Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A thrusting weapon with a long wooden shaft and a sharp metal head.
  • n. A similar implement for spearing fish.
  • n. A cavalry lancer.
  • n. Medicine See lancet.
  • transitive v. To pierce with a lance.
  • transitive v. Medicine To make a surgical incision in; cut into: lance a boil.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A weapon of war, consisting of a long shaft or handle and a steel blade or head; a spear carried by horsemen.
  • n. A wooden spear, sometimes hollow, used in jousting or tilting, designed to shatter on impact with the opposing knight’s armour.
  • n. A spear or harpoon used by whalers and fishermen.
  • n. A soldier armed with a lance; a lancer.
  • n. An instrument which conveys the charge of a piece of ordnance and forces it home.
  • n. A small iron rod which suspends the core of the mold in casting a shell.
  • n. One of the small paper cases filled with combustible composition, which mark the outlines of a figure.
  • n. A lancet.
  • v. To pierce with a lance, or with any similar weapon.
  • v. To open with a lancet; to pierce; as, to lance a vein or an abscess.
  • v. To throw in the manner of a lance; to lanch.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A weapon of war, consisting of a long shaft or handle and a steel blade or head; a spear carried by horsemen, and often decorated with a small flag; also, a spear or harpoon used by whalers and fishermen.
  • n. A soldier armed with a lance; a lancer.
  • n. A small iron rod which suspends the core of the mold in casting a shell.
  • n. An instrument which conveys the charge of a piece of ordnance and forces it home.
  • n. One of the small paper cases filled with combustible composition, which mark the outlines of a figure.
  • n. A lancet.
  • transitive v. To pierce with a lance, or with any similar weapon.
  • transitive v. To open with a lancet; to pierce.
  • transitive v. To throw in the manner of a lance. See Lanch.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To pierce with a lance, or with any sharp-pointed instrument.
  • To open with or as if with a lancet: as, to lance an abscess.
  • To throw in the manner of a javelin; launch.
  • To shoot forth as a lance.
  • To shoot or spring up.
  • To pierce.
  • n. A long spear used rather by couching and in the charge than for throwing; especially, the long spear of the middle ages, and of certain modern cavalry regiments in which the use of this arm is retained.
  • n. Any long and slender spear: applied loosely to weapons of savage tribes, etc.
  • n. The instrument with which a whale is killed after being harpooned and tired out.
  • n. In carpentry, a pointed blade, as that affixed to one side of a chipping-bit or router to sever the grain around the path of the tool. It is also used in certain crozes, gages, and planes.
  • n. A pyrotechnic squib used for various purposes.
  • n. An iron rod which is fixed across the earthen mold of a shell, and keeps it suspended in the air when the shell is cast.
  • n. One skilled in the use of the lance; a soldier armed with a lance; a lancer.
  • n. In ichthyology, same as sand-lance.
  • n. A balance.
  • n. A pointed stick of light timber used for the erection of a temporary telegraph-or telephone-line: used especially in military operations.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a surgical knife with a pointed double-edged blade; used for punctures and small incisions
  • n. a long pointed rod used as a tool or weapon
  • v. pierce with a lance, as in a knights' fight
  • v. move quickly, as if by cutting one's way
  • v. open by piercing with a lancet
  • n. an implement with a shaft and barbed point used for catching fish

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from Latin lancea, probably of Celtic origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French lance, from Latin lancea. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Watanabex says: so i guess we can come back to being racist now since lance is posting pedophile friendly films

    15 YEAR OLDS, LOCKER ROOM, DESIRE ERUPTS

  • WTF lance, is this some kind of joke that you forgot about?

    CHILDHOOD TO BE RAPED BY HOT CHICK

  • December 20th, 2007 at 12: 23 pm baedo says: the floodgates have opened. lance is furiously posting to avoid paying any attention to the adjacent fattys, i think.

    CHINESE PEOPLE PLAYING BASKETBALL

  • On the eve of our departure, I found my husband in the kitchen fashioning an impromptu lance from a now headless mop.

    French Word-A-Day:

  • The Spanish original is 'rejoneo' which is a form of bullfighting where the bull is stabbed repeatedly with a wooden lance from the back of a horse.

    Selling Smoke

  • January 23rd, 2008 at 5: 04 pm chodin says: lance is whore … lance is whore …

    DOCUMENTARY ROUNDUP

  • The lance was a suitable tool, but hardly one of the magical weapons of lore.

    Father Swarat

  • I would like to break a lance for a postcolonial approach when looking at Scandinavia and certainly Estonia, as long as we are clear what a postcolonial approach entails.

    Archive 2009-07-01

  • “Which of you,” he continued, addressing the guards whom he commanded, “is willing to be my comrade, and to break a lance with these gallants?”

    Quentin Durward

  • Were it not that he had a dame, and a fair one, I would have thought that he meant to break a lance for the prize himself.

    Quentin Durward

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Comments

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  • lie javelin , spear ..

    March 24, 2013

  • Long pointed pole used as a weapon in war and jousting.

    August 25, 2008

  • May 4, 2007

  • When he leaps amidst us, with combustive dance
    All shall bear the branding, of his thermal lance
    - Exciter, Judas Priest

    May 4, 2007