Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To submit (oneself) passively; accept as inevitable: I resigned myself to a long wait in line.
  • transitive v. To give up (a position, for example), especially by formal notification.
  • transitive v. To relinquish (a privilege, right, or claim). See Synonyms at relinquish.
  • intransitive v. To give up one's job or office; quit, especially by formal notification: resign from a board of directors.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Alternative spelling of re-sign.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To sign back; to return by a formal act; to yield to another; to surrender; -- said especially of office or emolument. Hence, to give up; to yield; to submit; -- said of the wishes or will, or of something valued; -- also often used reflexively.
  • transitive v. To relinquish; to abandon.
  • transitive v. To commit to the care of; to consign.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To assign back; return formally; give up; give back, as an office or a commission, to the person or authority that conferred it; hence, to surrender; relinquish; give over; renounce.
  • To withdraw, as a claim; give up; abandon.
  • To yield or give up in a confiding or trusting spirit; submit, particularly to Providence.
  • To submit without resistance; yield; commit.
  • To intrust; consign; commit to the care of.
  • Synonyms To abandon, renounce, abdicate. Resign differs from the words compared under forsake in expressing primarily a formal and deliberate act, in being the ordinary word for giving up formally an elective office or an appointment, and in having similar figurative use.
  • To submit one's self; yield; endure with resignation.
  • To give up an office, commission, post, or the like.
  • To sign again.
  • n. Resignation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. leave (a job, post, or position) voluntarily
  • v. give up or retire from a position
  • v. part with a possession or right
  • v. accept as inevitable

Etymologies

Middle English resignen, from Old French resigner, from Latin resignāre, to unseal : re-, re- + signāre, to seal (from signum, mark, seal; see sekw-1 in Indo-European roots).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Anglo-Norman reisgner, Middle French resigner, and its source, Latin resignāre ("to unseal, annul, assign, resign"), from re- + signāre ("to seal, stamp"). (Wiktionary)
re- + sign (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • Haha! Just so.

    December 13, 2007

  • To be fired.

    December 13, 2007

  • Contronymic in the sense: re-up vs. quit.

    January 27, 2007