Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of impetrating, or obtaining by petition or entreaty.
  • n. The obtaining of benefice from Rome by solicitation, which benefice belonged to the disposal of the king or other lay patron of the realm.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of impetrating, or obtaining by petition or entreaty.
  • n. The obtaining of benefice from Rome by solicitation, which benefice belonged to the disposal of the king or other lay patron of the realm.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of impetrating or obtaining by prayer or petition; procurement; specifically, in old English statutes, the procurement from the court of Rome of benefices and church offices in England which by law belonged to the disposition of the king and other lay patrons.

Etymologies

Latin impetratio: compare French impétration. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • A general impetration is asserted by some and denied by others, but none pretend to a general application of Christ's death for the salvation of all.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume VI (Acts to Revelation)

  • So chap.v. 18, “By the righteousness of one” (that is, his impetration), “the free gift came upon all men unto justification of life,” in the application.

    The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

  • Of this, much I shall not speak, having considered the thing itself under the notion of impetration already; only, I shall add some few observations proper to that particular of the controversy which we have in hand.

    The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

  • So that this may be rested on, as I conceive, as firm and immovable, that the impetration of good things by Christ, and the application of them, respect the same individual persons.

    The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

  • The sum of all comes to this, and the weight of all lies upon that distinction which we before recounted; — namely, that in respect of impetration, Christ obtained redemption and reconciliation for all; in respect of application, it is bestowed only on them who do believe and continue therein.

    The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

  • And here comes their distinction of impetration and application, which we before intimated; and thereabout, in the explication of this assertion, they are wondrously divided.

    The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

  • Of the distinction of impetration and application — The use and abuse thereof; with the opinion of the adversaries upon the whole matter in controversy unfolded; and the question on both sides stated.

    The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

  • Periepoiēsato, “Purchased with his own blood;” purchase and impetration, merit and acquisition, being in this business terms equivalent; which latter word is used in divers other places, as 1 Thess.v. 9; Eph. i.

    The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

  • So that, notwithstanding this exception and new distinction, our assertion stands firm, — That the fruits of the death of Christ, in respect of impetration of good and application to us, ought not to be divided; and our arguments to confirm it are unshaken.

    The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

  • First, This place treateth not of the ransom of Christ in respect of impetration, but of application; for it affirms Christ to be that by his death which he is only by faith, as was manifested from Rom. iii.

    The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

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