Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Chiefly British Father.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. father

Etymologies

Latin; see pəter- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin pater ("father"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • At first glance, an English word like father looks pretty different from the Latin word pater.

    The English Is Coming!

  • Yet it was only when the Senate also suggested that Livia henceforth be known as mater patriae Mother of Our Country—a play on the title pater patriae granted a decade previously to Augustus—and, more provocatively, that Tiberius’s official title should be qualified by the description “son of Julia” or “son of Livia” that the new emperor was moved to use his imperial veto.

    Caesars’ Wives

  • To use an Indo-European family example, we know that English father, foot, fish and Latin pater, ped -, pisc - are cognates because they show regular sound correspondences throughout.

    Societies, Religion, and History: Central East Tanzanians and the World They Created, c. 200 BCE to 1800 CE

  • From? pater,? we also get the Latin word for? fatherland,? so that now we know what a? patriot? is.

    Alliance

  • The word pater, for example, signifies not only a father, but your father, my father, his or her father, all included in a word.

    Dedication

  • Ruæus thinks that the word pater is to be referr’d to Evander, the father of Pallas.

    Dedication

  • The word pater, for instance, pronounced alike in both languages, differs in signification; being used in the one to imply father, in the other fire.

    ROCKY MOUNTAIN LIFE

  • The word pater, in the common acceptation, might be applicable to Saturn; for he was supposed to have been the father of all the Gods, and was therefore so entitled by the antient poet

    A New System; or, an Analysis of Antient Mythology. Volume I.

  • Very consistently, the PIE *p that shows up unchanged in Latin pater shifted in Germanic to the f we now have in English father.

    The English Is Coming!

  • Petrus Bonomo, a secretary of Frederick IV and Maximilian I, became Bishop of Triest in 1502, and was known as pater concilii in the fifth Lateran Council

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 15: Tournely-Zwirner

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