Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To propel through the air with a motion of the hand or arm.
  • transitive v. To discharge into the air by any means: a machine that throws tennis balls; ash that was thrown by an erupting volcano.
  • transitive v. To hurl or fling with great force or speed: threw themselves on the food; jetsam that had been thrown up onto the shore.
  • transitive v. To force (an opponent) to the ground or floor, as in wrestling or the martial arts.
  • transitive v. To cause to fall off: The horse threw its rider.
  • transitive v. Informal To cause confusion or perplexity in; disconcert or nonplus: We didn't let our worries throw us.
  • transitive v. To put on or off hastily or carelessly: throw on a jacket.
  • transitive v. To put (suddenly or forcefully) into a given condition, position, or activity: threw him into a fit of laughter; threw some supper together; threw her leg over the arm of the chair.
  • transitive v. To devote, apply, or direct: threw all their resources into the new endeavor; threw the blame onto the others.
  • transitive v. To form on a potter's wheel: throw a vase.
  • transitive v. To twist (fibers) into thread.
  • transitive v. Games To roll (dice).
  • transitive v. Games To roll (a particular combination) with dice.
  • transitive v. Games To discard or play (a card).
  • transitive v. To send forth; project: She threw me a look of encouragement.
  • transitive v. To cause (one's voice) to seem to come from a source other than oneself.
  • transitive v. To cause to fall on or over something; cast: The rising sun threw shadows across the lawn. We threw sheets over the furniture before we painted the ceiling.
  • transitive v. To bear (young). Used of cows or horses, for example.
  • transitive v. To arrange or give (a party, for example).
  • transitive v. To move (a lever or switch) in order to activate, deactivate, or control a device.
  • transitive v. Informal To lose or give up (a contest, for example) purposely.
  • transitive v. To abandon oneself to; have: heard the news and threw a fit.
  • transitive v. To commit (oneself), especially for leniency or support: threw himself on the mercy of the court.
  • transitive v. To deliver (a punch), as in boxing: threw a left hook.
  • intransitive v. To cast, fling, or hurl something.
  • n. The act or an instance of throwing.
  • n. The distance to which something is or can be thrown: a stone's throw away.
  • n. Games A roll or cast of dice.
  • n. Games The combination of numbers so obtained.
  • n. Informal A single chance, venture, or instance: "could afford up to forty-five bucks a throw to wax sentimental over their heritage” ( John Simon).
  • n. Sports The act of throwing or a technique used to throw an opponent in wrestling or the martial arts.
  • n. A light coverlet, such as an afghan.
  • n. A scarf or shawl.
  • n. The radius of a circle described by a crank, cam, or similar machine part.
  • n. The maximum displacement of a machine part moved by another part, such as a crank or cam.
  • n. Geology The amount of vertical displacement of a fault.
  • throw away To get rid of as useless: threw away yesterday's newspaper.
  • throw away Games To discard: threw away two aces.
  • throw away To fail to take advantage of: threw away a chance to make a fortune.
  • throw away To waste or use in a foolish way: threw away her inheritance.
  • throw away To utter or perform in an offhand, seemingly careless way: The play's villain throws away the news that the house has burned down.
  • throw back To hinder the progress of; check: The troops were thrown back.
  • throw back To revert to an earlier type or stage in one's past.
  • throw back To cause to depend; make reliant.
  • throw in To insert or introduce into the course of something: threw in a few snide comments while they conversed.
  • throw in To add (an extra thing or amount) with no additional charge.
  • throw in To engage (a clutch, for example).
  • throw off To cast out; rid oneself of: threw off all unpleasant memories.
  • throw off To give off; emit: exhaust pipes throwing off fumes.
  • throw off To distract, divert, or mislead: Crossing the stream, he threw the tracking dogs off. A wrong measurement threw her estimate off.
  • throw off To do, finish, or accomplish in a casual or offhand way; toss off: threw off a quick response to the letter.
  • throw open To make more accessible, especially suddenly or dramatically: threw open the nomination.
  • throw out To give off; emit: searchlights throwing out powerful beams.
  • throw out To reject or discard: The committee threw out her proposal.
  • throw out To get rid of as useless: threw out the garbage.
  • throw out Informal To offer, as a suggestion or plan: They sat around throwing out names of people they might want to invite to the party.
  • throw out To force to leave a place or position, especially in an abrupt or unexpected manner: The convicted judge was thrown out of office. The headwaiter threw the disorderly guest out.
  • throw out To disengage (a clutch, for example).
  • throw out To put out of alignment: threw my back out.
  • throw out Baseball To put out (a base runner) by throwing the ball to the player guarding the base to which the base runner is moving.
  • throw over To overturn: threw the cart over.
