Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To move to a higher position; elevate: raised the loads with a crane. See Synonyms at lift.
  • transitive v. To set in an upright or erect position: raise a flagpole.
  • transitive v. To erect or build: raise a new building.
  • transitive v. To cause to arise, appear, or exist: The slap raised a welt.
  • transitive v. To increase in size, quantity, or worth: raise an employee's salary.
  • transitive v. To increase in intensity, degree, strength, or pitch: raised his voice.
  • transitive v. To improve in rank or dignity; promote: raised her to management level.
  • transitive v. To grow, especially in quantity; cultivate: raise corn and soybeans.
  • transitive v. To breed and care for to maturity: raise cattle.
  • transitive v. To bring up; rear: raise children.
  • transitive v. To accustom to something from an early age: "Such amenities are ... meant to make churchgoing attractive to a post-World War II generation raised on shopping malls and multiplex cinemas” ( Gustav Niebuhr).
  • transitive v. To put forward for consideration: raised an important question. See Synonyms at broach1.
  • transitive v. To voice; utter: raise a shout.
  • transitive v. To awaken; arouse: noise that would raise the dead.
  • transitive v. To stir up; instigate: raise a revolt.
  • transitive v. To bring about; provoke: remarks intended to raise a laugh.
  • transitive v. To make contact with by radio: couldn't raise the control tower after midnight.
  • transitive v. To gather together; collect: raise money from the neighbors for a charity.
  • transitive v. To cause (dough) to puff up.
  • transitive v. To end (a siege) by withdrawing troops or forcing the enemy troops to withdraw.
  • transitive v. To remove or withdraw (an order).
  • transitive v. Games To increase (a poker bet).
  • transitive v. Games To bet more than (a preceding bettor in poker).
  • transitive v. Games To increase the bid of (one's bridge partner).
  • transitive v. Nautical To bring into sight by approaching nearer: raised the Cape.
  • transitive v. To alter and increase fraudulently the written value of (a check, for example).
  • transitive v. To cough up (phlegm).
  • transitive v. Scots To make angry; enrage.
  • intransitive v. Games To increase a poker bet or a bridge bid.
  • n. The act of raising or increasing.
  • n. An increase in salary.
  • idiom Cain To behave in a rowdy or disruptive fashion.
  • idiom Cain To reprimand someone angrily.
  • idiom raise eyebrows To cause surprise or mild disapproval.
  • idiom raise the stakes To increase one's commitment or involvement.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To cause to physically rise.
  • v. To collect.
  • v. To bring up; to grow.
  • v. To cause something to come to the surface of the sea.
  • v. to increase something
  • v. To mention (a question, issue) for discussion
  • v. To respond to a bet by increasing the amount required to continue in the hand.
  • v. To create; to constitute (a use, or a beneficial interest in property).
  • v. To exponentiate, to involute.
  • v. To extract (a subject or other verb argument) out of an inner clause.
  • v. To cause (a dead person) to live again, to cause to be undead.
  • n. An increase in wages or salary; a rise (UK).
  • n. A shoulder exercise in which the arms are elevated against resistance.
  • n. A shot in which the delivered stone bumps another stone forward.
  • n. A bet which increased the previous bet.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To cause to rise; to bring from a lower to a higher place; to lift upward; to elevate; to heave.
  • transitive v. To bring to a higher condition or situation; to elevate in rank, dignity, and the like; to increase the value or estimation of; to promote; to exalt; to advance; to enhance.
  • transitive v. To increase the strength, vigor, or vehemence of; to excite; to intensify; to invigorate; to heighten.
  • transitive v. To elevate in degree according to some scale.
  • transitive v. To cause to rise up, or assume an erect position or posture; to set up; to make upright.
  • transitive v. To cause to spring up from a recumbent position, from a state of quiet, or the like; to awaken; to arouse.
  • transitive v. To rouse to action; to stir up; to incite to tumult, struggle, or war; to excite.
  • transitive v. To bring up from the lower world; to call up, as a spirit from the world of spirits; to recall from death; to give life to.
  • transitive v. To cause to arise, grow up, or come into being or to appear; to give rise to; to originate, produce, cause, effect, or the like.
  • transitive v. To form by the accumulation of materials or constituent parts; to build up; to erect.
