Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To stir to activity.
  • transitive v. To call forth (a reaction or emotion, for example); elicit: odd noises that excited our curiosity.
  • transitive v. To arouse strong feeling in: speakers who know how to excite a crowd. See Synonyms at provoke.
  • transitive v. Physiology To produce increased activity or response in (an organ, tissue, or part); stimulate.
  • transitive v. Physics To increase the energy of.
  • transitive v. Physics To raise (an atom, for example) to a higher energy level.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To stir the emotions of.
  • v. To arouse or bring out (eg feelings); to stimulate.
  • v. , (physics) To cause an electron to move to a higher than normal state; to promote an electron to an outer level.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To call to activity in any way; to rouse to feeling; to kindle to passionate emotion; to stir up to combined or general activity
  • transitive v. To call forth or increase the vital activity of an organism, or any of its parts.
  • transitive v. To energize (an electro-magnet); to produce a magnetic field in.
  • transitive v. To raise to a higher energy level; -- used especially of atoms or molecules, or of electrons within atoms or molecules.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To call into movement or active existence by some stimulating influence; quicken into manifestation; stir or start up; set in motion or operation: as, to excite a mutiny; to excite hope or animosity.
  • To induce action or activity in; stimulate; animate; arouse.
  • To impel by incentives or motives; instigate; incite: as, to excite the people to revolt.
  • To arouse the emotions of; agitate or perturb mentally; move: as, he was greatly excited by the news.
  • Synonyms To awaken, incite, inflame, kindle, irritate, provoke.
  • In electric machinery, to send current through the magnetic field coils, and so produce the magnetism required for the operation of the machine.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. stimulate sexually
  • v. act as a stimulant
  • v. stir feelings in
  • v. produce a magnetic field in
  • v. arouse or elicit a feeling
  • v. cause to be agitated, excited, or roused
  • v. stir the feelings, emotions, or peace of
  • v. raise to a higher energy level

Etymologies

Middle English exciten, from Latin excitāre, frequentative of exciēre : ex-, ex- + ciēre, to set in motion; see kei-2 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English exciten, from Old French exciter, from Latin excitare ("call out, call forth, arouse, wake up, stimulate"), frequentative of exciere ("call out, arouse excite"), from ex ("out") + ciere ("call, summon"). See cite and compare to accite, concite, incite. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The FBI indictments are to be unsealed today, which will once again excite the many people who likes to confuse the word “indictment” with “conviction.”

    Dallas Blog, Daily News, Dallas Politics, Opinion, and Commentary FrontBurner Blog D Magazine » Blog Archive » Leading Off

  • : The land of Gennezar, by the lake of Gennezareth, takes its name from a natural power which it is said to have of spontaneously modulating its waters so as to excite a breeze; the Greek words importing, ` creating for itself the breeze. '

    Catena Aurea - Gospel of Matthew

  • I hope that microscopic researches may again excite the attention of philosophers, as unforeseen advantages may probably be derived from them, like the discovery of

    Note I

  • The country teems with "poets, poetasters, poetitos, and poetaccios:" every man has his recognised position in literature as accurately defined as though he had been reviewed in a century of magazines, -- the fine ear of this people [22] causing them to take the greatest pleasure in harmonious sounds and poetical expressions, whereas a false quantity or a prosaic phrase excite their violent indignation.

    First Footsteps in East Africa

  • Video exciting 'to. long live eheads! p.s. part 2! part 2! kaka excite naman' to Eraserheads Reunion Tickets Go On Sale: It's About F@#$&** Time!

    PhilMusic.com

  • The difference is that you're the one claiming that we must "excite" the public, not me.

    Why the Moon? Here's Why. - NASA Watch

  • “poets, poetasters, poetitos, and poetaccios:” every man has his recognised position in literature as accurately defined as though he had been reviewed in a century of magazines, — the fine ear of this people22 causing them to take the greatest pleasure in harmonious sounds and poetical expressions, whereas a false quantity or a prosaic phrase excite their violent indignation.

    First footsteps in East Africa

  • I had hopes that he would continue to seek balance in his approach in order to neither "excite" nor "incite."

    James Zogby: Whiplash?

  • It's registered to Sony Pictures– its truly disgusting how Hollywood is using FEAR to get money and 'excite' horrify people into watching the movie.

    Roland Emmerich's 2012 Viral - Institute for Human Continuity « FirstShowing.net

  • "Maybe McCain DID have no choice but to proffer up an unqualified Fundie in order to 'excite' his Deep South Base."

    How did Sarah Palin get picked for VP?

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