Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One who betrays one's country, a cause, or a trust, especially one who commits treason.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who violates his allegiance and betrays his/her country; one guilty of treason; one who, in breach of trust, delivers his country to an enemy, or yields up any fort or place intrusted to his defense, or surrenders an army or body of troops to the enemy, unless when vanquished; also, one who takes arms and levies war against his country; or one who aids an enemy in conquering his country.
  • n. Hence, one who betrays any confidence or trust; a betrayer.
  • v. To act the traitor toward; to betray; to deceive.
  • adj. traitorous.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Traitorous.
  • n. One who violates his allegiance and betrays his country; one guilty of treason; one who, in breach of trust, delivers his country to an enemy, or yields up any fort or place intrusted to his defense, or surrenders an army or body of troops to the enemy, unless when vanquished; also, one who takes arms and levies war against his country; or one who aids an enemy in conquering his country. See treason.
  • n. Hence, one who betrays any confidence or trust; a betrayer.
  • transitive v. To act the traitor toward; to betray; to deceive.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who violates his allegiance and betrays his country; one who is guilty of treason. See treason.
  • n. One who betrays any trust; a person guilty of perfidy or treachery; one who violates confidence reposed in him.
  • n. Synonyms Rebel, etc. See insurgent.
  • Of or pertaining to a traitor; traitorous.
  • To act the traitor toward; betray.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a person who says one thing and does another
  • n. someone who betrays his country by committing treason

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from Latin trāditor, from trāditus, past participle of trādere, to betray; see tradition.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French traïtor (French: traître), from Latin traditor. (Wiktionary)

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