas Hobbes’s proposal to equate reasoning with computation. But Leibniz’s curiosity around the art of combinations per se was sparked by a group called the “Herborn Encyclopaedists” through whom he became acquainted with the works of Ramon Llull, a Majorcan philosopher, logician, and mystical thinker who is thought to have died seven centuries ago this year. Llull’s Ars magna (or “ultimate general art”) from 1308 outlines a form of analysis and argumentation based on working with different permutations of a small number of fundamental attributes."

    -- http://publicdomainreview.org/2016/11/10/let-us-calculate-leibniz-llull-and-computational-imagination/

    July 1, 2017

  • Wikipedia says "the term elephant test refers to situations in which an idea or thing, 'is hard to describe, but instantly recognizable when spotted'."

    See https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Duck_test&oldid=785523971

    June 30, 2017

  • "And sometimes your gut distress isn’t caused by a germ at all. It could be an overdose of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols, known in public health circles as Fodmaps. These are essentially carbohydrates that, eaten in excess, are not well absorbed in the small intestine and then make their way into your colon to cause all kinds of trouble. They include myriad things we’re encouraged to eat including broccoli, brussels sprouts, radicchio, asparagus, avocados, mushrooms, peaches, whole grains and legumes."

    -- "What to Blame for Your Stomach Bug? Not Always the Last Thing You Ate" (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/29/well/live/what-to-blame-for-your-stomach-bug-not-always-the-last-thing-you-ate.html)

    June 29, 2017

  • Fun!

    June 29, 2017

  • Exactly--with his aviator glasses and bomber jacket (which he'd have picked up last winter in the "seasonal" section).

    June 28, 2017

  • Stellar list!

    June 28, 2017

  • Fantastic!

    June 27, 2017

  • Or paradelle?

    June 27, 2017

  • Nice one, qms.

    Also, I'm adding this to my hence list.

    June 27, 2017

  • Oh, fun!

    June 27, 2017

  • Alright!

    June 27, 2017

  • Compare zibet.

    June 27, 2017

  • I saw something about that, too--was it about one of the Great Lakes?

    June 26, 2017

  • See citation on pyrosome.

    June 23, 2017

  • "Each pyrosome is made up of individual zooids – small, multicellular organisms – linked together in a tunic to form a tube-like colony that is closed on one end. They are filter feeders and use cilia to draw plankton into their mucous filter."

    -- "Researchers probe explosion of pyrosomes off the Northwest Coast" (https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/news/features/pyrosomes/index.cfm)

    June 23, 2017

  • I haven't had enough coffee for a limerick, so I'll default to haiku:

    qms plants seeds

    and encourages us to

    cultivate our own.

    June 23, 2017

  • Why a cocktail? Wouldn't jam make more sense?

    June 22, 2017

  • Chimps and fruit bats are picky.

    When it comes to their lunch, it's sticky.

    Why eat cheese or meat?

    Choose fruits or a beet.

    (But maybe not a durian--they're icky.)

    June 22, 2017

  • I was thinking something more like the university from Rocky and Bullwinkle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSVq7X7OPeQ

    June 22, 2017

  • Arrived here after getting liftman as a random word. What a nice list!

    June 21, 2017

  • What's a matta?

    June 21, 2017

  • Your lists are lovely.

    June 21, 2017

  • ""|Hélène| Grimaud doesn't sound like most pianists: she is a rubato artist, a reinventor of phrasings, a taker of chances. "A wrong note that is played out of élan, you hear it differently than one that is played out of fear," she says.""

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=H%C3%A9l%C3%A8ne_Grimaud&oldid=778559561

    June 20, 2017

  • I've added it to my list.

    June 19, 2017

  • This is great!

    June 19, 2017

  • adagio

    June 19, 2017

  • "The pigment replaced the expensive lapis lazuli and was an important topic in the letters exchanged between Johann Leonhard Frisch and the president of the Royal Academy of Sciences, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, between 1708 and 1716."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Prussian_blue&oldid=785238123

    June 16, 2017

  • Would you consider adding bezoars to your list?

    June 15, 2017

  • "Marked with fine lines, as if scratched with a pen or painted with a fine brush; specifically, marked with a series of concentric lines, as every feather of the body-plumage of a dark brahma or a partridge cochin hen."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    June 15, 2017

  • Just got polari as a random word. Is someone trying to send me a message?

