Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One bound by legal agreement to work for another for a specific amount of time in return for instruction in a trade, art, or business.
  • n. One who is learning a trade or occupation, especially as a member of a labor union.
  • n. A beginner; a learner.
  • transitive v. To place or take on as a beginner or learner.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A trainee, especially in a skilled trade.
  • n. One who is bound by indentures or by legal agreement to serve a tradesperson, or other person, for a certain time, with a view to learn the art, or trade, in which his master is bound to instruct him.
  • n. One not well versed in a subject; a tyro or newbie.
  • v. To put under the care and supervision of a master, for the purpose of instruction in a trade or business.
  • v. To be an apprentice to.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who is bound by indentures or by legal agreement to serve a mechanic, or other person, for a certain time, with a view to learn the art, or trade, in which his master is bound to instruct him.
  • n. One not well versed in a subject; a tyro.
  • n. A barrister, considered a learner of law till of sixteen years' standing, when he might be called to the rank of serjeant.
  • transitive v. To bind to, or put under the care of, a master, for the purpose of instruction in a trade or business.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To bind to or put under the care of a master, for the purpose of instruction in some art, trade, or profession; indenture.
  • n. One who is bound by indenture to serve some particular individual or company for a specified time, in order to learn some art, trade, profession, manufacture, etc., in which his master or masters become bound to instruct him.
  • n. A learner in any department; one only slightly versed in a subject; a novice.
  • n. In old English law, a barrister of less than sixteen years' standing. After this period he might be called to the rank of serjeant.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. works for an expert to learn a trade
  • v. be or work as an apprentice

Etymologies

Middle English apprentis, from Old French aprentis, from Vulgar Latin *apprēnditīcius, from *apprēnditus, alteration of Latin apprehēnsus, past participle of apprehendere, to seize; see apprehend.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old French aprentis, plural of aprentif, from the verb aprendre, Late Latin apprendō, from Classical Latin apprehendō. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The term apprentice makes me think back to early art days when a "master" would have a whole school of apprentices behind him, often doing his work.

    Master and Apprentice - SLOG

  • In many of these stories, the apprentice is a sorcerer's apprentice.

    Can a bold-talking one-eyed fat man be a hero-king?

  • That being said, there is a uptick in the amount of restaurants we plan to build, we'll require a lot of new leadership and as the number of restaurateurs increase and as some of our restaurateurs are becoming what we call apprentice team leaders which allows them to oversee a lot more restaurants, we feel better and better that the leadership will be such as to be ready and be able to run great restaurants when the economic situation changes and we're able to find even more real estate sites.

    Chipotle Mexican Grill CEO Discusses Q3 2010 Results - Earnings Call Transcript -- Seeking Alpha

  • One of the greatest opportunities for the out-of-school unemployed youth and even many older unemployed workers, however, will always be found in apprentice programs.

    Leo Hindery, Jr.: Out of School, Out of Work, Out of Luck: The Youth Jobs Crisis

  • From the standpoint of right wing self-interest, narrowly construed, filling a liberal seat with an apprentice is not a bad outcome.

    Stromata Blog:

  • The apprentice is always young, usually a young teen and very often a child.

    Lance Mannion:

  • She --- and now it's just as accurate to use feminine pronouns, because the apprentice is quite regularly a girl, because she: --- doesn't have to be a knight in training or the heir of a hero-king or queen.

    Can a bold-talking one-eyed fat man be a hero-king?

  • The ascending dragon also unites with a new apprentice to be trained in the dragon magic, and as this boy steps up to his new life, the prior apprentice is promoted to Dragoneye and into his full power.

    Excerpt: Eon by Alison Goodman

  • We recently received an email from Corey W. Crawford, a graduate of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture, who is busy bringing the Taliesin apprentice "shelter lifestyle" to Dallas, Texas via his Personal Outdoor Dwelling System.

    December 2007

  • Now I sit and watch the humble term apprentice being elevated to near the top of the corporate ladder, with a salary that matches a king's ransom!

    MAIL CALL & CORRECTION

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