Definitions

from The American HeritageĀ® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To change (something) into another form, substance, state, or product; transform: convert water into ice.
  • transitive v. To change (something) from one use, function, or purpose to another; adapt to a new or different purpose: convert a forest into farmland.
  • transitive v. To persuade or induce to adopt a particular religion, faith, or belief: convert pagans to Christianity; was converted to pacifism by the war.
  • transitive v. To exchange for something of equal value: convert assets into cash.
  • transitive v. To exchange (a security, for example) by substituting an equivalent of another form.
  • transitive v. To express (a quantity) in alternative units: converting feet into meters.
  • transitive v. Logic To transform (a proposition) by conversion.
  • transitive v. Law To appropriate (another's property) without right to one's own use.
  • transitive v. Law To change (property) from real to personal or from joint to separate or vice versa.
  • transitive v. Sports To complete (a conversion, penalty shot, or free throw) successfully.
  • transitive v. Sports To score (a spare) in bowling.
  • intransitive v. To undergo a conversion: We converted to Islam several years ago.
  • intransitive v. To be converted: a sofa that converts into a bed; arms factories converting to peacetime production.
  • intransitive v. Football To make a conversion.
  • intransitive v. Sports To shoot and score a goal, especially immediately after receiving a pass or gaining control of a rebound.
  • n. One who has been converted, especially from one religion or belief to another.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A person who has converted his or her religion.
  • n. A person who is now in favour of something that he or she previously opposed or disliked.
  • v. To transform or change (something) into another form, substance, state, or product.
  • v. To change (something) from one use, function, or purpose to another.
  • v. To induce (someone) to adopt a particular religion, faith, ideology or belief.
  • v. To exchange for something of equal value.
  • v. To express (a quantity) in alternative units.
  • v. To express (a unit of measure) in terms of another; to furnish a mathematical formula by which a quantity, expressed in the former unit, may be given in the latter.
  • v. To appropriate wrongfully or unlawfully; to commit the common law tort of conversion.
  • v. To score extra points after (a try) by completing a conversion.
  • v. To score (a penalty)
  • v. To score a spare.
  • v. To undergo a conversion of religion, faith or belief.
  • v. To become converted.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A person who is converted from one opinion or practice to another; a person who is won over to, or heartily embraces, a creed, religious system, or party, in which he has not previously believed; especially, one who turns from the controlling power of sin to that of holiness, or from unbelief to Christianity.
  • n. A lay friar or brother, permitted to enter a monastery for the service of the house, but without orders, and not allowed to sing in the choir.
  • intransitive v. To be turned or changed in character or direction; to undergo a change, physically or morally.
  • transitive v. To cause to turn; to turn.
  • transitive v. To change or turn from one state or condition to another; to alter in form, substance, or quality; to transform; to transmute.
  • transitive v. To change or turn from one belief or course to another, as from one religion to another or from one party or sect to another.
  • transitive v. To produce the spiritual change called conversion in (any one); to turn from a bad life to a good one; to change the heart and moral character of (any one) from the controlling power of sin to that of holiness.
  • transitive v. To apply to any use by a diversion from the proper or intended use; to appropriate dishonestly or illegally.
  • transitive v. To exchange for some specified equivalent.
  • transitive v. To change (one proposition) into another, so that what was the subject of the first becomes the predicate of the second.
  • transitive v. To turn into another language; to translate.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To cause to turn; turn; turn round.
  • To change or turn, as into another form or substance or, by exchange, into an equivalent thing; transmute; transform: as, to convert grain into spirits; to convert one kind of property into another; to convert bank-notes into gold.
  • To change from one state or condition to another: as, to convert a barren waste into a fruitful field; to convert rude savages into civilized men.
  • In theology, to change the purpose, direction, and spirit of the life of (another) from one of self-seeking and enmity toward God to one of love toward God and man; turn from an evil life to a holy one.
  • To change or turn from one religion to another, or from one party or sect to another, especially from one that is regarded as false to one that is regarded as true.
  • To turn from one use or destination to another; divert from the proper or intended use; specifically, in law, of personal property, unlawfully to assume ownership of, or to assert a control over, inconsistent with that of the owner; appropriate without right to one's own use, or intentionally deprive of its use the one having the right thereto.
  • In logic, to transform by conversion. See conversion, To turn into or express in another language; translate.
  • To turn in course or direction; turn about.
  • To be changed; undergo a change.
  • To experience a change of heart; change the current of one's life from worldliness or selfishness to love of God and man.
  • In ship-building: To work up, as rough plank or timber, into the shape required for use on a vessel.
  • To alter so as to change the type to which a vessel belongs: as, to convert a steamer into a sailing-ship.
  • n. A person who is converted from one opinion or practice to another; one who renounces one creed, religious system, or party, and embraces another: used particularly of those who change their religious opinions, but applicable to any change from one belief or practice to another.
  • n. In theology, one who has been changed, as to the purpose and direction of his life, from sin to holiness.
  • n. In monasteries, a lay friar or brother admitted to the service of the house, without orders, and not allowed to sing in the choir.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. complete successfully
  • v. change from one system to another or to a new plan or policy
  • v. exchange a penalty for a less severe one
  • v. exchange or replace with another, usually of the same kind or category
  • v. change the nature, purpose, or function of something
  • n. a person who has been converted to another religious or political belief
  • v. cause to adopt a new or different faith
  • v. make (someone) agree, understand, or realize the truth or validity of something
  • v. change in nature, purpose, or function; undergo a chemical change
  • v. score (a spare)
  • v. change religious beliefs, or adopt a religious belief
  • v. score an extra point or points after touchdown by kicking the ball through the uprights or advancing the ball into the end zone

Etymologies

Middle English converten, from Old French convertir, from Latin convertere, to turn around : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French convertir, from Latin convertoĀ ("turn around") (Wiktionary)

Examples

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.