Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A tincture, rarely employed, which is considered as an orange color or bright brown. It is represented by diagonal lines from sinister to dexter, crossed by vertical lines.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In heraldry, a tincture spoken of as orange-brown, or as produced by mixing red and yellow.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • This is one of those passages for which the editor of that review has merited an abatement in heraldry, no such writing ever having been written; and indeed, by other like assertions of equal veracity, the gentleman has richly entitled himself to bear a gore sinister tenne in his escutcheon.

    Historical Documentation Concerning the Radical Piracy of _Wat Tyler_

  • I make no doubt (my deare friend Reniero) but the night is indifferent colde, and yet somewhat the warmer by the Snowes falling: and I have heard that such weather as this, is tenne-times more extreame at Paris, then heere in our warmer Countrey.

    The Decameron

  • Well Belcolove, seeing you dare not credit my bringing the tenne Florines, according to my promised day: I will leave you a good pawne, my very best Cloake, lyned quite thorough with rich Silke, and made up in the choysest manner.

    The Decameron

  • Cacavinciglia, on whom I bestowed my intirest affection, and (by the best Urinall that ever I gazed on) would have given her tenne faire Bologninaes, to yeeld the matter I moved to her, which yet I could not (by any meanes) compasse.

    The Decameron

  • The next morning following, the breake of day, Ferando recovered his senses, and thorow divers chinkes and crannies of the Tombe, descried daylight, which hee had not see in tenne moneths space before.

    The Decameron

  • It is not many yeares since (worthy assembly) that in Bulloigne there dwelt a learned Physitian, a man famous for skill, and farre renowned, whose name was Master Albert, and being growne aged, to the estimate of threescore and tenne yeares: hee had yet such a sprightly disposition, that though naturall heate and vigour had quite shaken hands with him, yet amorous flames and desires had not wholly forsaken him.

    The Decameron

  • Pyrates of Monago, and put to the ransome of tenne thousand

    The Decameron

  • Country house of his, standing about tenne miles distant thence.

    The Decameron

  • Thei caried vpon their foreheades, and on their lefte armes pretie billettes of Paper, facioned for the place, wherein ware written the tenne preceptes of the two Tables.

    The Fardle of Facions, conteining the aunciente maners, customes and lawes, of the peoples enhabiting the two partes of the earth, called Affricke and Asie

  • And among the Grekes: Capiteines, or heades ouer a thousands, ouer an hundred, ouer fiuetie, ouer tenne, and ouer fiue.

    The Fardle of Facions, conteining the aunciente maners, customes and lawes, of the peoples enhabiting the two partes of the earth, called Affricke and Asie

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