  • throw over To abandon: threw over her boyfriend of four years; threw over the company they themselves had founded.
  • throw over To reject.
  • throw up To vomit.
  • throw up To abandon; relinquish. She threw up her campaign for mayor.
  • throw up To construct hurriedly: shoddy houses that were thrown up in a few months.
  • throw up To refer to something repeatedly: She threw up his past to him whenever they argued.
  • throw up To project, play, or otherwise display (a slide, videotape, or other recorded image): threw the tape of vacation highlights up on the screen.
  • idiom throw cold water on To express misgivings about or disapproval of; discourage.
  • idiom towel To admit defeat; give up.
  • idiom throw oneself at To make efforts to attract the interest or affection of (another).
  • idiom throw (one's) weight around Slang To use power or authority, especially in an excessive or heavy-handed way.
  • idiom throw the baby out with the bath water Slang To discard something valuable along with something not desired, usually unintentionally.
  • idiom throw up (one's) hands To indicate or express utter hopelessness: He threw up his hands and abandoned the argument.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To cause an object to move rapidly through the air.
  • v. To eject or cause to fall off.
  • v. To move to another position; to displace.
  • v. To make (a pot) by shaping clay as it turns on a wheel.
  • v. Of a bowler, to deliver (the ball) illegally by straightening the bowling arm during delivery.
  • v. To send (an error) to an exception-handling mechanism in order to interrupt normal processing.
  • v. to intentionally lose a game
  • v. To confuse or mislead.
  • v. To send desperately
  • v. To imprison.
  • v. To organize an event, especially a party.
  • v. To roll (a die or dice).
  • v. To cause a certain number on the die or dice to be shown after rolling it.
  • v. To discard
  • v. To lift the opponent off the ground and bring him back down, especially into a position behind the thrower.
  • v. To subject someone to verbally.
  • v. To give birth to.
  • v. To change in order to give the illusion that the voice is that of someone else.
  • v. To show sudden emotion, especially anger.
  • v. To project or send forth
  • n. The flight of a thrown object; as, a fast throw.
  • n. The act of throwing something.
  • n. A distance travelled; displacement; as, the throw of the piston.
  • n. A piece of fabric used to cover a bed, sofa or other soft furnishing.
  • n. A single instance, occurrence, venture, or chance.
  • n. Pain, especially pain associated with childbirth; throe.
  • n. The act of giving birth in animals, especially in cows.
  • n. A moment, time, occasion.
  • n. A period of time; a while.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Pain; especially, pain of travail; throe.
  • n. Time; while; space of time; moment; trice.
  • n. The act of hurling or flinging; a driving or propelling from the hand or an engine; a cast.
  • n. A stroke; a blow.
  • n. The distance which a missile is, or may be, thrown.
  • n. A cast of dice; the manner in which dice fall when cast.
  • n. An effort; a violent sally.
  • n. The extreme movement given to a sliding or vibrating reciprocating piece by a cam, crank, eccentric, or the like; travel; stroke. Also, frequently, the length of the radius of a crank, or the eccentricity of an eccentric.
  • n. A potter's wheel or table; a jigger. See 2d Jigger, 2 (a).
  • n. A turner's lathe; a throwe.
  • n. The amount of vertical displacement produced by a fault; -- according to the direction it is designated as an upthrow, or a downthrow.
  • intransitive v. To perform the act of throwing or casting; to cast; specifically, to cast dice.
  • transitive v. To fling, cast, or hurl with a certain whirling motion of the arm, to throw a ball; -- distinguished from to toss, or to bowl.
  • transitive v. To fling or cast in any manner; to drive to a distance from the hand or from an engine; to propel; to send.
  • transitive v. To drive by violence.
  • transitive v. To cause to take a strategic position.
  • transitive v. To overturn; to prostrate in wrestling.
  • transitive v. To cast, as dice; to venture at dice.
  • transitive v. To put on hastily; to spread carelessly.
  • transitive v. To divest or strip one's self of; to put off.
  • transitive v. To form or shape roughly on a throwing engine, or potter's wheel, as earthen vessels.
  • transitive v. To give forcible utterance to; to cast; to vent.
  • transitive v. To bring forth; to produce, as young; to bear; -- said especially of rabbits.
  • transitive v. To twist two or more filaments of, as silk, so as to form one thread; to twist together, as singles, in a direction contrary to the twist of the singles themselves; -- sometimes applied to the whole class of operations by which silk is prepared for the weaver.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To turn; twist; specifically, to form into threads by twisting two or more filaments together, or by twisting two or more singles together in a direction contrary to the twist of the singles themselves: as, to throw silk: sometimes applied in a wide sense to the whole series of operations by which silk is prepared for the weaver.
  • To shape on a potters' wheel.
  • To fashion by turning on a lathe; turn.
