Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of superior quality, skill, or appearance: a fine day; a fine writer.
  • adj. Very small in size, weight, or thickness: fine type; fine paper.
  • adj. Free from impurities.
  • adj. Metallurgy Containing pure metal in a specified proportion or amount: gold 21 carats fine.
  • adj. Very sharp; keen: a blade with a fine edge.
  • adj. Thin; slender: fine hairs.
  • adj. Exhibiting careful and delicate artistry: fine china. See Synonyms at delicate.
  • adj. Consisting of very small particles; not coarse: fine dust.
  • adj. Subtle or precise: a fine difference.
  • adj. Able to make or detect effects of great subtlety or precision; sensitive: has a fine eye for color.
  • adj. Trained to the highest degree of physical efficiency: a fine racehorse.
  • adj. Characterized by refinement or elegance.
  • adj. Satisfactory; acceptable: Handing in your paper on Monday is fine.
  • adj. Being in a state of satisfactory health; quite well: I'm fine. And you?
  • adj. Used as an intensive: a fine mess.
  • adv. Finely.
  • adv. Informal Very well: doing fine.
  • transitive v. To make or become finer, purer, or cleaner.
  • n. A sum of money required to be paid as a penalty for an offense.
  • n. Law A forfeiture or penalty to be paid to the offended party in a civil action.
  • n. Law An amicable settlement of a suit over land ownership.
  • n. Obsolete An end; a termination.
  • transitive v. To require the payment of a fine from; impose a fine on.
  • idiom in fine In conclusion; finally.
  • idiom in fine In summation; in brief.
  • n. Music The end.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of superior quality.
  • adj. Of a particular grade of quality, usually between very good and very fine, and below mint.
  • adj. Sunny and not raining.
  • adj. Being acceptable, adequate, passable, or satisfactory.
  • adj. Good-looking, attractive.
  • adj. Consisting of especially minute particulate; made up of particularly small pieces.
  • adj. Particularly slender; especially thin, narrow, or of small girth.
  • adj. Made of slender or thin filaments.
  • adj. Subtle, delicately balanced.
  • adj. Behind the batsman and at a small angle to the line between the wickets.
  • adv. expression of agreement
  • adv. well, nicely, in a positive way
  • n. Fine champagne; French brandy.
  • n. something that is fine; fine particles
  • v. to make finer, purer, or cleaner
  • v. to become finer, purer, or cleaner
  • v. to clarify (wine and beer) by filtration
  • n. A fee levied as punishment for breaking the law.
  • v. To issue a fine as punishment to (someone).
  • n. The end of a musical composition.
  • n. The location in a musical score that indicates the end of the piece, particularly when the piece ends somewhere in the middle of the score due to a section of the music being repeated.
  • v. To finish; to cease.
  • v. To cause to cease; to stop.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Finished; brought to perfection; refined; hence, free from impurity; excellent; superior; elegant; worthy of admiration; accomplished; beautiful.
  • adj. Aiming at show or effect; loaded with ornament; overdressed or overdecorated; showy.
  • adj. Nice; delicate; subtle; exquisite; artful; skillful; dexterous.
  • adj. Not coarse, gross, or heavy.
  • adj. Not gross; subtile; thin; tenous.
  • adj. Not coarse; comminuted; in small particles.
  • adj. Not thick or heavy; slender; filmy.
  • adj. Thin; attenuate; keen.
  • adj. Made of fine materials; light; delicate.
  • adj. Having (such) a proportion of pure metal in its composition.
  • adj. (Used ironically.)
  • adv. Finely; well; elegantly; fully; delicately; mincingly.
  • adv. In a manner so that the driven ball strikes the object ball so far to one side as to be deflected but little, the object ball being driven to one side.
  • n. End; conclusion; termination; extinction.
  • n. A sum of money paid as the settlement of a claim, or by way of terminating a matter in dispute; especially, a payment of money imposed upon a party as a punishment for an offense; a mulct.
  • n.
  • n. A final agreement concerning lands or rents between persons, as the lord and his vassal.
  • n. A sum of money or price paid for obtaining a benefit, favor, or privilege, as for admission to a copyhold, or for obtaining or renewing a lease.
  • v. To finish; to cease; or to cause to cease.
  • intransitive v. To pay a fine. See fine, n., 3 (b).
  • intransitive v. To become fine (in any one of various senses).
  • transitive v. To make fine; to refine; to purify, to clarify.
  • transitive v. To make finer, or less coarse, as in bulk, texture, etc.; as. to fine the soil.
  • transitive v. To change by fine gradations; as (Naut.), to fine down a ship's lines, to diminish her lines gradually.
  • transitive v. To impose a pecuniary penalty upon for an offense or breach of law; to set a fine on by judgment of a court; to punish by fine; to mulct.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To bring to an end.
  • To subject to a pecuniary penalty; set a fine upon, as by judgment of a court or by any competent authority; punish by fine: as, jurors are fined for non-attendance; absent members are fined.
  • To pay by way of fine or fee.
  • To pledge; pawn.
  • To condemn; pronounce judgment against.
  • To come to an end; end; cease.
  • To pay a fine; procure acknowledgment of one's right or claim by pecuniary compensation.
  • In general, finished; consummate; perfect in form or quality; polished, adroit, in manner or action; delicate, slender, minute, thin, rare, in size, proportion, or consistence: opposed to coarse, gross, crude, rough, unfinished, etc.
