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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Their office is to fortifie the campe, and to assaulte cities.

    The Fardle of Facions, conteining the aunciente maners, customes and lawes, of the peoples enhabiting the two partes of the earth, called Affricke and Asie

  • Neyther did it refuse or make resistance to anye sharpe and newe assaulte of loue, which in my stroken and sore wounded heart woulde lye festering and feeding of himselfe.

    Hypnerotomachia The Strife of Loue in a Dreame

  • Assuming it's the new plate, it's back to the old colors of navy and orange, i.e., bottom 2/3 is navy with a small embossed outline of the state, and top 1/3 is orange. im going to go ballistic of my visual senses keep continuing to be assaulte by gross pasty, hairy, untoned man legs! enough with the faggy tight short shorts already, that shi+ aint right!!!!

    Brownstoner

  • That if they assaulte Uncass, the English are engaged to assist him.

    Bradford's History of 'Plimoth Plantation' From the Original Manuscript. With a Report of the Proceedings Incident to the Return of the Manuscript to Massachusetts

  • I once did saue thy life, when else by cruell riottous assaulte thou hadst bin torne in pieces: thou art reseru'de, to be my Sumner to yond spirituall Courte.

    Sir Thomas More

  • Consul, against the Cimbrians, made his horsemen manie daies continually to assaulte the enemies, and considered how thei issued out of their campe for to folow them: wherfore he sette an ambusshe behinde the Campe of the Cimbrians, and made them to be assaulted of his horsmen, and the

    Machiavelli, Volume I

  • Of the Lacedemonians, accordyng as Tucidido affirmeth, in their armies were used Flutes: for that thei judged, that this armonie, was moste mete to make their armie to procede with gravetie, and with furie: the Carthaginens beyng moved by this verie same reason, in the first assaulte, used the violone.

    Machiavelli, Volume I

  • The custome and the qualitie of the enemie ought to be considered, and whether that he wil assaulte thee either in the mornyng, or at none or in the evenynge, and whether he be more puisante with fotemen or horsemen, and accordyng as thou understandest, to ordeine and to provide for thy self.

    Machiavelli, Volume I

  • And above all thynges it ought to be provided, that the armie knowe not to what businesse he leadeth them: for that there is nothyng in the warre more profitable, then to keepe secret the thynges that is to be dooen: and to thintente a suddeine assaulte dooe not trouble thy soldiours, thou oughteste to see them to stande reddie with their weapons, because the thynges that ar provided for, offend lesse.

    Machiavelli, Volume I

  • And also how with the verie same order of lxxx. rankes, by chaungyng onely to the hinder parte the five rankes of Pikes which were the formost of everie Centurie, thei maye likewise in bringyng them in battaile raie, come to bee placed behinde: whiche may be doen, when in marchyng, the enemies should come to assaulte them at their backes: accordynge as the orderyng therof is before declared.

    Machiavelli, Volume I

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