    June 15, 2017

  • I just read this in an article about Steve Casner's “Careful: A User’s Guide to Our Injury-Prone Minds,” (at http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/be-careful-your-mind-makes-accidents-inevitable):

    "To an extent, we are accident-prone because we are imaginative. We are determined to use familiar tools in novel ways—we might use a knife handle, say, to break up ice in the freezer, or a screwdriver to pry open a stuck drawer. The problem is that we imagine how things will go right but not how they will go wrong. In psychological terms, we perceive “affordances for action” (the blade of the screwdriver prying off the lid), but not “affordances for harm” (the blade breaking off, flying upward, and stabbing us in the eye). Casner worries that our optimism about our own plans might be an insurmountable part of our evolutionary heritage. Recalling the time he fell off a chair while trying to replace the batteries in his smoke detector—he should have used a ladder—Casner reflects that, in our primate past, it was the climbers who ate."

    June 14, 2017

  • From now on, I'll be saying ptero's name as pterodactickle.

    June 14, 2017

  • This is great, hh. Just arrived here after looking up buffalo nickel.

    June 14, 2017

  • The keeper of the raccoon's nook, of course, is the raccoonnookkeeper, which see.

    June 13, 2017

  • Also see Book Book.

    June 13, 2017

  • And if that grumpy hen has a raccoon keeping track of her finances from another quiet corner, that would be the Book Book chook cook's raccoon nook bookkeeper.

    June 13, 2017

  • "Your car is equipped not with a thermometer but with a thermistor. Thermistors work in a similar manner to thermometers, but rather than using a liquid like mercury, thermistors measure the change in electrical current as a result of heat added or taken away. Thermistors are quite convenient, since they are small, cheap to make and for the most part, accurate."

    -- from "This is why your car thermometer is almost always wrong" by Greg Porter, in the Washington Post (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2017/06/12/this-is-why-your-car-thermometer-is-almost-always-wrong/?utm_term=.3c6fc7bbdc39)

    June 13, 2017

  • Um, would you rather have some fufluns? I'm sure we could scare up a few around here somewhere.

    June 9, 2017

  • De-lightful!

    June 8, 2017

  • What--you don't think baby mice wine would go with the head cheese?

    June 8, 2017

  • Haha! I'm a sucker for anything stringy and mucilaginous.

    June 7, 2017

  • "n. A stringy, mucilaginous substance which forms in vinegar during the acetous fermentation, and the presence of which sets up and hastens this kind of fermentation. It is produced by a plant, Mycoderma aceti, the germs of which, like those of the yeast-plant, exist in the atmosphere."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    June 7, 2017

  • From the examples:

    "Mention of this substance is made in (Proverbs 25: 20) -- "and as vinegar upon nitre" -- and in (Jeremiah 2: 26) The article denoted is not that which we now understand by the term nitre i.e. nitrate of Potassa -- "saltpetre" -- but the nitrum of the Latins and the natron or native carbonate of soda of modern chemistry."

    Smith's Bible Dictionary

    June 7, 2017

  • "n. The fermented wort used by vinegar-makers."

    --from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    June 7, 2017

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "n. Must; specifically, a preparation used for “doctoring” wines of inferior quality: same as doctor, 6."

    June 7, 2017

  • "Four thieves vinegar (also called Marseilles vinegar, Marseilles remedy, prophylactic vinegar, vinegar of the four thieves, camphorated acetic acid, vinaigre des quatre voleurs and acetum quator furum) is a concoction of vinegar (either from red wine, white wine, cider, or distilled white) infused with herbs, spices or garlic that was believed to protect users from the plague. The recipe for this vinegar has almost as many variations as its legend."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Four_thieves_vinegar&oldid=748099207

    June 7, 2017

  • This list could be paired nicely with john's revolting-beverages.

    June 7, 2017

  • I'm glad this is an open list.

    June 6, 2017

  • Oh, you--with your mordant wit. Now I'm even more sure to add this to my mordants list.

    June 2, 2017

  • This seems right up biocon's alley.

    June 2, 2017

  • "The Holdrege series consists of very deep, well drained, moderately permeable soils formed in calcareous loess."