  • To cast; heave; pitch; toss; fling: literally or figuratively: as, to throw a stone at a bird.
  • To cast with sudden force or violence: impel violently; hurl; dash: as, the shock threw the wall down.
  • To fling; floor; give a fall to, as in wrestling; unhorse, as in justing.
  • To unseat and bring to the ground.
  • To cast; shed.
  • To spread or put on carelessly or hurriedly: as, to throw a shawl over one's shoulders.
  • To advance or place quickly, as by some rapid movement.
  • To bring forth; produce, as young; bear; cast: said especially of rabbits.
  • To make a cast with, as dice; play with, as dice; make (a cast of dice).
  • In card-playing, to lay upon the table; play, as a card.
  • To turn; direct; cast: as, to throw one's eyes to the ground.
  • To sell, as a race or game; allow another to win unnecessarily or in accordance with previous agreement.
  • To part with without compensation; give or spend recklessly; squander; lose by negligence or folly; waste.
  • To reject; refuse; lose by indifference or neglect: as, to throw away a good offer.
  • To reject; refuse.
  • To cast back, as a slur or an insinuation.
  • To bring from an erect or exalted to a prostrate position or condition; hence, to overturn; subvert; demolish; destroy.
  • To put in or deposit along with another or others: as, he has thrown in his fortune with yours.
  • To interpolate: as, he threw in a word now and then.
  • To add without reckoning, or as if to complete or effect a bargain or sale: as, I will throw in this book if you buy the lot.
  • To discard; dismiss: as, to throw off an acquaintance or a dependent.
  • To do or say in a rapid offhand manner: as, to throw off a poem.
  • To give free or unrestricted access to; remove all barriers, obstacles, or restrictions from: as, the appointment was thrown open to public competition.
  • To cause to project, or to become prominent; build out: as, to throw out a pier or landing-stage, or a wing of a building.
  • To emit: as, that lamp throws out a bright light.
  • To give utterance to; insinuate: as, to throwout a hint.
  • To put off the right track; confuse; embarrass: as, interruption throws one out.
  • To leave behind: distance: as, a horse thrown completely out of the race.
  • To reject; exclude: as, the bill was thrown out on the second reading.
  • In printing, to reject or throw aside, as printed sheets that are imperfect.
  • In base-ball, to put out, as a base-runner, by a ball fielded to one of the players on or near a base.
  • In cricket, to put out (a batsman) when he is out of his ground by a fielder hitting the wicket.
  • To erect or build rapidly; construct: as, to throw up a scaffolding.
  • To give up; resign; abandon: as, to throw up an appointment.
  • To eject or discharge from the stomach; vomit.
  • To cast or fling: as, he throws well at base-ball, but catches badly.
  • To cast dice.
  • To fall; be cast down.
  • An obsolete spelling of throe.
  • n. 10. A crank.
  • n. The length or lever-arm of a crank.
  • n. In electricity, the angular movement or swing of the needle of a galvanometer, with incompletely damped motion, measured from the zero-point to the turning-point of its first excursion.
  • n. The act of throwing, flinging, or hurling; a cast, either from the hand or from an engine; a fling.
  • n. A cast of dice; the manner in which dice fall when cast; hence, risk; venture.
  • n. In angling, the cast of a line.
  • n. A thrust; a stroke; a blow.
  • n. The distance which a missile may be thrown by the hand.
  • n. In steam-engines, the extreme movement of a slide-valve, or of a crank or an eccentric, measured on a straight line passing through the center of motion.
  • n. In geology and mining, a fault or dislocation of the strata; a leap. Of late the term throw has been more generally used to denote the amount of vertical displacement caused by a leap or fault. See the quotations.
  • n. An implement or a machine for giving to anything a rapid rotary motion, especially in the industrial arts, as a potters' wheel, a turners' lathe.
  • n. In mathematics, a complexus of four elements of the same elementary figure, regard being had to their linear order, as four points on a line, four lines of a plane pencil, and the like. Two projective throws are said to be equal.
  • n. A space of time; a moment; a while.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. organize or be responsible for
  • v. get rid of
  • v. to put into a state or activity hastily, suddenly, or carelessly
  • v. put or send forth
  • v. convey or communicate; of a smile, a look, a physical gesture
  • v. utter with force; utter vehemently
  • n. a single chance or instance
  • n. bedclothes consisting of a lightweight cloth covering (an afghan or bedspread) that is casually thrown over something
  • v. place or put with great energy
  • n. the act of throwing (propelling something with a rapid movement of the arm and wrist)
  • v. cause to fall off
  • n. casting an object in order to determine an outcome randomly
  • n. the maximum movement available to a pivoted or reciprocating piece by a cam
  • v. throw (a die) out onto a flat surface
  • v. be confusing or perplexing to; cause to be unable to think clearly
  • v. move violently, energetically, or carelessly
  • v. make on a potter's wheel
  • v. propel through the air

