Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To twist together (threads, for example); intertwine.
  • transitive v. To form by twisting, intertwining, or interlacing.
  • transitive v. To encircle or coil about: The fence post was twined by vines.
  • transitive v. To wind, coil, or wrap around something: "She was twining a wisp of hair very slowly around her fingers” ( Anne Tyler).
  • intransitive v. To become twisted, interlaced, or interwoven.
  • intransitive v. To go in a winding course; twist about: a stream twining through the forest.
  • n. A strong string or cord made of two or more threads twisted together.
  • n. Something formed by twining: a twine of bread dough.
  • n. A tangle; a knot.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A twist; a convolution.
  • n. A strong thread composed of two or three smaller threads or strands twisted together, and used for various purposes, as for binding small parcels, making nets, and the like; a small cord or string.
  • n. The act of twining or winding round.
  • n. Intimate and suggestive dance gyrations.
  • v. To weave together.
  • v. To mutually twist together; to become mutually involved.
  • v. To wind; to bend; to make turns; to meander.
  • v. To turn round; to revolve.
  • v. To ascend in spiral lines about a support; to climb spirally.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A twist; a convolution.
  • n. A strong thread composed of two or three smaller threads or strands twisted together, and used for various purposes, as for binding small parcels, making nets, and the like; a small cord or string.
  • n. The act of twining or winding round.
  • intransitive v. To mutually twist together; to become mutually involved.
  • intransitive v. To wind; to bend; to make turns; to meander.
  • intransitive v. To turn round; to revolve.
  • intransitive v. To ascend in spiral lines about a support; to climb spirally.
  • transitive v. To twist together; to form by twisting or winding of threads; to wreathe.
  • transitive v. To wind, as one thread around another, or as any flexible substance around another body.
  • transitive v. To wind about; to embrace; to entwine.
  • transitive v. To change the direction of.
  • transitive v. To mingle; to mix.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A double thread; a thread made of two strands twisted; hence, any coarse strand or cord, or, by extension, a fabric woven of such threads; in modern use, a cord composed of several strands, especially when made of hemp or manila; also, a strong thread made of hemp or cotton, used in sewing sails.
  • n. The act of twining or twisting; spinning.
  • n. A curving, winding, or twisting movement or form; a convolution; a coil; a twist.
  • n. A clasping; an embrace.
  • n. An intertwining or interlacing; a tangle; a snarl.
  • n. Duality.
  • Consisting of double (usually coarse) thread; specifically, consisting or made of twine. See I., 1.
  • To make double, as thread, by twisting two strands together; hence, to twist; intertwine.
  • To form of twisted threads or filaments; make by intertwining; in general, to weave.
  • To wind or coil about something, as in clasping or embracing it; wreathe; coil.
  • To encircle; entwine; curl around.
  • To interweave; interlock; intermingle; mix; blend.
  • To blend or unite by twisting or winding; intertwine; be interwoven.
  • To wind; curl; coil; specifically, of plants, to grow in convolutions about a support. See twining.
  • To warp.
  • To make turns or flexures; wind; meander.
  • To separate; divide; part.
  • To turn.
  • To fall.
  • To languish; pine away. Probably confused with dwine.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. make by twisting together or intertwining
  • v. spin,wind, or twist together
  • v. form into a spiral shape
  • v. arrange or or coil around
  • n. a lightweight cord

Etymologies

Middle English twinen, from twin, twine, from Old English twīn, double thread; see dwo- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English twine, twyne, twin, from Old English twīn ("double thread, twist, twine, linen-thread, linen"), from Proto-Germanic *twiznaz (“thread, twine”), from Proto-Indo-European *dwisnós (“double”), from *dwóh₁ (“two”). Cognate with Dutch twijn ("twine"), Dutch tweern ("thread, twine"), German Zwirn ("thread"), Icelandic tvinni ("a double-thread"). More at twire. (Wiktionary)
From Middle English twinen, twynen, from Old English *twīnian ("to twine, thread"), from Proto-Germanic *twiznōnan (“to thread”), from Proto-Indo-European *dwisnós (“double”), from *dwóh₁ (“two”). Cognate with Dutch twijnen ("to twine, contort, throw"), Danish tvinde ("to twist"), Swedish tvinna ("to twist, twine, throw"), Icelandic tvinna ("to merge, twine"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • By cord he means something strong, almost what we call twine; a thin cord he always calls a string; his twine is the lightest sort of string.

    Chapter 4. American and English Today. 2. Differences in Usage

  • Pull up on the camera until the twine is taut and vertical shake is a thing of the past, along with significant dampening of horizontal shake.

    Boing Boing

  • Erik packed up all the cardboard in twine to get it ready for recycling tomorrow.

    HELP!

  • "Nu?" said Zaretsky, in his cracked voice, cutting the twine from the bundle and unfolding a feather bed.

    Hungry Hearts

  • The twine is woven into rugs, mats, sacks, ropes, harness, even to the bits, and dainty little purses, which tourists buy up like precious articles.

    Six Months in Mexico

  • Or much shorter, I’m so sick of the gun-rights canard that because I can kill someone with twine in the form of a garotte, that twine is of equal social risk and harm as a handgun.

    Matthew Yglesias » Checks and Balances

  • Then we did newspapers including glossy inserts but were careful not to tie the bundles in twine, which is always the temptation.

    Underworld

  • We bundle the newspapers but do not tie them in twine, which is always the temptation.

    Underworld

  • I just looking at a postcard underneath two sheets of cardboard wrapped in twine.

    I'll be your happy ending (Music (For Robots))

  • The twine was the same the Woodpeckers had used in removing brush from the Valley.

    Stillwater

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Comments

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  • Lisle is related to twine.

    January 3, 2010