  • transitive v. To bring together; to collect; to levy; to get together or obtain for use or service.
  • transitive v. To cause to grow; to procure to be produced, bred, or propagated; to grow.
  • transitive v. To bring into being; to produce; to cause to arise, come forth, or appear; -- often with up.
  • transitive v. To give rise to; to set agoing; to occasion; to start; to originate.
  • transitive v. To give vent or utterance to; to utter; to strike up.
  • transitive v. To bring to notice; to submit for consideration.
  • transitive v. To cause to rise, as by the effect of leaven; to make light and spongy, as bread.
  • transitive v.
  • transitive v. To cause (the land or any other object) to seem higher by drawing nearer to it.
  • transitive v. To let go.
  • transitive v. To create or constitute.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To lift or bring up bodily in space; move to a higher place; carry or cause to be carried upward or aloft; hoist: as, to raise one's hand or head; to raise ore from a mine; to raise a flag to the masthead.
  • To make upright or erect; cause to stand by lifting; elevate on a base or support; stand or set up: as, to raise a mast or pole; to raise the frame of a building; to raise a fallen man.
  • To elevate in position or upward reach; increase the height of; build up, fill, or embank; make higher: as, to raise a building by adding a garret or loft; to raise the bed of a road; the flood raised the river above its banks.
  • To make higher or more elevated in state, condition, estimation, amount, or degree; cause to rise in grade, rank, or value; heighten, exalt, advance, enhance, increase, or intensify: as, to raise a man to higher office; to raise one's reputation; to raise the temperature; to raise prices; to raise the tariff.
  • To estimate as of importance; cry up; hence, to applaud; extol.
  • To form as a piled-up mass, or by upward accretion; erect above a base or foundation; build or heap up: as, to raise a cathedral, a monument, or a mound; an island in the sea. raised by volcanic action.
  • To lift off or away; remove by or as if by lifting: take off, as something put on or imposed: as, to raise a blockade.
  • To cause to rise in sound; lift up the voice in; especially, to utter in high or loud tones.
  • They both, as with one accord, raised a dismal cry.
  • To cause to rise in air or water; cause to move in an upward direction: as, to raise a kite; to raise a wreck.
  • To cause to rise from an inert or lifeless condition; specifically, to cause to rise from death or the grave; reanimate: as, to raise the dead.
  • To cause to rise above the visible horizon, or to the level of observation; bring into view; sight, as by approach: chiefly a nautical use: as, to raise the land by sailing toward it.
  • To cause to rise by expansion or swelling; expand the mass of; puff up; inflate: as, to raise bread with yeast.
  • To cause to rise into being or manifestation; cause to be or to appear; call forth; evoke: as, to raise a riot; to raise a ghost.
  • To promote with care the growth and development of; bring up; rear; grow; breed: as, to raise a family of children (a colloquial use); to raise crops, plants, or cattle.
  • To cause a rising of, as into movement or activity; incite to agitation or commotion; rouse; stir up: as, the wind raised the sea; to raise the populace in insurrection; to raise a covey of partridges.
  • To cause to arise or come forth as a mass or multitude; draw or bring together; gather; collect; muster: as, to raise a company or an army; to raise an expedition.
  • To take up by aggregation or collection; procure an amount or a supply of; bring together for use or possession: as, to raise funds for an enterprise; to raise money on a note; to raise revenue.
  • To give rise to, or cause or occasion for; bring into force or operation; originate; start: as, to raise a laugh; to raise an expectation or a hope; to raise an outcry.
  • To hold up to view or observation; bring forward for consideration or discussion; exhibit; set forth: as, to raise a question or a point of order.
  • To rouse; excite; inflame.
  • To incite in thought; cause to come or proceed; bring, lead, or drive, as to a conclusion, a point of view, or an extremity.
  • In the arts, to shape in relief, as metal which is hammered, punched, or spun from a thin plate in raised forms. See spin, repoussé.
  • Embroidery by means of which a nap or pile like that of velvet is produced, the pattern being worked in looped stitches and thus raised in relief from the background.
  • Mosaic of small tesseræ, in which the principal surface is modeled ill relief, as in stucco or plaster, the tesseræ being afterward applied to this surface and following its curves: a variety of the art practised under the Roman empire, but not common since.