Etymologies

Middle English throwen, to turn, twist, hurl, from Old English thrāwan.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English throwen, thrawen, from Old English þrāwan ("to turn, twist, curl, rack, torture, turn around"), from Proto-Germanic *þrēanan (“to turn”), from Proto-Indo-European *ter- (“to rub, rub by twisting, twist, turn”). Cognate with Scots thraw ("to twist, turn, throw"), Dutch draaien ("to turn"), Low German draien, dreien ("to turn (in a lathe)"), German drehen ("to turn"), Danish dreje ("to turn"), Swedish dreja ("to turn"), Albanian dredh ("to turn, twist, tremble"). (Wiktionary)
Middle English throwe, alteration of thrawe from Old English þrāwu ("labor pang, agony in childbirth or death"), akin to Old English þrēa ("affliction, pang"), þrōwan ("to suffer"). More at throe (Wiktionary)
From Middle English, from Old English þrāh, þrāg ("space of time, period, while"). Of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Gothic 𐌸𐍂𐌰𐌲𐌾𐌰𐌽 (þragjan, "to run"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • How about a throw back to the old(en) days?

    January 12, 2011

  • Oh, ouch!
    *giggle*

    January 12, 2011

  • How about horseshoe throwing competitions?

    January 12, 2011

  • Or being thrown out of a party.

    January 12, 2011

  • Now I'm going to giggle inappropriately if anyone mentions being thrown from a horse.

    January 12, 2011

  • What with cleaning up all the manure and straw afterwards I don't feel I could bear a party this weekend.

    January 12, 2011

  • "18. To bear (young). Used of cows or horses, for example."

    --American Heritage Dictionary

    January 12, 2011