Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To cause to adhere, as with glue.
  • transitive v. Linguistics To form (words) by combining words or words and word elements.
  • transitive v. Physiology To cause (red blood cells or bacteria) to clump together.
  • intransitive v. To join together into a group or mass.
  • intransitive v. Linguistics To form words by agglutination.
  • intransitive v. Physiology To clump together; undergo agglutination.
  • n. See agglutination.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. United with glue or as with glue; cemented together.
  • adj. Consisting of root words combined but not materially altered as to form or meaning; as, agglutinate forms, languages, etc.
  • v. To unite, or cause to adhere, as with glue or other viscous substance; to unite by causing an adhesion of substances.
  • v. To form through agglutination.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. United with glue or as with glue; cemented together.
  • adj. Consisting of root words combined but not materially altered as to form or meaning; See Agglutination, 2.
  • transitive v. To unite, or cause to adhere, as with glue or other viscous substance; to unite by causing an adhesion of substances.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To unite or cause to adhere, as with glue or other viscous substance; unite by causing an adhesion.
  • United as by glue; characterized by adherence or incorporation of distinct parts or elements: as, an agglutinate language. (See below.)
  • In bacterial., to cause the coalescence or clumping of (bacteria or red blood-corpuscles).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. string together (morphemes in an agglutinating language)
  • adj. united as if by glue
  • v. clump together; as of bacteria, red blood cells, etc.

Etymologies

Latin agglūtināre, agglūtināt- : ad-, ad- + glūtināre, to glue (from glūten, glue).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin agglutinatus, past participle of agglutinare, adglutinare ("to glue or cement to a thing"), from ad ("to") + glutinare ("to glue"), from gluten ("paste, glue"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • A red-hot molten mess shot through with glassy globules known as agglutinate, common on the moon but rare on Earth.

    One Small Step for Man, One Giant Mess in the Spacecraft

  • The fact appears to be, that these are what are now called agglutinate languages, and, like those of all savage tribes, in a continual course of alteration -- also often using a long periphrastic description to convey an idea or form a name.

    Pioneers and Founders or, Recent Workers in the Mission field

  • Again, by other chemical substances produced in it, the blood may, without actually killing the invading bacteria, only paralyse them, and cause them to "agglutinate" (that is, to adhere to one another as an inactive "clot" or "lump").

    More Science From an Easy Chair

  • John Baden writes, there is diminishing support for institutions that generate wealth rather than redistribute it...both positive and negative values increasingly converge and agglutinate.

    EconLog: Political Economy Archives

  • They agglutinate particles including volcanic fragments, foraminifera (a type of single-celled animal) and glass chips to form a test which can be up to 25cm.

    Seamount

  • In fractures of the ears, neither bandages nor cataplasms should be used; or, if any bandage be used, it should be put on very tight; the cerate and sulphur should be applied to agglutinate the bandages.

    Instruments Of Reduction

  • Two — four — six — eight, English should agglutinate!

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Guestblogging Dictionary Myths:

  • We discuss a mathematical model of contexts which allows a context to split into several contexts, agglutinate from several contexts, or to constellate out of relatively acontextual processing.

    The Title of this Blog

  • The ghost of a gist of an explanation for at least a few previously impenetrable imponderables began to agglutinate amongthe eddies of the Inspector's thoughts.

    The Mocking Program

  • Landsteiner had shown that under normal physiological conditions the blood serum will not agglutinate the erythrocytes of the same individual or those of other individuals with the same structure.

    Physiology or Medicine 1930 - Presentation Speech

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  • Ants show much attention to the eggs of their own species, fondling them, licking them, agglutinating them in packets, and rearranging them many times a day.

    - Caryl P. Haskins, Of Ants and Men, 1939, p. 106

    December 11, 2008