  • To obtain ready money by some shift or other.
  • Synonyms and Raise, Lift, Erect, Elevate, Exalt, Heighten, Heave, Hoist. Raise is the most general and the most freely figurative of these words, and in its various uses represents all the rest, and also many others, as shown in the definitions. Lift is peculiar in implying the exercise of physical or mechanical force, moving the object generally a comparatively short distance upward, but breaking completely its physical contact with the place where it was. To lift a ladder is to take it wholly off the ground, if only an inch; to raise a ladder, we may lift one end and carry it up till it is supported in some way. To lift one's head or arm is a more definite and energetic act than to raise it. We lift a child over a place; we raise one that has fallen. To erect is to set up perpendicularly: as, to erect a flagstaff. To elevate is to raise relatively, generally by an amount not large; the word is often no more than a dignified synonym for raise. To exalt is to raise to dignity; the word is thus used in a physical sense in Isa. xl. 4, “Every valley shall be exalted,” and elsewhere in the Bible; but the figurative or moral sense has now become the principal one, so that the other seems antique. To heighten is to increase in height, either physically or morally: he whom we esteem already is heightened in our esteem by an especially honorable act. To heave is to raise slowly and with effort, and sometimes to throw in like fashion. To hoist is to raise a thing of some weight with some degree of slowness or effort, generally with mechanical help, to a place: as, to hoist a rock, or a flag.—14. Rear, Bring up, Raise. To rear offspring through their tenderer years till they can take care of themselves; to bring up a child in the way he should go; to raise oats and other products of the soil; to raise horses and cattle. Where were you brought up? not, where were you raised? The use of raise in application to persons is a vulgarism. Rear applies only to physical care; bring up applies more to training or education in mind and manners.
  • To bring up phlegm, bile, or blood from the throat, lungs, or stomach.
  • In poker, to increase (the amount bet by any preceding player).
  • n. Something raised, elevated, or built up; an ascent; a rise; a pile; a cairn.
  • n. A raising or lifting; removal by lifting or taking away, as of obstructions.
  • n. A raising or enlarging in amount; an increase or advance: as, a raise of wages; a raise of the stakes in gaming.
  • n. An acquisition; a getting or procuring by special effort, as of money or chattels: as, to make a raise of a hundred dollars.
  • n. A dialectal (Scotch) preterit of rise.
  • n. In mining, a rise; a riser; an opening at the back of a level to connect it to the level above.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. raise in rank or condition
  • v. cause to become alive again
  • n. the amount a salary is increased
  • v. put an end to
  • v. bid (one's partner's suit) at a higher level
  • v. bring up
  • v. cultivate by growing, often involving improvements by means of agricultural techniques
  • n. increasing the size of a bet (as in poker)
  • v. invigorate or heighten
  • v. multiply (a number) by itself a specified number of times: 8 is 2 raised to the power 3
  • v. raise from a lower to a higher position
  • v. cause to be heard or known; express or utter
  • v. bring (a surface or a design) into relief and cause to project
  • v. create a disturbance, especially by making a great noise
  • v. put forward for consideration or discussion
  • v. summon into action or bring into existence, often as if by magic
  • v. cause to puff up with a leaven
  • v. pronounce (vowels) by bringing the tongue closer to the roof of the mouth
  • v. cause to assemble or enlist in the military
  • v. collect funds for a specific purpose
  • n. an upward slope or grade (as in a road)
  • v. raise the level or amount of something
  • v. bet more than the previous player
  • n. the act of raising something
  • v. give a promotion to or assign to a higher position
  • v. construct, build, or erect
  • v. call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses)
  • v. increase
  • v. establish radio communications with
  • v. activate or stir up
  • v. move upwards

Etymologies

Middle English raisen, from Old Norse reisa.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English raisen, reisen, from Old Norse reisa ("to raise"), from Proto-Germanic *raisijanan, *raizijanan (“to raise”), causative form of Proto-Germanic *rīsanan (“to rise”), from Proto-Indo-European *rei- (“to rise, arise”). Cognate with Old English rāsian ("to explore, examine, research"), Old English rīsan ("to seize, carry off"), Old English rǣran ("to cause to rise, raise, rear, build, create"). More at rear. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.