    -- https://soilseries.sc.egov.usda.gov/OSD_Docs/H/HOLDREGE.html

    May 26, 2017

  • Do we not have any lists of soils? I'm fond of the Holdrege series (for obvious reasons).

    May 26, 2017

  • Ah. Nice. I just added it to Prolagus's •-crappie-food list.

    May 26, 2017

  • Epic.

    May 24, 2017

  • Thanks, hh!

    May 24, 2017

  • See citation on side splash.

    May 23, 2017

  • See citation on side splash.

    May 23, 2017

  • "Justin believes that he experienced what’s called a side flash or side splash, in which the lightning ‘splashes’ from something that has been struck – such as a tree or telephone pole – hopscotching to a nearby object or person. Considered the second most common lightning hazard, side splashes inflict 20 to 30 per cent of injuries and fatalities."

    -- https://qz.com/989827/what-happens-to-people-who-are-struck-by-lightning/

    May 23, 2017

  • Oh, reverse dictionary. You're my favorite. (Just don't tell weirdnet.)

    Edit: (Or the Century.)

    May 23, 2017

  • Excellent.

    May 23, 2017

  • Thanks, bilby.

    May 23, 2017

  • My new favorite list! Thanks, kalayzich.

    May 23, 2017

  • I remember many happy childhood hours spent in my small town playing games such as "How Far Does This Crack In The Dirt Go?" or "Can We Knock Down That Icicle With A Snowball?"

    Kids these days don't know what they're missing.

    May 22, 2017

  • I just found oner.

    May 22, 2017

  • Just arrived here again after looking up conker. I still love this list!

    May 22, 2017

  • I had the same thought, seanahan.

    May 22, 2017

  • rectangled

    May 22, 2017

  • See comment on pittacal.

    May 22, 2017

  • "Pittacal was the first synthetic dyestuff to be produced commercially. It was accidentally discovered by German chemist Carl Ludwig Reichenbach in 1832, who was also the discoverer of kerosene, phenol, eupion, paraffin wax and creosote.

    As the history goes, Reichenbach applied creosote to the wooden posts of his home, in order to drive away dogs who urinated on them. The strategy was ineffectual, however, and he noted that the dog's urine reacted with creosote to form an intense dark blue deposit. He named the new substance píttacal (from Greek words tar and beautiful). He later was able to produce pure pittacal by treating beechwood tar with barium oxide and using alumina as a mordant to the dye's fabrics. Although sold commercially as a dyestuff, it did not fare well."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pittacal&oldid=534436190

    May 22, 2017

  • "In the 18th century airwood came to be used by marqueteurs; for most artificial colours they used holly, which takes vegetable dyes very well, but airwood was employed either in its natural off-white state or stained with iron sulphate to produce a range of silver and silver-grey hues. The reason that airwood was preferred to holly for this colour was that it gave a metallic sheen or lustre, while holly dyed by the same process turned a rather dead grey. The use of airwood in this way meant that by the 19th century it was associated specifically with that colour, and at the same time name gradually changed from airwood to harewood."

    -- From Wikipedia's harewood (material) page

    May 22, 2017

  • "Known since ancient times as copperas and as green vitriol, the blue-green heptahydrate is the most common form of this material."

    -- From Wikipedia's Iron(II) sulphate page

    May 22, 2017

  • See citation in comment on harewood.

    May 22, 2017

  • I also love that this list has proofread.

    May 19, 2017

  • Ooh! More excellent band names here.

    May 19, 2017

  • Someone just listed cattle egret on a different list. I clicked on it, made sure it was listed on my cattle list, then showed up over here--only to see my comment from 2012.

    Egrets, I have a few.

    May 19, 2017

  • open list is my middle name.

    May 19, 2017

  • I miss our-john.

    May 19, 2017

  • That's good to hear. I've been looking forward to reading it.

    May 19, 2017

  • So many potential band names here.

    May 19, 2017

  • Oh! Wordsmith? I get those e-mails, too--and I'm a huge fan of the Internet Anagram Server.

    May 19, 2017

  • Oh, fun! Nice list, tristero.

    May 18, 2017

  • schav!

    May 18, 2017

  • I adore sorrels.

    Don't we have some soup lists around here?

    May 18, 2017

  • How'd y'all feel about adding all y'all?

