Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To embezzle (funds) or engage in embezzlement.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To embezzle

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To appropriate to one's own use the property of the public; to steal public moneys intrusted to one's care; to embezzle.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To appropriate to one′ s own use money or goods intrusted to one′ s care; embezzle; pilfer; steal: originally, as in the Roman law, denoting embezzlement of moneys of the state.
  • n. Peculation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. appropriate (as property entrusted to one's care) fraudulently to one's own use

Etymologies

Latin pecūlārī, pecūlāt-, from pecūlium, private property; see peku- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Latin peculatus. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I actually carry a notebook and when someone provides an insight or suggestion I write it down and let it "peculate" to see if, how, and where it makes since and how to apply it if it is considered valuable and beneficial to the path I am walking.

    So...What's Next?!?

  • The company has the financial heft to be an acquirer, and is nearly always mentioned as a potential buyer when analysts peculate about deals.

    GE Faces Hurdles in the Oil Patch

  • Inhabit the voices, pushing the choices, falling as you make those noises, poised, moist, peculate and mutilate just to sedate the rate at which I debate.

    poeticdragon Diary Entry

  • He is a most kind and indulgent master, and, provided his servants humor his peculiarities, flatter his vanity a little now and then, and do not peculate grossly on him before his face, they may manage him to perfection.

    John Bull

  • It is true that the excellent chef began to peculate, but as his cuisine did not suffer, the result was not noticeable for a long period.

    The Old Wives' Tale

  • The former is counted by hundreds of taels; the latter, by thousands, especially where there is a temptation to peculate.

    The Awakening of China

  • He is a most kind and indulgent master, and, provided his servants humor his peculiarities, flatter his vanity a little now and then, and do not peculate grossly on him before his face they may manage him to perfection.

    The Sketch-Book of Geoffrey Crayon

  • That great man little liked that any one but himself should peculate in his dominions, and, in the end, M. de Talleyrand was obliged to quit the

    Recollections of Europe

  • Now every honest man would say, -- "I came to a bad system: I had every facility of abusing my power, I had every temptation to peculate, I had every incitement to oppress, I had every means of concealment, by the defects of the system; but I corrected that evil system by the goodness of my administration, by the prudence, the energy, the virtue of my conduct."

    The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. 11 (of 12)

  • No man ever paid a bribe for the handling of the public money, but to peculate from it.

    The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. 10 (of 12)

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