  • Specifically Excellent or perfect in form, style, or aspect; beautiful; attractive; showy: as, a man of fine appearance; a fine horse; a fine house or landscape; a fine display of flags.
  • Exquisite or elegant in manner, action, appearance, or use; making or constituting an attractive or imposing display; aiming to please; pleasing; gratifying: as, a fine lady or gentleman; fine feathers make fine birds; fine clothes or furniture.
  • Perfect or excellent in kind; suitable or admirable in character or quality; very fit or proper; superior: as, fine roads; fine weather; fine sport; a fine entertainment.
  • Of exquisite quality; refined; choice; elegant; delicate; dainty: as, a fine compliment; a fine wine; fine workmanship; fine texture; fine manners.
  • Attracting pleased or interested attention; admirable; notable; remarkable; striking: often ironical: as, some fine day you will discover your mistake.
  • Expert in knowledge or action; accomplished; skilled or skilful; adroit; apt; handy: as, a fine actor or musician; a fine scholar or workman.
  • Delicate in perception or feeling; nicely discriminating; acutely susceptible to impressions: as, a fine wit; a fine taste; a fine sense of color.
  • Minutely precise or exact; subtle: as, a fine distinction; a fine point in an argument.
  • Free from foreign matter; without dross or feculence or other impurities; clear; pure; refined: as, fine gold; fine oil.
  • Delicate or choice in material, texture, or style; light, thin, elegant, tasteful, etc., according to the nature of the thing spoken of: as, fine silk or wool; fine linen or cambric.
  • Thin in consistence; subtile; rare; tenuous: as, fine spirits evaporate rapidly.
  • Consisting of minute particles, grains, drops, flakes, etc.: as, fine sand or flour; fine rain or snow; fine shot.
  • Very small in girth or diameter; slender; attenuated: as, fine thread; fine wire; a fine hair; a fine needle.
  • Keen; sharp; easily penetrating: as, the fine edge of a razor; a fine point, as of a needle or a thorn.
  • Sheer; mere; pure; absolute: in the old phrase fine force.
  • A casting from a mold in the preparation of which special care has been taken. See figure-casting.
  • To make fine or pure; purify; clarify; refine: as, to fine gold or silver; to fine wine.
  • To make fine or slender; make less coarse: as, to fine grass.
  • To change by imperceptible degrees; cause to pass by fine gradations to another or more perfect state.
  • To become fine or pure; become clear, as by depositing sediment: often followed by down.
  • To become fine or thin; melt or fade.
  • Finely; well: as, I wad like fine to do it.
  • Delicately; cautiously.
  • In ship-building, to reduce the lateral dimensions of a vessel below the water-line.
  • n. End; termination; conclusion.
  • n. Specifically The end of life; death.
  • n. In old English law, a judicial proceeding, often fictitious, resorted to merely as a mode of conveyance of land. The persons concerned in the transfer were made parties to a fictitious action, in which the transferrer solemnly acknowledged the land to be the property of the transferee, thus by apparent compromise putting an end to the suit. It was used very commonly as a means of putting an end to an entail.
  • n. In feudal law: A final agreement between persons concerning lands or rents, or between the lord and his vassal prescribing the conditions on which the latter should hold his lands.
  • n. A sum of money paid by custom by a tenant to his lord, nominally as a gratuity, and distinct from rent. This custom belongs solely to feudal tenures and to those modified by the feudal law, as copyholds. Fines were paid usually at a transfer of the tenant's estate by alienation or succession, but sometimes on other occasions, as at the death of the lord.
  • n. The exaction of a money payment as a punishment for an offense or a dereliction of any kind; a mulct: as, a fine for assault; the fines prescribed in the constitution of a society.
  • n. The sum of money so exacted.
  • n. An agreement to do something, as in reparation or restitution; composition; atonement; penance.
  • n. In conclusion; to conclude; to sum up.
  • n. In musical notation, the word indicating the end of a repeated section, whether da capo or dal segno; also, the end of a composition in several sections.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adv. in a delicate manner
  • adj. free from impurities; having a high or specified degree of purity
  • adj. minutely precise especially in differences in meaning
  • adv. an expression of agreement normally occurring at the beginning of a sentence
  • v. issue a ticket or a fine to as a penalty
  • n. money extracted as a penalty
  • adj. of textures that are smooth to the touch or substances consisting of relatively small particles
  • adj. characterized by elegance or refinement or accomplishment
  • adj. thin in thickness or diameter
  • adj. being satisfactory or in satisfactory condition

Etymologies

Middle English fin, from Old French, from Latin fīnis, end, supreme degree.
Middle English fin, from Old French, settlement, compensation, from Medieval Latin fīnis, from Latin, end.
Italian, from Latin fīnis, end.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English fin, from Old French fin ("fine, minute, exact"), probably, from Latin finitus ("literally finished (used as an adjective by Cicero, of words, well rounded)"), past participle of finere ("to limit, bound, define, terminate, finish"), from finis ("a limit, end"). (Wiktionary)
From Italian fine ("end"). (Wiktionary)
Old French finer, French finir. See finish (transitive verb). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • "Fine as a cow turd stuck with primroses."
    - Francis Grose, 'The Vulgar Tongue'.

    September 6, 2008