    May 18, 2017

  • Superb.

    May 18, 2017

  • Having just seen the citation on zombee, I'm left wondering whether the prongs should be called ant-lers.

    May 11, 2017

  • One of my favorite qualities about this site is that every potential list is an existing list--but I think it's also true that every list has potential.

    And this is a good one.

    May 10, 2017

  • *favorited*

    (I just got metel as a random word.)

    May 10, 2017

  • Nice! You might find some yoinkworthy entries over on of-arabic-origin.

    May 10, 2017

  • But most of the usage examples and tweets do seem to be typos about education.

    May 10, 2017

  • I have access to the online version of the Oxford English Dictionary, which lists usage examples going back to at least the 1600's. Here are some of the definitions:

    1. "Med. The excretion, expulsion, or removal of something from the body. Obs."

    3.a. "The action of bringing out or developing something from a state of latent, rudimentary, or potential existence; an instance or result of this."

    3.b. "Chem. The action of isolating a substance from a compound or mixture in which it is present; extraction. Now rare."

    4. "The inferring of a principle, conclusion, etc., from premises or available data. Also: a result of this, an inference; cf. educt n. 3." (Which has "That which is inferred or elicited from something; a product or result of inference or development.")

    5. "Mech a. The passage of steam, water, or vapour out of a vessel through a pipe or tube provided for the purpose; spec. (in a steam engine) the exit of steam from the cylinder after it has done its work in propelling the piston; cf. exhaust n. 1a(a) and the note there. Usu. attrib. (see Compounds). Now chiefly hist."

    6. "The bringing about or occasioning of an act, event, emotion, etc. Cf. educe v. 4."

    May 10, 2017

  • Fantastic list! I just arrived here after getting ilicic as a random word.

    May 9, 2017

  • Marvelous. I wish I knew more about Ludolf Bakhuizen.

    May 9, 2017

  • Likewise, qms.

    May 9, 2017

  • See citation on iodine.

    May 9, 2017

  • "Iodine is used in chemistry as an indicator for starch. When starch is mixed with iodine in solution, an intensely dark blue colour develops, representing a starch/iodine complex. Starch is a substance common to most plant cells and so a weak iodine solution will stain starch present in the cells. Iodine is one component in the staining technique known as Gram staining, used in microbiology. Lugol's solution or Lugol's iodine (IKI) is a brown solution that turns black in the presence of starches and can be used as a cell stain, making the cell nuclei more visible. Iodine is also used as a mordant in Gram's staining, it enhances dye to enter through the pore present in the cell wall/membrane."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Staining&oldid=776676067

    May 9, 2017

  • See citation on eosin.

    May 9, 2017

  • "Van Gogh was a fan of the vivid scarlet ‘geranium lake’ pigment derived from the synthetic dye, eosin. Even at the time it was known to fade. He compensated by using it more intensely, but was ultimately unable to hold back the photochemical tide."

    -- https://www.chemistryworld.com/feature/raiders-of-the-lost-pigments/3007237.article

    May 9, 2017

  • From Wikipedia:

    "The mouth of most sea urchins is made up of five calcium carbonate teeth or jaws, with a fleshy, tongue-like structure within. The entire chewing organ is known as Aristotle's lantern . . . , from Aristotle's description in his History of Animals:

    ...the urchin has what we mainly call its head and mouth down below, and a place for the issue of the residuum up above. The urchin has, also, five hollow teeth inside, and in the middle of these teeth a fleshy substance serving the office of a tongue. Next to this comes the esophagus, and then the stomach, divided into five parts, and filled with excretion, all the five parts uniting at the anal vent, where the shell is perforated for an outlet... In reality the mouth-apparatus of the urchin is continuous from one end to the other, but to outward appearance it is not so, but looks like a horn lantern with the panes of horn left out. (Tr. D'Arcy Thompson)

    However, this has recently been proven to be a mistranslation. Aristotle's lantern is actually referring to the whole shape of sea urchins, which look like the ancient lamps of Aristotle's time."

    (https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Sea_urchin&oldid=776559759)

    May 9, 2017

  • Fantastic, qms.

    May 9, 2017

  • Perfection.

