Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To gather for oneself, as for one's pleasure or profit: amassed a fortune. See Synonyms at gather.
  • transitive v. To accumulate or assemble a large quantity of: "The astronomers had amassed compelling evidence that the galaxies indeed were speeding away from the earth and from each other” ( George Johnson).
  • intransitive v. To come together; collect.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To collect into a mass or heap; to gather a great quantity of; to accumulate; as, to amass a treasure or a fortune; to amass words or phrases.
  • n. A mass; a heap.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A mass; a heap.
  • transitive v. To collect into a mass or heap; to gather a great quantity of; to accumulate

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To collect into a mass or heap; bring together a great amount, quantity, or number of: as, to amass a fortune.
  • n. An assemblage, a heap, or an accumulation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. collect or gather
  • v. get or gather together

Etymologies

Middle English, to accumulate, from Old French amasser, to assemble : a-, to (from Latin ad-; see ad-) + masser, to gather together (from Latin massa, lump, mass; see mass).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
French amasser, Late Latin amassare, ad + massa ("lump, mass"). See Mass. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The more people you can put out of work, the more dependent you can make them on government, the more Democrat voters you have, the more political power you can amass, which is what all good statists down through history have sought: total domination and control.

    RNC airs critical ads prior to Obama visit

  • Since his 1998 appointment as forestry minister, Obiang used his title to amass much of his fortune, prosecutors say.

    USATODAY.com News

  • The historians Blackburn and Ricards concluded that while prostitutes in Virginia City were not the richest people in town, they did amass more wealth than most of their customers.

    A Renegade History of the United States

  • Despite the boycott efforts of certain social conservatives, thousands of conservatives will amass in D.C. beginning Thursday for the Conservative Political Action Conference CPAC.

    How to make a splash at CPAC

  • With the zeal of a crusading physician hell-bent on finding a cure for her patient, she grilled judges, fellow coaches, and officials to amass their best advice.

    Welcome to My World

  • There were also ancestors who had managed to amass a considerable fortune.

    William and Kate

  • Yes | No | Report from jamesti wrote 3 weeks 2 hours ago now that is art! how long did it take him to amass that much bone?

    Christmas Tree Made Out of Shed Antlers

  • Given my present pace of shed-collection, it would take me a couple years to amass enough to create such a tree.

    Christmas Tree Made Out of Shed Antlers

  • I offered to take Cousin shopping, explaining how I knew it could be hard to amass a "grown-up" wardrobe.

    How many clues does one need to give an overly sexy dresser?

  • The allegations stem from Porsche's use of a complex options strategy to help amass nearly 75% of VW shares by October 2008.

    Porsche Deal Faces Delay as Probe Grows

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