Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Being in an early period of life, development, or growth.
  • adj. Newly begun or formed; not advanced: The evening is still young.
  • adj. Of, belonging to, or suggestive of youth or early life: He is young for his age.
  • adj. Vigorous or fresh; youthful.
  • adj. Lacking experience; immature: a young hand at plowing.
  • adj. Being the junior of two people having the same name.
  • adj. Geology Being of an early stage in a geologic cycle. Used of bodies of water and land formations.
  • n. Young persons considered as a group; youth: entertainment for the young.
  • n. Offspring; brood: a lioness with her young.
  • idiom with young Pregnant. Used of an animal.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. In the early part of growth or life; born not long ago.
  • adj. As if young; having the look or qualities of a young person.
  • adj. Of or belonging to the early part of life.
  • adj. Having little experience; inexperienced; unpracticed; ignorant; weak.
  • n. People who are young; young beings.
  • n. The younger generation.
  • n. Offspring.
  • v. To become or seem to become younger
  • v. To cause to appear younger
  • v. To exhibit younging

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Not long born; still in the first part of life; not yet arrived at adolescence, maturity, or age; not old; juvenile; -- said of animals.
  • adj. Being in the first part, pr period, of growth.
  • adj. Having little experience; inexperienced; unpracticed; ignorant; weak.
  • n. The offspring of animals, either a single animal or offspring collectively.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In physical geography, exhibiting an early stage of the geographic cycle, when sculpture or dissection is not far advanced.
  • Being in the first or early stage of life; not long born; not yet arrived at maturity or full age; not old: said of animals: as, a young child; a young man; a young horse.
  • Being in the first or early stage of growth: as, a young plant; a young tree.
  • Being in the first or early part of existence generally; not yet far advanced, of long duration, or of full development; recent; newly come to pass or to be.
  • Having the appearance and freshness or vigor of youth; youthful in look or feeling; fresh; vigorous.
  • Having little experience; ignorant; raw; green.
  • Pertaining or relating to youth; spent or passed during youth; youthful: as, in his younger days he was very hot-headed.
  • Junior: applied to the younger of two persons, especially when they have the same name or title: as, young Mr. Thomas Ray called with a message from his father.
  • Newly or lately arrived.
  • n. Offspring collectively.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. not tried or tested by experience
  • adj. being in its early stage
  • n. United States religious leader of the Mormon Church after the assassination of Joseph Smith; he led the Mormon exodus from Illinois to Salt Lake City, Utah (1801-1877)
  • n. United States baseball player and famous pitcher (1867-1955)
  • adj. (of crops) harvested at an early stage of development; before complete maturity
  • n. young people collectively
  • n. United States civil rights leader (1921-1971)
  • n. United States jazz tenor saxophonist (1909-1959)
  • n. United States film and television actress (1913-2000)
  • n. English poet (1683-1765)
  • n. any immature animal
  • adj. suggestive of youth; vigorous and fresh
  • adj. (used of living things especially persons) in an early period of life or development or growth
  • n. British physicist and Egyptologist; he revived the wave theory of light and proposed a three-component theory of color vision; he also played an important role in deciphering the hieroglyphics on the Rosetta Stone (1773-1829)

Etymologies

Middle English yong, from Old English geong; see yeu- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English yong, from Old English ġeong, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁en-. Compare West Frisian and Dutch jong, German jung, Danish ung. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • God forgives the inattention at Mass of an old man when he sleeps; of a young man when he loves; and the wandering attention of an _old_ man blessed with a _young_ heart the Almighty will surely pardon, for He Himself must admire beauty, since He made it. '

    A German Pompadour Being the Extraordinary History of Wilhelmine van Grävenitz, Landhofmeisterin of Wirtemberg

  • I knew there was no chance for Marian and Anne; they're old maids, and I'm young -- _young_.

    Black Oxen

  • He could hardly refrain from a smile when he came across the sentence, "He was young enough to know better," as he substituted in a large illegible hand the word _old_ for _young_.

    Red Pottage

  • "She couldn't hev things a-gwine on so as they had been, and she was gwine to make these yer young ones keep better order;" for Dinah herself, somehow, indulged the illusion that she herself was the soul of order, and it was only the _young uns_, and the everybody else in the house, that were the cause of anything that fell short of perfection in this respect.

    The Wit and Humor of America, Volume II. (of X.)

  • There would not be any thing essentially wrong in an attachment between these young people, if it sprang up naturally; only it would be necessary to impress upon them the fact that they were _young_, and that for years to come their minds should be largely occupied with other matters.

    A Knight of the Nineteenth Century

  • "She couldn't hev things a gwine on so as they had been, and she was gwine to make these yer young ones keep better order;" for Dinah herself, somehow, indulged the illusion that she, herself, was the soul of order, and it was only the _young uns_, and the everybody else in the house, that were the cause of anything that fell short of perfection in this respect.

    Uncle Tom's Cabin

  • Fled from her heart, yet she is young, is _young_;

    Poems

  • WHEN Foote was one day lamenting his growing old, a _pert_ young fellow asked him what he would give to be as _young_ as he.

    The Jest Book The Choicest Anecdotes and Sayings

  • The very best lesson for a horseman, young or old, is colt-breaking; and if in the attempt the _young_ horseman fails to do the colt justice, he will at least do him less injury than the country colt-breaker, or the generality of grooms.

    Hints on Horsemanship, to a Nephew and Niece or, Common Sense and Common Errors in Common Riding

  • Miss Carnaby heard the conversation of her young companions, and she gradually became conscious that William was not a boy; in fact, she began to wonder how she had ever thought so, for he, as she said unto herself, was "certainly a very interesting _young man_."

    Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Volume XXIII

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