    May 9, 2017

  • "Structural coloration is the production of colour by microscopically structured surfaces fine enough to interfere with visible light, sometimes in combination with pigments. For example, peacock tail feathers are pigmented brown, but their microscopic structure makes them also reflect blue, turquoise, and green light, and they are often iridescent."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Structural_coloration&oldid=776840981

    May 8, 2017

  • "Pollia condensata, colloquially called the marble berry, is a perennial herbaceous plant with stoloniferous stems and shiny, metallic blue, hard, dry, round fruit. It is found in forested regions of Africa. The glossy blue of the berry-like fruit, created by structural coloration, is the most intense of any known biological material."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pollia_condensata&oldid=769696583

    May 8, 2017

  • See citation on water hammer.

    May 8, 2017

  • See citation on water hammer.

    May 8, 2017

  • "Water hammer (or, more generally, fluid hammer) is a pressure surge or wave caused when a fluid (usually a liquid but sometimes also a gas) in motion is forced to stop or change direction suddenly (momentum change). A water hammer commonly occurs when a valve closes suddenly at an end of a pipeline system, and a pressure wave propagates in the pipe. It is also called hydraulic shock."

    -- https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_hammer

    May 8, 2017

  • Oh, cruel bilby! I just went to see whether that's an actual list--but it's not. I hereby nominate you to create it.

    May 6, 2017

  • For its use in old chemistry, see flower.

    May 5, 2017

  • "plural In chem., fine particles of a substance, especially when raised by fire in sublimation, and adhering to the heads of vessels in the form of a powder or mealy deposit: as, the flowers of sulphur."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    May 5, 2017

  • From the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English:

    "A solution of a medicinal substance in water; -- distinguished from tincture and aqua."

    May 4, 2017

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "A vagabond who sleeps in straw; hence, one who lives alow, knavish life; a dissolute fellow."

    May 4, 2017

  • I just got silk-winder as a random word.

    May 4, 2017

  • I'm sure there's a way. There are a couple of us wordnik folk over there--I even share curatorship of some boards (including one that's just plinths).

    May 4, 2017

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "A logical term considered as capable of being universally predicated of another; usually, one of the five words, or five kinds of predicates, according to the Aristotelian logic, namely genus, species, difference, property, and accident."

    May 3, 2017

  • See citation in comment on hylomorphism.

    May 3, 2017

  • "Hylomorphism (or hylemorphism) is a philosophical theory developed by Aristotle, which conceives being (ousia) as a compound of matter and form.

    The word is a 19th-century term formed from the Greek words ὕλη hyle, "wood, matter" and μορφή, morphē, "form.""

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hylomorphism&oldid=775386104

    May 3, 2017

  • I'm still combing through the archives (as it were) and finding such gems. Long live wordie/nik!

    May 3, 2017

  • Just arrived here after getting phylogeography as a random word. What a fun list! Thanks, mollusque.

    May 3, 2017

  • See passerine.

    May 3, 2017

  • Thanks, vm. I was working on fairy-tales, too. (I'd thought about cross-referencing them with tags, etc., but haven't gotten there yet.)

    May 2, 2017

  • From Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License:

    "n. someone who explores potholes as a hobby"

    May 1, 2017

  • I arrived here again after catching vent-peg as a random word. I adore this list.

    May 1, 2017

  • Nice, vm. I had started a list of a few of these... see aarne-thompson-classification-system-for-folktales.

    May 1, 2017

  • That's fantastic, alexz. I've been amused by how all of this stuff seems to be related--alchemy, chemistry, cooking, pharmacy, &c., but now I'm reminded of an old joke: What do you get for the person who has everything? Penicillin.

    May 1, 2017

  • These are great!

    April 27, 2017

  • In the meantime, would you like to snack on a carrot? I've also got some olives.

    April 27, 2017

  • Hold on--I just went to the store for gum Arabic, but now I've realized I'm all out of spikenard.

    April 27, 2017

  • See comments on confectio damocritis and confectio Damocritis.

    April 27, 2017

  • "Bolus of Mendes (Greek: Βῶλος Bolos; fl. 3rd century BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, a neo-Pythagorean writer of works of esoterica and medical works, who worked in Ptolemaic Egypt. The Suda, and Eudocia after him, mention a Pythagorean philosopher of Mendes in Egypt, who wrote on marvels, potent remedies, and astronomical phenomena. The Suda, however, also describes a Bolus who was a philosopher of the school of Democritus, who wrote Inquiry, and Medical Art, containing "natural medical remedies from some resources of nature." But, from a passage of Columella, it appears that Bolos of Mendes and the follower of Democritus were one and the same person; and he seems to have lived following the time of Theophrastus, whose work On Plants he appears to have known."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bolus_of_Mendes&oldid=754867544

    April 26, 2017

  • Or Bolus of Mendes.

    *starts muttering again*

    April 26, 2017

  • "Pseudo-Democritus was an unidentified Greek philosopher writing on chemical and alchemical subjects under the pen name "Democritus," probably around 60 AD. He was the second most respected writer on alchemy (after Hermes Trismegistus)."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pseudo-Democritus&oldid=665210781

    April 26, 2017

  • Oh! I wonder whether Damocritis is actually Pseudo-Democritus.

    April 26, 2017

  • The crista-galli part is fun.

    April 26, 2017

  • "Diogenes Laërtius gives two different accounts of his death. In the first account, Chrysippus was seized with dizziness having drunk undiluted wine at a feast, and died soon after. In the second account, he was watching a donkey eat some figs and cried out: "Now give the donkey a drink of pure wine to wash down the figs", whereupon he died in a fit of laughter."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Chrysippus&oldid=776089952

    April 26, 2017

  • According to Wikipedia, ekpyrosis is "a Stoic belief in the periodic destruction of the cosmos by a great conflagration every Great Year. The cosmos is then recreated (palingenesis) only to be destroyed again at the end of the new cycle. This form of catastrophe is the opposite of kataklysmos (κατακλυσμός, "inundation"), the destruction of the earth by water," and "the concept of ekpyrosis is attributed to Chrysippus by Plutarch." (See https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ekpyrosis&oldid=765510670.)

    April 26, 2017

  • "The Latvian Gambit or Greco Counter Gambit is a chess opening characterised by the moves:

    1. e4 e5

    2. Nf3 f5?!"

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Latvian_Gambit&oldid=707357277

    April 25, 2017

  • There's always the Latvian Gambit.

    April 25, 2017

  • Compare gravity.

    April 25, 2017

  • "In acoustics, the state of being low in pitch: opposed to acuteness."

    -- from the Century Dictionary

    April 25, 2017

  • How clever!

    April 24, 2017

  • I just added lacuna.

    April 24, 2017

  • Snake-flower (a poem by The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia):

    n. The viper's-bugloss, Echium vulgare.

    n. The greater stitch wort, Alsine Holostea.

    n. The white dead-nettle, Lamium album.

    n. The white campion, Lychnis alba.

    n. The star-flower or American chickweed-wintergreen, Trientalis Americana.

    April 21, 2017

  • Also see sand-box.

    April 20, 2017

  • See sandbox.

    April 20, 2017

  • *favorited*

    April 20, 2017

  • Mount Doom?

    April 19, 2017

  • I like your lists. :-)

    April 19, 2017

  • "Bald’s eyesalve contains wine, garlic, an Allium species (such as leek or onion) and oxgall. The recipe states that, after the ingredients have been mixed together, they must stand in a brass vessel for nine nights before use."

    -- https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/getting-medieval-on-bacteria-ancient-books-may-point-to-new-antibiotics/

    April 19, 2017

  • "In 2015, our team published a pilot study on a 1,000-year old recipe called Bald’s eyesalve from “Bald’s Leechbook,” an Old English medical text. The eyesalve was to be used against a “wen,” which may be translated as a sty, or an infection of the eyelash follicle."

    -- https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/getting-medieval-on-bacteria-ancient-books-may-point-to-new-antibiotics/

    April 19, 2017

  • See anemone or sea anemone.

    April 18, 2017

  • Ha!

    April 18, 2017

  • See mockumentary.

    April 18, 2017

  • "“It’s sort of the unicorn of mollusks,” Margo Haygood, a marine microbiologist at the University of Utah, told The Washington Post.""

    -- https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2017/04/17/scientists-find-giant-elusive-clam-known-as-the-unicorn-of-mollusks

    April 18, 2017

  • Nice list!

    April 17, 2017

  • Oh, funny! You should add it to the words-ending-with--gator list.

    April 17, 2017

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